American teens don’t want to work

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Shithead, May 1, 2014.

  1. Shithead

    Shithead Well-Known Member

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    [FONT=&amp]Lazy little fucks



    American teens don’t want to work[/FONT]


    [FONT=&amp]Decline in summer jobs can’t all be blamed on the economy[/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]
    Shutterstock.com / George Dolgikh [/FONT]

    [FONT=&amp]Here’s yet another thing your teenager doesn’t want to do this summer: get a job. [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]The number of teens with summer jobs has fallen roughly 30 percentage points since the late ‘70s. In 1978, nearly three in four teenagers (71.8%) ages 16 to 19 held a summer job, but as of last year, only about four in 10 teens did, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the month of July analyzed by outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas . It’s been a steady decline, seen even during good times: During the dot-com boom in the late 1990s, when national unemployment was only about 4%, roughly six in 10 teens held summer jobs. Even recently, with the economy recovering, fewer teens opted for jobs: Last year’s summer job gain was down 3% from the summer payrolls in 2012, the report revealed. [/FONT]


    [FONT=&amp]What’s more, John Challenger, the CEO of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, says this is a trend that will likely continue. “We’re in a different era,†he says. “Being a teen is different than it used to be.†[/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]Of course, some of this low teen unemployment can be blamed on the lackluster economy. Indeed, teen unemployment is more than 20% (remember that unemployment rates only measure those actively seeking jobs), in part because they are competing for jobs with other groups, including recent college grads and those with work experience. [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]But that can’t quite explain why fewer teens are working even during periods of economic expansion, says Challenger. He says that teens who are dropping out of the workforce represent only a small portion of those not working; instead, he says, most of these teens are choosing not to work in the summer. Indeed, there were nearly 11.4 million 16- to- 19-year-olds who were not in the workforce last summer -- and of those only about 951,000 (or 8.3%) said they wanted a job, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that Challenger, Gray & Christmas analyzed. “While the number of 16- to 19-year-olds not in the labor force who want a job has remained relatively flat since the mid-1990s, the number not wanting a job has steadily increased,†the report revealed. [/FONT]


    [FONT=&amp]This doesn’t mean that teens are simply tanning by the pool or binge-watching Bravo (though some certainly are). Challenger says that many teens are in summer school (rates of summer school attendance are at one of the highest levels ever, he says), volunteering, doing extracurricular activities to pad their college applications and trying out unpaid internships. And all of these are worthwhile endeavors (well, minus the tanning and Bravo), especially as it becomes more competitive to get into many elite colleges. [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]That said, experts say that paid work has value for a number of reasons — and that teens (even those who plan to go to college) who don’t do it may be at a disadvantage. “It’s critical for teenagers to work, to begin to understand the working world, the value of a paycheck†says Gene Natali, co-author of “The Missing Semester†and a senior vice president at Pittsburgh investment firm C.S. McKee. “Choosing not to work a paid job has consequences.†[/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]One clear reason for this, he says, is that the money they earn can be put to good use. The average household with a teenage child has only saved $21,416 for college, according to data released this year from Sallie Mae — far less than the $164,000 that a four-year private college will cost or the $74,000 that a public four-year in-state school will cost. And considering that for every $1 borrowed, the child will have to pay back roughly $2, saving money from a summer job can help offset student loan debt. Plus, working in a tough, low-paying job can motivate students to study harder in college and help them get a job down the road, as many employers want to see that applicants have worked for pay before, says Dan Levin, host of the radio program “Investment Talk.†“It’s valuable experience even well past age 19,†Levin says. [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]Even if the child gets a full ride to college, she should still start saving now, says Natali. He uses this example: A child who begins saving just $3 a day from age 15 through the age of 25 and then nothing thereafter would end up with a million by the age of 65 in his Roth IRA; if the child waits to start saving $3 per day until age 35 and saves each day until age 65, he will only have about $220,000. Plus, he says, “it’s harder to chase your dreams without the financial freedom to do so.†For example, if a child graduates college and wants to spend a year writing a novel, money earned during his teen years could help fund that so he or she didn’t have to take a full-time job. [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]What’s more, paid work can look good on a college application, says Elizabeth Heaton, a college admissions consultant and a former admissions officer at the University of Pennsylvania. “I loved paying jobs when I saw them on applications,†she says. She says the experience can show that students can show up on time, be responsible and do a job they’re hired to do, and deal with adults they aren’t related to. And since many unpaid internships or volunteer opportunities are only a few days a week, many teens can balance that with a paid job (or better yet, get a paid job that is related to a field they want to study), says Natali. [/FONT]
     
  2. jyanks

    jyanks Well-Known Member

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    I don't want to work either, but I still get up every day & do it.
     
  3. Nemo

    Nemo Beer Can Thick Gold

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    Why work when you can mooch off your parents...or tax payers?
     
  4. Wesmantooth

    Wesmantooth VIP Extreme Gold

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    why hire a american teen when you can hire a Meehican for a fraction of the cost
     
  5. Shithead

    Shithead Well-Known Member

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    Reality is that their parents are really the douchebags
     
  6. noname2

    noname2 Well-Known Member Banned User

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    All my kids worked and now they know how to budget, do taxes, etc. it is also an important social experience as well as learning important job behavior.
     
  7. Kool

    Kool Well-Known Member

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    teens want to work, that story is complete bullshit.
     
  8. MyLazyHand

    MyLazyHand Russia and France Know What to Do

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    My brother wants to buy his son a Corvette when the boy turns 16 and gets his license. I have had heated arguments with my brother about the fact he'll place his son's life in danger. The kid doesn't even ride a bike.

    Never mind the fact that my nephew will spend 20+ years trying to earn enough money to purchase a car similar to what he was GIVEN when he turned 16. It'll mess up his concept of work/reward.
     
  9. HowieStearn

    HowieStearn HateClub

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    [​IMG] why should anyone work? it cuts into their hobby time

    The 73-year-old former House Speaker then indicated that a work force dominated by part-timers is a good thing for employees, indicating ObamaCare will give workers more free time.
    “Overwhelmingly, for the American people, this is a liberation,” she contended, adding that the monstrous law will give citizens “the freedom to pursue [their] happiness.”

    Read more at http://www.westernjournalism.com/pelosi-celebrates-loss-full-time-jobs/#6sOKl3whl6DtUmzd.99
     
  10. Joe Bauers

    Joe Bauers Well-Known Member

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    It's not only the teens, I work in a field, where I need to do work in neighborhoods . and you would be amazed how many people don't work. and are home during the day.
     
  11. Shithead

    Shithead Well-Known Member

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    It pisses me off when parents pay for college....You've already wiped their noses and asses for 18 years and now you go into debt so they get an education in a field that they alot of times decide they really don't want to do when they graduate
     
  12. R.P. McMurphy

    R.P. McMurphy Well-Known Member

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    ...in every conversation we have about lowly employees not wanting to work or a story about the employees inefficiency no one ever brings up the fact that ceos are making 3000 times the amount of any employee. maybe these kids will end up looking smarter than theyre given credit for-for saying fuck no we don want your shit job for shit pay. i see both sides of the argument but the truth is this is not the same country that it was when i was a teenager or when my own kids were teenagers for that matter. when i got out of high school and started my 1st year at a jr college the biggest expense was paying room and board for a place to stay close to the school. it was damn near free to get an education except for the cost of books at the school bookstore. as long as these fuckers keep us fighting between each other for shit jobs and a loan to payoff after education with no job to be had then theyre going to profit everytime while the working class wonders why theyre always broke. in 2009 the minimum wage was raised to $7.25 an hour. raise your hand if you can live on $7.25 an hour.
     
  13. SouthernListen

    SouthernListen I don't follow the crowd. Sorry about that. VIP

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    Once you've driven a hot car, it's hard to go back. And in this age of denying one's self nothing as long as you can borrow to get it, this is what happens. People become debt-serfs right out of high school.

    As for teens, I used to hire a lot of older teens and young 20-somethings in the 80's. I was actually surprised how hard most of them worked for the low pay and how articulate and personable many were. They enjoyed the job and socializing together so they didn't want to lose it. But they also just had a much more mature attitude and were actually adults by age 18. A decade later I started a business and got a rude awakening. The mentality had completely changed. They acted like having a job was for losers, were only there by compulsion, and were pretty fucking dumb at using any common sense. By today a teenager can barely speak face-to-face. What changed? The previous bunch had parents from before the baby boom. The latter ones had baby boomer parents. The mentality was something they learned at home. Boomer parents often did not want their children doing "menial" jobs. They lavished them with gifts and essentially gave many an entitlement attitude. The speaking problem is from computers. And the mindset about entry level jobs I think came from watching TV where depictions of work were always glamorized. White people didn't "work", they sat in corner offices and went to lunch meetings! An unpaid internship at a corporate office was fine. But doing maintenance or running a register? "Not my kid!".

    The concept of getting a car given to you as a teenager was foreign to most of my employees back then. And many of them went to prestigious private schools. They drove old Saabs and cars like that, at best. Most drove junkers and econoboxes. This need for money is what drove them to work harder, do better in school, and without that need you are going to slack off and fuck around a lot.
     
  14. nserafini

    nserafini Well-Known Member

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    College loans are fucking crazy. But they should ride on your back, not your parents.

    My kids have 3 choices. Scholarships, the military, or find jobs. The same ones my dad gave me. And BTW, I took get a job. I make more than most people older than me with a 4 yr degree. Know why? Because I put in 120%.
     
  15. Captain

    Captain Alto, Blanco y Guapo Gold

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    --------------------------

    That's an excellent point: When I was in college (way, way, long time ago in the 1980s), in state tuition in Wisconsin was $600 or so a semester for UW Madison. I think minimum wage at the time was something like 3.00 an hour. Do the math, and it was possible for a minimum wage worker to pay the tuition. Flash forward to the present and it is now around $5,000. But minimum wage is not $30.00 per hour. It's even worse here in California. Take our flagship: UC Berkeley:

    "Tuition at the University of California, Berkeley, was about $700 a year back in the 1970s. Today, U.C. Berkeley students have to fork over around $15,000 per year. That's a 2,000 percent increase." http://www.npr.org/2011/10/19/141505658/why-is-college-so-expensive

    This is for a public university. Private universities are even more expensive. Why even bother working for minimum wage if you are going to have to take out a huge loan anyway? At best, you are earning your rent or book money. You are better off doing a free internship at a brokerage firm or a law firm with the hope that your connections and networking will land you a post-graduate job.
     
  16. hollywoodrose

    hollywoodrose Member VIP

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    That's not even $300 a week, and that's before taxes. If you work all year, 40 hours a week that will barely be $10k. When I fill up my tank it's over $60 just for that. When the gap between the rich and poor gets to a certain point a society begins to go to hell. When you think that on the other hand, you have people like the wig who have more than they could spend in 200 lifetimes and they still complain that they don't have enough, you can see how ridiculous it is. People can get as rich as they want, but when the rich come to completely own the system and stack the deck (deregulation, oligopolies, monopolies and "consolidation", outsourcing and "globalization" etc) you no longer have a system where people can consistently make a good living.



    All the old middle class jobs are sent out to sweatshops and developing countries, the corporations (lead by the bankers) consolidate and take greater control of the government and the politicians end up destroying their own country. In the end you have a small group of billionaires in a service-driven economy, served by a slave class of low paid americans. I think a lot of people - including kids - see this is a losing proposition. We end up back in the "old system", which is ultimately what the elite want. If the bankers and corporations can't be controlled, they'll grow up around the american people like weeds and strangle them. That's roughly what the founding fathers said about the future that we're now living in, which was made possible by loopholes in our original constitution.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2014
  17. FishySausage

    FishySausage Original Nuttah VIP Gold

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    No one can give more than 100%. It's a mathematical impossibility
     
  18. check1

    check1 VIP Extreme Gold

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    I have a lot of stuff I'd rather be doing too. I could easily fill everyday for the rest of my life on my hobbies alone.
    No way in fuck my kids won't have jobs as teens. One of them can't wait (11 now)...he wants the $$$.
     
  19. check1

    check1 VIP Extreme Gold

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    It's 110% impossible.
     
  20. R.P. McMurphy

    R.P. McMurphy Well-Known Member

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    ...i started working when i was 11. i worked at a motel cleaning the pool keeping the property clean, mowing the lawns, stocking the linen room for the maids. then at 13 i flipped burgers because i wanted a set of ludwig drums so bad i could taste it.