$$$$<><>8PM Dawg Saloon Poker Tourney Wednesday 9/12<><>$$$$

Discussion in 'The Bar' started by Bro, Sep 12, 2012.

  1. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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  2. Mark Mayonnaise

    Mark Mayonnaise You look like a tree! VIP

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  3. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    Just me n Juggs so far.
     
  4. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    10 mins...need 1 more.
     
  5. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    Lets get this party started quickly, right?
     
  6. tomtom

    tomtom Well-Known Member

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    Abyssinia

    In this five card stud high-low variant players start with no cards and buy known or unknown cards to form their hand.

    The players place their ante and the dealer turns up two cards and places them one each side of the face down deck. Starting with the player to dealer's left, each player in turn may choose to buy either one of the face up cards or the unknown top card of the face down deck. The price depends on the ran of the card - for example 2-5: 2 units, 6-K: 1 unit, ace: 4 units. If a card is bought from the deck it is dealt face up so that its price can be paid. After a face up card is bought, the top card of the deck is turned face up to replace it.

    After everyone has bought their first card there is a round of betting, begun by the player to dealer's left. The process is repeated four more times, so that each player who has not folded has five cards. The highest and lowest hands split the pot.

    This game could be played with all players' hands face up throughout, since in theory everyone knows what cards everyone has. Alternatively the players can pick up the cards as they buy them and hold them as a concealed hand. In this case the fifth round of buying cards could be followed by a final betting round and declaration of high, low or both, though if the players have perfect memories they will already know who has won.

    The Price is Right

    This is a seven-card stud high-low game for three to seven players in which everyone starts with two down-cards and buys the remainder.

    After players have placed their ante, the dealer deals two cards face down to each player: players may look at their cards. The dealer places two cards face up on the table side by side with the face-down deck next to them. The upcard further from the deck costs 1 unit, the upcard nearer the deck costs 2 units and the unknown top card of the deck costs three units.

    Each player in turn, beginning with the player to the dealer's left, must either fold or purchase one of the three cards on offer. Face-up cards remain face up; if the top card of the deck is bought, the buyer looks at it and keeps it face down, unknown to the other players. If the cheaper face-up card is bought, the dearer card slides over to replace it and a new card is turned up for the 2-unit position. If the dearer face-up card is bought it is replaced by turning up the top card of the deck. After everyone has had the chance to buy, there is a round of betting begun by the player with the best hand showing.

    This is repeated until the final round of betting when everyone has seven cards. The players then declare high low or both and there is a showdown.

    Variation: this game can be played with three upcards costing 1, 2 and 3 units and the face down card costing 4.

    Auction

    This is another seven-card high-low game. After antes are placed the dealer deals two cards face down to each player, which they may look at.

    The dealer now deals face up to the table as many cards as there are players. Everyone simultaneously chooses how much to bid and holds that value of chips in a closed fist. Everyone must bid at least the amount of the minimum bet, and a maximum bid may also be agreed. On a signal from the delaer all players open their hands and reveal their bids. The player who bid highest chooses one of the face up cards and adds it to his or her hand face up; then the next highest bidder does the same and so on, the lowest bidder getting the last card. In case of a tie, the player with the higher poker hand showing goes first; if the hands are also equal, the player nearer to dealer's left has priority. All the bids are added to the pot.

    This procedure is repeated four more times. When everyone has seven cards, there is a betting round. The surviving players then declare high, low or both and there is a showdown.

    Grocery Store Dots

    This is a seven-card stud game. "Dots" are the pips in the centre column of each card: aces, fives, sevens and nines have one dot; twos, eights and tens have 2 dots, threes have three dots and fours, sixes and picture cards have no dots. The pot is split between the highest five-card hand and the player whose seven cards have most dots.

    After everyone has placed their ante, the dealer deals two hole cards and one upcard to each player as in seven-card stud, and the first betting round takes place.

    The dealer then sets out the "grocery store" consisting of a row of three face up cards on the table, and marks the leftmost card by placing a chip or other marker on it. This card costs 1 unit, the card next to it 2 units and the third card 3 units. From now on, a player who is about to be dealt a card from the deck has the option to buy a card from the grocery store instead, placing the appropriate price in chips in the pot. A player who chooses not to buy is dealt a card from the deck as normal.

    If a card is bought, the store is restocked from the deck immediately before the next purchase decision. That means that if the dealer buys a card, the store is not restocked until after the betting round that follows.

    When everyone has four upcards the remaining store stock is discarded, After the betting round, a final card is dealt to each player face down, and there is a final betting round foolowed by a showdown in which the high hand and the player with most dots split the pot.

    Wall Street

    This seven card stud game is similar to The Price is Right, with the difference that there are four face up cards on sale, and a player who does not wish to buy any of them is dealt a free card face up from the deck.

    The dealer deals two cards face down and one face up to each player, and a row of four cards face up to the table. These cards are called Wall Street, and the card at one end of the row is marked with a chip. There is a round of betting, begun by the player with the highest card showing.

    Now each player in turn starting to dealer's left acquires another upcard. The card can be bought from Wall Street: the card marked with a chip costs 1 unit and the others cost 2, 3 and 4 units respectively. The price is paid to the pot. A player does not want to buy from Wall Street is dealt a card face up from the deck. Immediately before each purchase decision, any empty position in Wall Street is filled by dealing a new card from the deck. After everyone has their new card there is a betting round, begun by the player with the highest hand showing. Note that if the last player bought from Wall Street, there will only be three cards showing during the betting round, since Wall Street is not replenished until the beginning of the next buying round.

    The process is repeated two more times, so that everyone has four up cards. The unsold Wall Street stock is then discarded. After the ensuing betting round a card is dealt face down to each player. There is a then final betting round after which players declare high, low or both and the high and low winners split the pot.
     
  7. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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  8. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    See u all at 10.

    :coffee:
     
  9. Mlaw

    Mlaw Quite Contrarian Gold

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    fucked by 5's
     
  10. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    Avery just kept stealing blinds towards the end.

    It's hard to call all with 8 5.
     
  11. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    Still in first place. :cheer:
     
  12. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    10PM open for registration.
     
  13. tomtom

    tomtom Well-Known Member

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    Many people have difficulty shuffling playing cards, and this can be problematic when playing at a table without a professional dealer – such as in home games or self dealt games (where each player takes it in turn to shuffle and deal). The solution to this problem is to get a pack of playing cards and learn how to shuffle – which is the objective of these card shuffling tutorials.
    Over the years I’ve sat next to lots of players who say “I can’t shuffle” or “excuse my poor shuffling”. If they’re really bad then someone usually offers to shuffle for them, for which they’re usually grateful. If you fall into this minority of poker players then now is the time to learn. You probably can’t shuffle because you’ve never been taught the correct techniques. While you may think shuffling cards looks hard or complicated, it’s actually fairly easy. It’s similar to when you learn how to play poker, i.e. understanding the correct techniques, and then practicing. Repetition is the key to success!
    The Different Methods of Shuffling Cards
    There are many different ways to shuffle a deck of cards. For these card shuffling tutorials I’ll be covering the following methods:
    The Overhand Shuffle – This is the shuffle used by most people. A good simple, lazy, sloppy shuffle.
    The Hindu Shuffle – A simple, quick and very elegant shuffle. One of my personal favourites.
    The Weave Shuffle – A very simple shuffle to perform and for those yet to master the riffle shuffle.
    The Riffle Shuffle – This is a great way to shuffle cards and not as difficult as it looks.
    The Table Riffle Shuffle – This is easier than the in the hands riffle shuffle, yet just as effective and elegant.
    The Strip Shuffle – Also known as running cuts and is a great finish for the table riffle shuffle.
    The Overhand Shuffle
    The overhand shuffle is the shuffling technique most employed by beginners so this is where we’ll start. The standard overhand shuffle is a simple way to shuffle cards. It is a very open, casual, somewhat sloppy shuffle, in contrast to the more elegant riffle shuffle and table shuffle which will be explained later.
    The Handling
    Hold the deck by the sides so that the deck is on its edge.
    The fingers of the right hand rest lightly against the back of the deck, thumb on top.
    The left hand grips the deck and lifts off as the thumb holds a few cards back
    The thumb moves out of the way as the left hand comes back down.
    The thumb then takes a few more cards.
    As the left hand again moves up
    This action is repeated several times
    The deck is finally squared up.
    Important Points / Tips
    The important point with this shuffle is to have a light touch.
    You may also like to curl the index finger of the right hand around the deck to offer extra support.
    If you find the thumb is taking too many cards in big groups or it is only taking single cards then don’t worry about this, with further practise you will get the balance right.
    Instead of using the thumb to pull the cards off, you can just use the other hand to throw the cards down. Some people find this easier to do and a more natural action.
    The Hindu Shuffle
    I don’t know why this is called the Hindu shuffle, but my guess is that it originates from India. I have seen lots of Asian people shuffle cards using this technique. There is a similar shuffle called the Arab Shuffle, but I prefer this handling. The shuffle is very simple and quite easy to perform. Once you have the hang of this shuffle I’m sure you’ll use it all the time.
    The Handling
    Hold the deck by the end with the thumb and middle finger. The index finger can rest lightly on top for more support.
    Here is an image from below.
    The right hand comes underneath the deck. The thumb, middle and ring finger touch the side of the deck. The index finger stays out in front.
    The right hand lightly takes packets of cards from the top of the deck.
    The removed cards fall onto the palm of the right hand. The index finger stops the cards from flying forward.
    The right hand goes beneath the deck once more and removes another packet.
    This action is repeated several times until there are only a few cards left. These are placed ontop of the deck, which is then squared.
    An image from behind to show you the correct technique.
    Important Points / Tips
    The key to this shuffle is to form a trap with the fingers so that the cards fall neatly into the palm. The index finger is especially important as it will stop the cards from flying everywhere.
    The index finger of the other hand can go where you like. I usually keep it well out of the way.
    It is up to you about how many packets you glide off the top. I usually drag about ten packets then repeat the shuffle again.
    Don’t go too fast at first, unless you want to perform the 52 card pick up trick!
    The Weave Shuffle
    To be honest I rarely use this shuffle as I prefer the riffle shuffle, which is much quicker. However this is a very easy shuffle and is ideal for people who have yet to master the riffle shuffle. It’s easy yet it does a good job of mixing the cards.
    The Handling
    Hold the cards by the edge and using the thumb seperate about half the cards.
    Align the upper pack of cards against the lower pack.
    Weave the cards together by the edges.
    Push the cards together by about an inch or so.
    Bend the cards with the palm of the left hand and then release the pressure.
    Square the cards up.
    Important Points / Tips
    Don’t be too rough with the cards. This shuffle can damage the cards when performed badly. Use a light touch and you will find the cards will weave together more easily.
    It’s also easier if you weave the corners together rather than the whole sides.
    You do not have to perform the cascade finish with this shuffle. The other option is to just push the two packets together and square the deck.
    The Riffle Shuffle (in the hands)
    This is a great way to shuffle cards. While this shuffle looks impressive, it’s actually far easier than you might think. Yes, I’ll admit it does take some getting used to, but once you have a feel for the cards it’ll be second nature.
     
  14. Mlaw

    Mlaw Quite Contrarian Gold

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    once we were head to head, I was getting shit hands.
     
  15. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    I'm just sayin that's what he did to me. he went all in every time i was on the big blind at the end.
     
  16. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    tomtom feels left out.

    I think he's scared to play.

    There's a mobile app tomtom.
     
  17. tomtom

    tomtom Well-Known Member

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    What would be worse than pokerstars on a computer? Pokerstars on a phone.


    Oh that reminds me.

    What's difficult? Getting a New Yorker to move to Chicago.


















    What's more difficult? Getting him to move back.
     
  18. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    I was thinking of your ipad. it doesnt work on my phone.
     
  19. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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    a couple of those raises i had KK. :whistle:

    :lol:
     
  20. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

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    Don't think i didnt notice.