News Across US, Over 220 Prison Escapees Listed as on the Loose

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by dawg, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Aug 19, 2010
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    Somewhere out there are an admitted killer who crawled through a Texas prison's ventilation ducts, a murderer who apparently escaped from an Indiana institution in a garbage truck, and a Florida convict who got other inmates to put him in a crate at the prison furniture shop and had himself delivered to freedom by truck.

    They're among more than 220 state prison escapees nationwide who are listed as on the loose, The Associated Press found in a coast-to-coast survey.

    Most broke out decades ago, meaning the chances of finding them have dwindled dramatically — that is, if they're even alive.

    Still, "you don't forget about them," said former Oklahoma corrections chief James Saffle, who worked for 11 years tracking escaped convicts. "Sometimes, some little action they take will trigger something."

    For the past two weeks, up to 800 federal, state and local law enforcement officers have been searching the woods and swamps around a maximum-security state prison in far northern New York for two convicted killers who used power tools to break out. The hunt is still in the early and intensive on-the-ground phase.

    After sightings wane and the dragnets come up empty, some states regularly revisit escape cases, keep an eye on vanished prisoners' associates and check fingerprint databases, death certificates or other sources for new leads.

    But investigators largely have to hold out hope that they will get a tip out of the blue or that the convict will slip up, perhaps by contacting a relative or getting arrested for another crime.

    Successful escapes from secure, fenced prisons are rare. At least 24 states say they have no such prisoners at large.

    The U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics reported about 2,000 state and federal inmates escaped or went off without leave in 2013. But the figure doesn't indicate how many were caught and does not distinguish between breaking out of prison and walking away from work release or other unfenced settings.

    The AP asked all states for a current total of escapees from secure, locked state prisons where they were held full time. California, the most populous state, and Ohio couldn't immediately provide an answer, and others responded only for recent decades, so the total is almost certainly higher than the 224 the AP counted.

    Officials say most of the breakouts are decades old because prisons have become more secure. Some escapees are surely dead. One 1955 absconder from Illinois would now be 112. One escape on Alabama's list happened in 1929. Maryland's 90 unsolved escapes date to 1937, many involving the notorious and now-closed Maryland House of Correction, which had a long history of riots and mass breakouts.

    Some fugitives' whereabouts are no mystery.

    Joanne Chesimard was granted asylum in Cuba after her 1979 escape from the New Jersey prison where the former Black Panther was serving a life sentence in the killing of a state trooper. Jose Fernando Bustos-Diaz, the Texas inmate who squeezed through the ventilation system in 2010 to get out of a 35-year sentence for cutting his boss' throat, is believed to be in Mexico.

    But others could be anywhere, as New York officials acknowledged after Richard Matt and David Sweat cut their way out of Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, close to the Canadian border, on June 6.
  2. SouthernListen

    SouthernListen I don't follow the crowd. Sorry about that. VIP

    Jan 16, 2012
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    ICE: 167,527 Criminal Aliens Loose in U.S.A.

    ( - According to weekly detention and departure reports from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, there were 167,527 non-detained convicted criminal aliens in the United States as of Jan. 26 of this year, a congressional hearing revealed Thursday.

    House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah.) read the statistic aloud Thursday durin a hearing examining ICE's priorities and procedures for removing criminal aliens currently living in the United States.

    “In that report, it said that there are 167,527 non-detained, final-order convicted criminals on the loose in the United States,” Chaffetz pointed out while questioning ICE Director Sarah Saldana.

    “These are people that are here illegally, get caught, convicted, and you release back out into the public,” he said, adding that some of the crimes committed by those who have been released include homicide, sex crimes, child pornography, drunk driving, robbery and kidnapping.

    The federal government announced Wednesday that ICE had released about 30,000 convicted criminal aliens from ICE custody in 2014 alone, according to The Washington Times, which first reported the statistic.

    As reported in February, ICE admitted to releasing 36,007 criminal aliens from the agency’s custody in Fiscal Year 2013, including those convicted of sex crimes, homicide, drunk driving, kidnapping and robbery. Of these, 1,000 went on to commit new crimes ranging from assault with a deadly weapon and lewd acts with a child to aggravated assault, robbery, and hit-and-run.

    During the hearing, Saldana said that ICE releases criminal aliens back into the community based on the agency’s “discretionary control.”

    “Madam Director, if you’re a criminal, will you be deported?” Chaffetz asked Saldana.

    “Those are the people we’re looking for, yes,” Saldana responded.

    “But they’ve been in your detention. They’ve been detained. I mean they were convicted. They were…were they deported?” Chaffetz pressed.

    “They were in the process of being deported,” Saldana claimed. “Everyone in our detention facilities is in the process of being deported, chairman.”

    “Well that’s not true. I mean, you regularly release them back out into the public before they get deported, correct?” Chaffetz continued.

    Of the roughly 36,000 criminal aliens released by ICE in 2013, about 22,000 were released under ICE’s “discretionary control,” she estimated.

    “So you don’t automatically deport them, then?” Chaffetz asked.

    “Automatically, sir? No,” Saldana responded, adding that “the law gives us that discretion.”

    “And so when we say, if you’re a criminal, you’ll be deported, that’s not necessarily true,” Chaffetz said.

    “It is true, sir. It’s in--”

    “After they get released back into the public for untold number of times?” Chaffetz asked.

    “It does happen. It does happen, yes, and that’s exactly what we’re here to do,” Saldana admitted.

    “What does happen? That they get released?” Chaffetz asked.

    “Yes,” Saldana said, “Even criminals that are released.

    “Those people were released under the laws of the United States,” Saldana added, explaining that according to “due process,” it can easily take “months and even years to deport folks.”
  3. shrinkage

    shrinkage Well-Known Member

    May 8, 2012
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    Of course spending time in prison will make you loose
    SouthernListen likes this.