Sports Another Dead ex NBA Player...sheesh

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by TallTyrion, Sep 16, 2015.

  1. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    First Darryl Dawkins, then Moses Malone...now Caldwell Jones? Cornbread Maxwell better start living right @ARM
    When does it end?
    Caldwell Jones, Shot-Blocking Basketball Star, Dies at 64
    By BRUCE WEBERSEPT. 23, 2014

    Caldwell Jones, a beanpole of a center and power forward who blocked more than 2,200 shots in his 17-year pro career and played in three National Basketball Association finals with the Philadelphia 76ers, died on Sunday in Stockbridge, Ga. He was 64.
    His wife, Vanessa, confirmed the death. She said he was at a driving range near their home when he had a heart attack.
    Lithe and quick at 6 feet 11 and 217 pounds, Jones was best known as a rebounder and a shot blocker, but he had ball skills as well. With a smooth, slithery move to the basket, a fluid hook shot and a reliable short-range jumper, he shot better than 47 percent for his career, and he was even asked on occasion to bring the ball upcourt.
    Early in his career, he played three seasons for four teams in the old American Basketball Association and averaged almost 16 points per game, but when he joined the 76ers of the N.B.A. in 1976, he was no longer depended on to score. Over the next six seasons, he was a frontcourt defensive specialist playing alongside powerhouse offensive stars like Julius Erving, George McGinnis and Darryl Dawkins.
    His size and speed gave him rare versatility on defense: Sometimes his duty was to guard a big man in the middle like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and sometimes it was to shadow a scorer in perpetual motion like Larry Bird.
    As a Sixer, Jones was twice named to the all-N.B.A. defensive team. He was a crucial cog on a squad that reached the championship finals in 1977 — they lost in six games to a Portland Trail Blazers team led by Bill Walton — and in 1980 and 1982, losing six-game series both times to Abdul-Jabbar’s Los Angeles Lakers.
    Caldwell Jones Jr. was born on Aug. 4, 1950, in McGehee, Ark., where his parents, Caldwell Sr. and Cecelia Jones, were cotton farmers. They had a girl and seven boys, four of whom — Charles, Wilbert and Major, in addition to Caldwell — played in the N.B.A.
    From 1969 to 1973, Jones attended Albany State College (now Albany State University) in Georgia, where he and his brothers commandeered a whole chapter of school basketball history. Six of the Jones brothers played center for Albany State — from 1961 to 1979 one Jones or another was the big man in the middle — and Oliver Jones went on to become the head coach of the team for 28 years, retiring in 2000.
    In his rookie year in the A.B.A., playing for the San Diego Conquistadors (where his coach was Wilt Chamberlain), Caldwell Jones led the league in blocked shots. The franchise subsequently went out of business, but before the two leagues merged in 1976, Jones also played for the San Diego Sails, the Kentucky Colonels and the Spirits of St. Louis.
    In the N.B.A., after six years with the 76ers, he was sent to the Houston Rockets, where his brother Major was a teammate. He later played for the Chicago Bulls during Michael Jordan’s rookie year, spent four seasons with the Trail Blazers and retired in 1990 after a year with the San Antonio Spurs, helping to school their young center David Robinson in the ways of pro ball.
    For his career, Jones scored more than 10,000 points, grabbed more than 10,000 rebounds and averaged 1.8 blocks per game over nearly 1,300 games.
    In 1992, Jones married Vanessa Dorton, a school administrator whom he had met in Portland. In addition to her, he is survived by five brothers, Clint, Oliver, Charles, Wilbert and Major; and five daughters, Tanasha Polk and Jasmine, Zori, Maya and Leah Jones.
    Jones was widely respected among players and sportswriters as a genial, thoughtful and witty presence off the court and a self-sacrificing one on it. After the Sixers had lost for a second time in the championship finals to the Lakers, the team sent Jones and a first-round draft pick to Houston as compensation for their signing of the free-agent center Moses Malone. It was bad luck for Jones: Malone led the team to a championship in 1983, sweeping the Lakers in the finals.
    Months later, however, in recognition of Jones’s contribution to the team, the 76ers coach, Billy Cunningham, offered Jones his own championship ring. Jones turned him down.
    “He epitomized a team player,” Cunningham said, after Jones’s death, to the Philadelphia sportswriter Gordie Jones (no relation) on the website CSNPhilly.com. “If we won, he would have been the happiest guy in the locker room. And that’s not just a statement, like you hear things, nice things, being said about somebody who is deceased. That’s fact.”
     
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  2. Beer Chugger

    Beer Chugger Well-Known Member

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    All 3 playing much of their careers for the Sixers. Asbestos in the Philly Arena?

    Someone check on Dr. J, stat
     
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  3. greenchiclets

    greenchiclets Well-Known Member

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    Goodnight Giantman.
     
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  4. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    Isn't Bobby Jones dead too?
     
  5. johnfreeman1

    johnfreeman1 Well-Known Member

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    He died a year ago?
     
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  6. MyLazyHand

    MyLazyHand Russia and France Know What to Do

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    OP has been time traveling.
     
  7. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    I just woke up. disregard.
     
  8. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    Cornbread Maxwell still better beware
     
  9. johnfreeman1

    johnfreeman1 Well-Known Member

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    Say no more
     
  10. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    I'm normally way funnier. Need a cup of coffee.
     
  11. MyLazyHand

    MyLazyHand Russia and France Know What to Do

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    You must've been Googling or clicking on the "related stories" link when you were reading about another player.
     
  12. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    no, it popped up on my freaking news feed and I didn't even think.
     
  13. ARM

    ARM Well-Known Member

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    Caldwell was quite famous enough to get the kind of play Moses and Dawkins did.

    He really was a sad blurb when he passed and got gobbled up by other news stories. Roy Tarpley (Roy Marble), Kevin Duckworth, and my namesake ARMon Gilliam had the same unceremonious good bye.
     
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  14. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    well, at least we still have Cornbread Maxwell, Derrick Coleman and Benoit Benjamin to kick around.
     
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  15. Robert Higgins

    Robert Higgins Well-Known Member VIP

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    Get that shit out of here

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. ARM

    ARM Well-Known Member

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    I'm at a point where if I'm those guys and their ilk (a black guy over 45 years old as well as 6'7" and 235 lbs) - I'm at a point where I'm afraid to go to sleep or I won't wake up tomorrow.

    It's like this NBA power forward/center heart and cholesterol serial killer running around now with....

    Moses Malone (6-10)
    Darryl Dawkins (6-11)
    Wayman Tisdale (listed from 6-7 to 6-9)
    Jerome Kersey (6-7)
    Roy Tarpley (6-11)
    Armon Gilliam (6-9)
    Maurice Lucas (6-9)
    Caldwell Jones (6-11)
    Kevin Duckworth (6-11)
    Mel Turpin (6-11)
    Anthony Mason (6-6/6-7)

    etc..

    ALL on it's hit-list.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2015
  17. TallTyrion

    TallTyrion Triggered like a mofo VIP

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    Is Chris Washburn still alive?

    I'm 6'7 and just under 3 bucks. I need to be careful lol. Actually, I'm probably doomed.
     
    ARM likes this.
  18. RobotsVsMonsters

    RobotsVsMonsters Semi-lurker since 2008

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    Now that's funny
     
  19. ARM

    ARM Well-Known Member

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    You're not BLACK though, it's different. In the black community there's this much higher rate and risk of heart disease.....

    Why Are African-Americans at Greater Risk for Heart Disease?
    African-Americans are at higher risk for heart disease, yet they're less likely to get the care they need.
    By Katherine Kam
    WebMD Magazine - Feature
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    This article is from the WebMD Archive
    WebMD archives content after 2 years to ensure our readers can easily find the most timely content.

    Heart disease has haunted generations of Robin Drummond's family. "I have a family history of heart disease on both sides," says the 55-year-old African-American and resident of Hammond, La. "I've had uncles, aunts, and grandparents who've died from heart attacks and heart disease, and two of my mother's brothers died four months apart. One had a heart attack in church, and four months later, one had a heart attack in the post office."

    When Drummond's father succumbed to heart disease at age 50, she was shaken. "Particularly when my dad died, I wanted to make sure that I was OK," she says. In 2002, she went to her doctor for testing and learned that her heart was mildly enlarged, placing her at risk for heart failure. Drummond, a registered dietitian, took strenuous measures to ward off trouble. But not all African-Americans are aware of the danger.



    high blood pressure (also called hypertension), chronic kidney disease, being overweight, and having low levels of HDL, the "good" cholesterol. Three-fourths of African-Americans who develop heart failure have high blood pressure by age 40.

    African-Americans and Health Care
    To prevent heart failure and other heart disease, it's crucial to treat risk factors successfully, says Anne L. Taylor, MD, a professor of medicine at New York Presbyterian Hospital and vice dean of academic affairs at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons. But, compared with their white peers, African-Americans often have less access to health care, she says. Not only are they less likely to visit a doctor and get routine screenings, but they're less likely to be referred to specialists.
     
  20. ARM

    ARM Well-Known Member

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    Washburn is a GOOD one but he's still alive and cleaned himself up doing repentant work. I heard him on NBA Radio like 5 months ago.