And it seems to be starting, as predicted

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by SouthernListen, Sep 18, 2014.

  1. SouthernListen

    SouthernListen I don't follow the crowd. Sorry about that. VIP

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    http://www.politico.com/magazine/st...em-110918.html?ml=m_u5_1#.VBb6KfldV8E?ml=m_mm

    Is It Time to Ditch the Star-Spangled Banner?
    By TED WIDMER


    September 13, 2014



    The Star-Spangled Banner, so often a prelude to our ceremonies for others, finds itself on center stage this weekend as Baltimore, the city of its birth, celebrates the national anthem’s bicentennial. There will be fireworks, jet flyovers, and—one can hope—an impromptu off-key rendering by Vice President Joe Biden, the guest of honor.

    The story of the song’s composition is well known, and nearly as sacrosanct as the 36’ by 42’ flag that inspired it, a beloved relic in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. Two hundred years ago, a Maryland-born lawyer, Francis Scott Key, poured out his anxious feelings for the fate of his country. Having witnessed the shelling of Fort McHenry by British forces throughout the night of Sept. 13-14, 1814, Key was elated to see the American flag still flying the next morning. He wrote out four stanzas of a poem titled “Defence of Fort M’Henry,” which was quickly published as a broadside and set to a well-known tune. The rest, as they say, is history.

    Except that history is never quite as linear as we want it to be. In the case of the Star-Spangled Banner, the story quickly finds back alleys worthy of 18th-century London, where the music was actually composed. Indeed, the invading army that shelled Baltimore that night has nearly as much claim to authorship as the composer, for the tune was likely brought to America by British soldiers at the time of the American Revolution. It has been testing our vocal chords and our eardrums ever since.


    Indeed, from its murky origins, the song has become so ubiquitous that it’s difficult not to hear it. In the early days of television, it was the music that terminated the day’s broadcasts, in those distant years when broadcasts mercifully ended. Its martial strains launch every sporting contest, adding a kind of athletic drama of its own, as local singers labor to reach the higher notes most of us have no chance of hitting. Each performance forces us to relive Key’s emotional trauma during that long night 200 years ago, as we grimace our way through the rough patches of “the rocket’s red glare” and the “bombs bursting in air.” From high school graduations to retirement ceremonies, it is the soundtrack of our lives, a kind of musical bombardment that endlessly perpetuates Key’s agony of waiting and watching.

    Surprisingly, the sacred music comes from an organization that was anything but. “The Anacreontic Song,” or “To Anacreon in Heav’n,” was a popular bit of music in the United States when Key wrote his lyrics. In fact, Key had already set an earlier piece of music to it, a celebration of two American war heroes returning from North Africa. The song was composed in the mid-1770s for a London club, the Anacreontic Society, which named itself after Anacreon, a Greek poet who worshipped “the Muses, Wine and Love.” The Anacreontic Society did its best to live up to those goals, and the singing of loud drunken songs was an essential purpose of the organization. One witness complained that “the proceedings were very disgraceful to the Society; as the greatest levity, and vulgar obscenity, generally prevailed.” Ironically, one of its leading spirits was a British Army officer, Sir Richard Hankey, who was sent to quell the Americans, rebelling at precisely that moment. The music is usually attributed to an English composer, John Stafford Smith, but some uncertainty persists despite prodigious attempts by American bibliographers to nail it down.

    Once it was written out, and spread through cheap songbooks, “Anacreon in Heaven” became popular on both sides of the Atlantic, and creative Americans often adapted the music to other words. At least 85 alternate versions are known to have been published between 1790 and 1818, many of which celebrated drinking. In 1793, the tune was recast as a “Song for the Glorious Fourteenth of July,” in celebration of Bastille Day. Yes, our national anthem was briefly an ode to “the genius of France.”

    The story of the lyrics is more straightforward. We know that Key wrote out his lines after the battle, and that they were quickly published, and found immediate popularity in a country desperate for good news after the British had torched Washington. But the third stanza is troubling. One line taunts the British for their failure, and specifically calls out “the hireling and slave” who joined the British forces. That line calls attention to a fact that considerably weakens the song’s claim to celebrate “the land of the free”—the presence of significant numbers of African-Americans, fighting with the British in hopes of finding a personal freedom they had no chance of securing in the United States. Among the invading army were at least 200 “colonial marines”—escaped slaves from Virginia and Maryland, eager to fight against their former masters.



    Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/st...ner-national-anthem-110918.html#ixzz3De8wIdiZ
     
  2. MyLazyHand

    MyLazyHand Russia and France Know What to Do

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    The Socialist Workers' Anthem is a better choice for our current government.
     
  3. 1Vegasgirl

    1Vegasgirl Well-Known Member VIP Gold

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    These people are unbelievable. So intolerant and yet they accuse others.
     
  4. reno

    reno VIP Extreme Gold

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    The way it's going, just use The Mexican Hat Dance.
     
  5. HorsetoothBeth

    HorsetoothBeth Well-Known Member

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    2015: "Mommy, we learned a new song in class today!"
    2020: "Gentleman please rise. Ladies remain silent and seated for your national anthem!"


     
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  6. BrerJimmy

    BrerJimmy Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but for absolutely none of the reasons stated in the article.

    I don't go to sporting events with any attention of stating my national allegiance. I go to get blackout drunk, watch people do things I physically can't, watch said people injure and maim one another, and check the cheerleaders for cameltoe.

    If the ticket says tip-off is at 7:05, why am I watching some little red-haired cunt from the local production of Annie singing a 200-year old song at 7:06. Get off the court, twat.

    And let's get that pledge of allegiance out of schools, while were at it. Starting off in kindergarten, it's ridiculous to ask children to recite an allegiance they can't possibly understand. It's a mild form of brain-washing. Maybe if we spent as much time on science class as we do on rituals and pageantry, China wouldn't be kicking the shit out of our dick.

    That in turn would create an honest and unforced sense of national pride and maybe people would stop complaining about your stupid song before the Bears game.
     
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  7. Reggae Mistress

    Reggae Mistress Old Catcher's Mitt

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    You should write for both Hallmark and ESPN
     
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  8. 1Vegasgirl

    1Vegasgirl Well-Known Member VIP Gold

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    They should understand. If they don't, then they are not being taught our American history.:salute:
     
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  9. BrerJimmy

    BrerJimmy Well-Known Member

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    This story seems on-topic...

    http://uproxx.com/webculture/2014/0...ous-literature-to-florida-public-school-kids/

    The last time we talked about the Satanic Temple, they were showing off their bad ass statue from Oklahoma. This time, they shift their focus to Florida and Orange County’s new rules on allowing religious literature to be distributed on school grounds. An atheist group sued the school district to ensure that all beliefs (or lack of) could have a place under the new rules, but now they’ve opened the door for the Satanic Temple to move in. The Temple released a statement on September 15 that outlines their plans to provide the schools in Orange County with their own reading material:

    The Satanic Temple’s spokesperson, Lucien Greaves, explains, “We would never seek to establish a precedent of disseminating our religious materials in public schools because we believe our constitutional values are better served by respecting a strong separation of Church and State. However, if a public school board is going to allow religious pamphlets and full Bibles to be distributed to students — as is the case in Orange County, Florida — we think the responsible thing to do is to ensure that these students are given access to a variety of differing religious opinions, as opposed to standing idly by while one religious voice dominates the discourse and delivers propaganda to youth.”

    Who hasn’t wanted a Satanic coloring workbook to help pass the time between classes? You wouldn’t have to tell me twice, even if I’d be disappointed after finding out that their tenets are no different than basic common sense and understanding.

    I just wonder why there is always such a focus on getting religion back in the classroom as opposed to improving the actual education you’re there to receive. Handing out Bibles is not going to do anything but give people ammo to hit each other with said Bibles.
     
  10. BrerJimmy

    BrerJimmy Well-Known Member

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    They're five. They don't understand how to wipe their own asses. They just learned the stove was hot last week.

    Asking them to understand jingoism, pride, and objective thought might be a bit of a stretch.
     
  11. peterfonda

    peterfonda Well-Known Member

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    I always thought "God Bless America" would have made a better anthem anyway.