Beware ! Dawg Can Read Your Mind

Discussion in 'The Bar' started by GSD, Oct 21, 2011.

  1. GSD

    GSD Active Member

    Reputations:
    -156
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Messages:
    5,264
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG]

    http://science-techvilla.blogspot.com/2011/07/study-expalians-dog-thinking-behavoiur.html

    Dog owners often attest to their canine companion's seeming ability to read their minds. How do dogs they learn to beg for food or behave badly primarily when we're not looking? According to Monique Udell and her team, from the University of Florida in the US, the way that dogs come to respond to the level of people's attentiveness tells us something about the ways dogs think and learn about human behavior. Their research, published online in Springer's journalLearning & Behavior, suggests it is down to a combination of specific cues, context and previous experience.


    Recent work has identified a remarkable range of human-like social behaviors in the domestic dog, including their ability to respond to human body language, verbal commands, and to attentional states. The question is, how do they do it? Do dogs infer humans' mental states by observing their appearance and behavior under various circumstances and then respond accordingly? Or do they learn from experience by responding to environmental cues, the presence or absence of certain stimuli, or even human behavioral cues? Udell and colleagues' work sheds some light on these questions.

    Udell and team carried out two experiments comparing the performance of pet domestic dogs, shelter dogs and wolves given the opportunity to beg for food, from either an attentive person or from a person unable to see the animal. They wanted to know whether the rearing and living environment of the animal (shelter or human home), or the species itself (dog or wolf), had the greater impact on the animal's performance.

    They showed, for the first time that wolves, like domestic dogs, are capable of begging successfully for food by approaching the attentive human. This demonstrates that both species -- domesticated and non-domesticated -- have the capacity to behave in accordance with a human's attentional state. In addition, both wolves and pet dogs were able to rapidly improve their performance with practice.

    The authors also found that dogs were not sensitive to all visual cues of a human's attention in the same way. In particular, dogs from a home environment rather than a shelter were more sensitive to stimuli predicting attentive humans. Those dogs with less regular exposure to humans performed badly on the begging task.

    According to the researchers, "These results suggest that dogs' ability to follow human actions stems from a willingness to accept humans as social companions, combined with conditioning to follow the limbs and actions of humans to acquire reinforcement. The type of attentional cues, the context in which the command is presented, and previous experience are all important."
     
  2. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

    Reputations:
    199,023
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    Messages:
    85,566
    Likes Received:
    16,700
    I sawr a nova special about the history of dogs. It's quite remarkable how they can cue in on human emotion. They actually exhibit behaviors towards humans that they don't exhibit with other dogs.

    For example: They showed that when humans look at other human faces we primarily look to the right side of the face for emotional cues. They were able to prove that dogs do the same when looking at human faces but not when looking at other dogs.

    Another thing that dogs can interpret is pointing. They showed that dogs respond to pointing at objects. Even Our closest releative the chimp doesn't respond to pointing. They also showed that Dogs are so in tune with our facial expressions that they knew what object to go to just by looking at an object.

    I recommend the special if you should come across it.
     
  3. Vyb

    Vyb serial chiller Gold

    Reputations:
    7,050
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    43,535
    Likes Received:
    1,302
    My dog MUST know I hate it when he whines, but he fucking does it anyway.
     
  4. Bye You!

    Bye You! The n word guy Gold

    Reputations:
    339,535
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Messages:
    79,567
    Likes Received:
    41,529
    dog schmog...cats rule! :cat: :kitty:

    and my cats do the same exact things.
     
  5. Bye You!

    Bye You! The n word guy Gold

    Reputations:
    339,535
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Messages:
    79,567
    Likes Received:
    41,529
  6. Bro

    Bro Oligarchical Corporatocracy VIP Gold

    Reputations:
    199,023
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    Messages:
    85,566
    Likes Received:
    16,700
    :winner: Yes!

    Here is a sample of the trascript of reading human faces.

    DANIEL MILLS: One of the theories is that maybe our emotions are more faithfully presented in the right side of our face, and that's the side that we tune in to.

    And when we look at a face, we have what's known as a natural left-gaze bias, so you naturally look much more towards the left, i.e. the right-hand side, of somebody's face.

    NARRATOR: Eye-tracking software demonstrates that, when presented with a human face, we nearly always look left first. Daniel Mills wants to find out if dogs use the same trick to read human faces.

    DANIEL MILLS: Shifting the direction of your gaze, we thought, was fairly unique to people, until we started looking at dogs.

    ANAÃÂS RACCA (University of Lincoln, England): Taz! Tazy!

    NARRATOR: To test the theory, his team recreates this experiment with dogs.

    ANAÃÂS RACCA: Moose, what's that?

    NARRATOR: They present a series of images showing human faces, dog faces and inanimate objects and record the direction of a dog's gaze with a video camera.

    ANAÃÂS RACCA: We found that dogs, when they are looking at pictures of dog faces or objects, they will look randomly on the left or the right.

    NARRATOR: But, when it comes to human faces, they make a remarkable discovery.

    ANAÃÂS RACCA: So now we have Taz looking at a human face. So, first she's looking in the middle of the screen, and here is the first eye movements on the left. She's in the middle and she's going on the left.

    So, now, this is Moose, and then we can see really well that this is a left gaze; from here to here. We can see the white here. She's even moving her head.

    NARRATOR: Does this mean dogs can read human emotions? As far as we know, no other animal has this relationship with the human face. And dogs don't do this with each other. This suggests that dogs have acquired a new skill enabling them to communicate with us on an emotional level.