***The Dawg Saloon Dental Thread ©***

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Bye You!, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    Post your dental questions here! :byeyou:
     
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  3. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Shed Founder

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    Does Lisa G wear dentures :dontknow:
     
  4. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    Oh, and in case anyone wonders about my credentials, here ya go:


    [​IMG]



    I was organizing my closet and came across my most treasured diploma, too:


    [​IMG]
     
  5. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    to be perfectly honest, i have NO FRIGGIN' IDEA!!!!!

    her teeth are an enigma

    but i don't think so. Dentures usually look very pretty. Hard to fuck up the way they look. I think she had really bad chairside composite resin bonded veneers for a few years, then finally upgraded to porcelain recently.

    BUT all the people on SFN, who, admittedly, know more about it than I, swear she wears dentures.
     
  6. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    Is the tongue considered part of the dental anatomy or ear,nose throat doctors?

    If dental what do you recommend for care and hygiene?
     
  7. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    As a general rule (mine), MDs don't know what goes on between the lips and the uvula. I know i examine the tongues of my patients, grabbing it in gauze, gently pulling it out, and moving it from side to side. Physicians cover it with a stick and look beyond it.

    Brushing your tongue when you brush your teeth removes odor-causing bacteria. Some people use a tongue scraper, but i think a toothbrush is fine. You don't want to look like this:

    [​IMG]


    Oral cancer is on the rise, even among non-smokers. Risk factors include smoking, of course, and alcohol use, but even those with low risk are getting some forms of cancer. HPV can cause it, also. It is important when you see a dentist that a thorough intraoral and extraoral exam is done to screen for any unusual growths or changes. The sides of the tongue is a common spot for cancer to develop.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2011
  8. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    :hat: Great info

    I've never had a dentist do any such thing before. They usually seem to take less interest than a physician. Maybe they just look at it while they are checking my teeth

    Looked up tongue scraper. Never even heard of it before. Although I thought I had heard the term tongue comb before but not sure
     
  9. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    This very useful PDF shows the connection between your teeth and organs of the body. A problem with an organ(s), even undetected, can be reflected in the health of your teeth.

    And conversely a problem with your teeth could reflect a corresponding problem in an organ(s) of the body, even if undetected.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.toothandbodyconnection.com/Tooth_Organ2.pdf

    http://fullspectrumenergymedicine.com/uploads/file/Tooth_Organ_Chart.jpg

    [​IMG]

    This is similar to the connection of different areas on the soles of your feet and the organs of the body

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2011
  10. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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  11. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    I agree with this. There are a lot of natural things that can be used in the fight against gum and periodontal disease.

    It is the #1 cause of tooth loss among adults, and 80% of adults suffer from some form of periodontal disease.

    The bacteria isolated in affected mouths has also been found in only one other spot in the body:

    the blood vessels of the heart.

    here they cause damage to the vessels, valves, and heart muscle. And they only get there from one place. your mouth.

    Cardiologists are slow to jump on the oral/heart connection, but it is there.

    I am starting to see more and more surgeons asking me to clear their patients for surgery. Those guys are smart. Ask your MD or cardiologist about this. And your dentist.
     
  12. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    Your approach, understanding, and willingness to learn more are why I've chosen you as my dentist for life

    You are one of the very very few doctors I know that take a big picture view of the body and actual understand the relationships. And on top of that you know how to handle a gun :wub:

    Unfortunately I all too commonly run into the opposite from doctors. Annoyance all the way to outright disgust is an all too common response I've received to requests for alternatives to prescriptions or radioactive testing

    Some here would be amazed at some of the recommendations I've been given by doctors for ailments

    Please continue to advocate your approach with anyone that will listen. I hope you charge the cardiologists a bundle for your consultation :grin:

    We need more doctors like you in the world BY [​IMG]
     
  13. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    Nope, the patient pays. It's just a routine exam, cleaning, and i have to sign something saying they are clear from "acute" infection.

    I do not like that wording, because periodontal disease is a "chronic" infection. If someone has PD (periodontal disease) and they are on top of it, with no obvious bacterial accumulations (plaque and tartar), then they are at no real greater risk than someone with a healthy mouth.

    BUT if they are obviously neglecting their mouth, I won't give clearance. I may be a bitch, but heck, it's not only their lives on the line, it's my name and my license.

    and thanks!
     
  14. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    xxx
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2011
  15. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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  16. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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  17. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    This directly relates to my last question that I removed due to lack of response :mad:
     
  18. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    oh did i miss something? was it a question for me? i'm sorry! :hug:
     
  19. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    The question was something along the lines of the chicken and the egg

    When a patient comes to you them may or may have or admit they have heart trouble

    How would you determine by their teeth if they may have other health problems (especially if they don't tell you) like heart trouble?

    How do you know the teeth problems are causing the heart problems as opposed to the opposite?
     
  20. Bye You!

    Bye You! Extreme VIP Gold

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    oh i missed that completely. sorry!

    that is a very very good question, and a very long one to answer.

    The last question is the easiest to answer as there hasn't been a definite concensus as to cause/effect. I am pretty sure that periodontal disease leads to/exacerbates heart disease, because i have never heard of it being the other way around.

    Periodontal disease is an autoimmune disease, and when you are putting your body in a constnt state of inflammation, that irritates the lining of blood vessels.

    Teeth themselves don't tell much about medical conditions, but the rest of the oral tissues can.

    Obviously, there's oral/pharyngeal cancer.

    Some cancers metastatize to the jaw bone. Other conditions have orofacial sign and symptoms, and have other serious mainfestations.

    example:

    Freckles around the mouth can be a sign of this:


    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a disorder often passed down through families (inherited) in which the person develops intestinal polyps and is at a significantly higher risk for developing certain cancers.


    specifically, intestinal cancers.

    Leukemia can also be discovered by the appearance of intraoral tissues.

    And we can also tell who gives head. :marx:

    anyway, there's a summary for you. The mouth is the window into the rest of the body. Find a good dentist and visit every 6 months.
     
  21. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    More succinctly what is your approach to root cause analysis :jj: Doc ?
     

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