75 Years of Racial Control: Happy Birthday Marijuana Prohibition

Discussion in 'The Bar' started by gilaet, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. gilaet

    gilaet Grandiosa Kjøttboller Gold

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    "There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others."- Harry Anslinger, first Drug Czar.

    As we approach the 75th anniversary of marijuana prohibition in the United States on October 1, it is important to remember why marijuana was deemed illicit in the first place, and why we as Americans must open our eyes to the insidious strategy behind 75 years of failed policy and ruined lives. Marijuana laws were designed not to control marijuana, but to control the Mexican immigrants who had brought this native plant with them to the U.S. Fears over loss of jobs and of the Mexicans themselves led cities to look for ways to keep a close eye on the newcomers. In 1914, El Paso Texas became the first jurisdiction in the U.S. to ban the sale and possession of marijuana. This ban gave police the right to search, detain and question Mexican immigrants without reason, except the suspicion that they were in possession of marijuana. Folklore started to erupt about the effect that marijuana had on those who used it. As Harry Anslinger stated, "Reefer makes darkies think they're as good as white men."

    Fast forward to 2012. Marijuana is still an illicit substance and the laws are still being used to justify the search, detainment and questioning of populations deemed "untrustworthy" and "suspicious" by modern society, namely the poor and young men of color. A prime example is New York's Stop and Frisk program, which stopped nearly 700,000 people in 2011. Hailed as a strategy for removing guns and violent crime from the streets, this method of stopping and questioning "suspicious" individuals, highlights the racial inequities associated with drug laws. From 2002 to 2011, African American and Hispanic residents made up close to 90% of people stopped. This is not limited to New York. In California, African-Americans are 4 times more likely to be arrested for marijuana, 12 times more likely to go to prison with a felony marijuana charge, and 3 times more likely to go to prison with a marijuana possession charge.

    The strategy of using marijuana laws to stop, detain and imprison poor and minority populations must stop NOW. In the past 75 years we have seen mounting evidence of the benign nature of the marijuana plant, and its tremendous potential for medical development. But the rampant misinformation about the effects of marijuana USE is dwarfed by the lifetime of suffering that a marijuana CONVICTION can bring. In 2010, there were 853,839 marijuana arrests in the U.S., 750,591 of those were for possession. A drug conviction in America is the gift that keeps on giving. Affected individuals must face a lifetime of stigma that can prevent employment, home ownership, education, voting and the ability to be a parent. The issue of mass incarceration and the War on Drugs is featured in the new documentary, The House I Live In. In the film, Richard L. Miller, author of Drug Warriors and Their Prey, From Police Power to Police State, presents a very sinister take on the method behind the Drug War madness. Miller suggests that drug laws, such as those for marijuana are part of a process of annihilation aimed at poor and minority populations. Miller poses that drug laws are designed to identify, ostracize, confiscate, concentrate, and annihilate these populations by assigning the label of drug user, criminal, or addict, seizing property, taking away freedom and institutionalizing entire communities in our ever growing prison system.

    We can stop this from happening. Marijuana was deemed illegal without acknowledging science or the will of the people. 75 years later, 50% of the population supports marijuana legalization, and families are still being torn apart and lives destroyed over the criminal sanctions associated with its use. The most vulnerable members of our society are also the targets of a prison industrial complex out of control and getting bigger every day. Someone is arrested for marijuana in the U.S. every 38 seconds, we have no time to waste, tax and regulate now.

    Oregon, Colorado and Washington are all considering a more sensible and humane approach to marijuana as all three have tax and regulate initiatives on their ballots this November. This is a unique opportunity for citizens to cast a vote heard round the world, to stand up not only for the freedom to consume marijuana, but against the atrocities and human suffering that result from the criminalization of it.


    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amanda-reiman/marijuana-prohibition-anniversary_b_1923370.html
     
  2. nazdrowie

    nazdrowie Sultan of Sweat Gold

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    too long; smoke a joint
     
  3. Gomez

    Gomez Well-Known Member

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  4. BleedingGums

    BleedingGums Fesh Fox Faggot VIP

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  5. Reggae Mistress

    Reggae Mistress Old Catcher's Mitt

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    Reefer Madness
     
  6. sternski

    sternski New Member Banned User

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    enjoy...

    [video=vimeo;5887468]http://vimeo.com/5887468[/video]
     
  7. JJR

    JJR New Member

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    Yeah man, that's a lot of words. I could have my computron read them to me while I pack a bowl. :idea:
     
  8. HAL

    HAL HAM

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    Im getting low, gotta get more soon
     
  9. fenderbaum

    fenderbaum Active Member

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    I am for legalization. Also if legalized then they could also get rid of that ridiculous law that bans farmers from growing hemp, which is one of the heartiest and easy to grow crops that is widely used in textiles as well as other forms of manufacturing. It is not smokable, and currently we are paying a premium to import the product while our own farmers are suffering. Lets get with it people.
     
  10. Capn Crud

    Capn Crud The Pride of Cucamonga VIP

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    Everybody that I know that gets high is white
     
  11. Mojopin

    Mojopin Resplendent in his frock VIP

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    Me too, but I live in Montana.
     
  12. gwartney

    gwartney Is there gas in the car? Gold

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    I think Obama is holding that in his back pocket for the election. If he sees things getting close, he is going to come out in favor of some kind of decriminalization.
     
  13. sstressed

    sstressed enhancement toker VIP

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    the bible thumpers and drug and alcohol makers don't like pot so it will remain illegal for a long time to come.


    the good news is, some of us grow legally as far as our states are concerned. that's a big step. hopefully, in another 50 years, it'll be decrimed. maybe.
     
  14. fenderbaum

    fenderbaum Active Member

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    Forget decriminalization, most states already have decriminalized it, there must be legalization so that the tax can be levied on it.
     
  15. sstressed

    sstressed enhancement toker VIP

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    i'm an anybody but barry kind of guy but if he said he'd call off the dogs, i might consider voting for him or at least not for the other guy. maybe.
     
  16. eliasbboy

    eliasbboy Insert Witty Title Here Staff Member

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  17. gilaet

    gilaet Grandiosa Kjøttboller Gold

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    I'm against legalization.
    We'll end up with some McDonald's weed where we end up paying a shitload in tax and barely get a buzz.
     
  18. gwartney

    gwartney Is there gas in the car? Gold

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    There is still a Federal law making it illegal. 12 states have decriminalized it in spite of this. I agree it should be legal but I think it is going to take baby steps.
     
  19. HeinousMark

    HeinousMark Creepy-Ass Cracka VIP

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    I'm sorry but "WHUT?" ..........I'm stoned.......:eek:
     
  20. BaddFunn

    BaddFunn Kick ass fuck yeah VIP

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    Happy Meal :yay: