News 10 Worst Cities to Find a Job

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by rory, Oct 29, 2015.

  1. rory

    rory Well-Known Member

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    10 Worst Cities to Find a Job

    Federal Reserve indicates that this trend should continue — they predict rates as low as 4.8 percent in 2017. But, with numbers this pretty, you can bet there is more to them than meets the eye.

    According to economists and the Congressional Budget Office, quite a bit of “slack” remains in the labor market. In economics, “slack” refers to the number of people looking for work who can’t find a job, as well as people who are not working as many hours as they’d like. Generally speaking, it encompasses all underutilized productive resources. The official unemployment rate only measures the number of people actively seeking a job but unable to find one. So even if 94.9 percent of Americans don't count as the nation's 'unemployed,' you can bet that many of them are still frustrated with their employment prospects.

    Nevertheless, unemployment remains a popular statistic reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The heat map below shows how state unemployment levels compare to one another. Certain regions have very high unemployment rates relative to how the country is faring overall; in many cases, this is due to the specific nuances of their local economies.

    A quick glance shows that many of the highest unemployment rates are in the West. California’s unemployment rate is 5.9 percent. Nevada’s is 6.7. New Mexico’s is 6.8. Upon deeper examination it is clear that many state-specific factors influence these high unemployment rates. For California, one obvious culprit is the drought. Given that agriculture accounts for 3 percent of jobs and 80 percent of water usage in California, a lack of rain creates various, multiplying effects.

    Without enough water, fruit and vegetables won’t grow and livestock can’t be maintained. While this is obvious enough, there are serious implications. Not only does this mean less produce for the U.S. as a whole, but fewer workers are needed to tend the fields and it is harder for farmers to stay in business.

    Detroit and its surrounding cities are another example of how the local economy can influence city-specific unemployment rates. Detroit, at 12.7 percent, has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. Pontiac, a city very near to Detroit, fares only slightly better at 11.6 percent. These numbers seem counterintuitive given that the state as a whole has an unemployment rate of 5 percent. However, upon examining the history and economic trends of Detroit, they aren’t so surprising after all.

    After the 1967 Race Riot, many working class citizens left the city, taking a huge amount of Detroit’s property tax base with them. This was then followed by local government corruptionand the fall of the automobile industry, which contributed to the struggling economy. Regions that are repeatedly hit hard, such as Detroit, find it more difficult to recover.

    As California and Michigan illustrate, local industries matter. Factors like weather and government can also have disproportionately large effects on economic growth.

    Interestingly, though some states fare worse than others, there can be great variation between city-specific unemployment levels. To examine this phenomenon and figure out where it is hardest to find work, the analysts at StartClass and MooseRootslooked at U.S. cities with populations larger than 20k and parsed through the data to find the ones with the highest rates of unemployment.

    Despite the high unemployment rates of certain states, there are various reasons to expect continued economic improvement. Two reasons include the government's investment in both infrastructure and tourism. In 2014, the Department of the Treasury made plans to improve the nation’s infrastructure and, since then, has been working to expand the market — these investments should go a long way in spurring job creation.

    Additionally, since Obama launched the National Travel and Tourism Strategy in 2012, the U.S. has seen record numbers of visitors, and they are only forecasted to go up. The increased business that tourism brings will aid the nation’s economic growth, and jobs are sure to follow. So, if you’re looking for work, many signs point upward. You just might want to play it safe and avoid moving to the cities listed below.



    10. Pontiac, Michigan
    Unemployment rate: 11.60%



    9. East St. Louis, Illinois
    Unemployment rate: 11.70%



    8. Selma, Alabama
    Unemployment rate: 11.90%



    7. Harvey, Illinois
    Unemployment rate: 12.10%



    6. Wasco, California
    Unemployment rate: 12.30%



    5. Detroit, Michigan
    Unemployment rate: 12.70%



    4. Yuma, Arizona
    Unemployment rate: 16.10%



    3. El Centro, California
    Unemployment rate: 22.10%



    2. Brawley, California
    Unemployment rate: 25.90%



    1. Calexico, California
    Unemployment rate: 27.40%
     
  2. rory

    rory Well-Known Member

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    The United States
    National
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.10%
    • 1 Month Ago: 5.10%
    • 1 Year Ago: 5.90%
    149
    MILLION
    • Past Month: -236,000
    • Past Year: 2,193,000
    California
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.90%
    • 1 Month Ago: 6.10%
    • 1 Year Ago: 7.30%
    17.9
    MILLION
    • Past Month: 11,881
    • Past Year: 399,259
    Texas
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    4.20%
    • 1 Month Ago: 4.10%
    • 1 Year Ago: 4.80%
    12.5
    MILLION
    • Past Month: -9,111
    • Past Year: -36,356
    New York
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.10%
    • 1 Month Ago: 5.20%
    • 1 Year Ago: 6.00%
    9.13
    MILLION
    • Past Month: 4,603
    • Past Year: 159,537
    Florida
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.20%
    • 1 Month Ago: 5.40%
    • 1 Year Ago: 5.80%
    9.03
    MILLION
    • Past Month: 42,458
    • Past Year: -13,195
    Illinois
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.40%
    • 1 Month Ago: 5.60%
    • 1 Year Ago: 6.40%
    6.15
    MILLION
    • Past Month: 15,842
    • Past Year: 51,491
    Pennsylvania
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.30%
    • 1 Month Ago: 5.40%
    • 1 Year Ago: 5.30%
    6.07
    MILLION
    • Past Month: -834
    • Past Year: 50,661
    Ohio
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    4.50%
    • 1 Month Ago: 4.60%
    • 1 Year Ago: 5.30%
    5.44
    MILLION
    • Past Month: 3,522
    • Past Year: 16,173
    North Carolina
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.80%
    • 1 Month Ago: 5.90%
    • 1 Year Ago: 5.80%
    4.48
    MILLION
    • Past Month: 3,670
    • Past Year: 118,509
    Michigan
    State
    Data for September 2015

    Add to Compare

    5.00%
    • 1 Month Ago: 5.10%
    • 1 Year Ago: 6.70%
    4.5
    MILLION
    • Past Month: 9,799
    • Past Year: 67,987
     
  3. azman5103

    azman5103 Well-Known Member

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    Seems like places with a lot of you know whos......so it is a "bad place to get a job"...or a place full of people that don't want to work?
     
  4. cg256

    cg256 Well-Known Member VIP

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    Umm, this article must be mistaken and racist cuz @Ving told me we are at full employment. You're obviously a stupid teabagger plant spreading lies and propoganda.
     
  5. Ving

    Ving Well-Known Member

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    Lol, everyone of those people can sign up to be an Uber driver today. 100% employment