Brody recovery thread!

Discussion in 'The Bar' started by Caster Fly, Jul 19, 2013.

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How should bad dogs be killed?

  1. With Fire

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  2. Drowning

    0 vote(s)
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  3. Shot (taken care of)

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  4. Put down by vet

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    Oh, never mind. :sad:
     
  2. ChuckZ

    ChuckZ You're so pusillanimous, oh yea.

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  3. BrulesRules

    BrulesRules Just grab 'em in the biscuits Gold

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  4. beatlejaws

    beatlejaws nowhere poster

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  5. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    I'm leaning towards kill with fire, but I was wondering why retraining wasn't an option first, Lemmy, your expert non butt hurt opinion? :bigthink
     
  6. RobinsBedSores

    RobinsBedSores VIP Extreme Gold

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    This is in poor taste.
     
  7. BrulesRules

    BrulesRules Just grab 'em in the biscuits Gold

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    this thread does seem very mean spirited...it was posted to illicit a negative response. Rule 10 Violation!
     
  8. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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  9. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    Thanks for the opinion, is killing a bad dog and posting about it in bad taste?
     
  10. RobinsBedSores

    RobinsBedSores VIP Extreme Gold

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    Too soon, mean-spirited, hateful, no reason except to arouse the lowest common denominator of the audience, etc...
     
  11. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    When you post that you killed your dog for acting like a dog, what responses are expected from dog owners? :dontknow:
     
  12. RobinsBedSores

    RobinsBedSores VIP Extreme Gold

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    You should apologize to Lemmy.
     
  13. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    You didn't answer. :coffee:

    I use the same barometer the pile on gang of the bar does when deciding what's fun and funny. The ol sooner or later it's a topic I care about rule.

    Lemmy gets it, he's a "Douchebag Extraordinaire" and prides himself in the way he fucks with people. :c

    Only lately, he don't seem to be able to hang. :console:

    Pesky anger.
     
  14. RobinsBedSores

    RobinsBedSores VIP Extreme Gold

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    Lemmy protects us and our freedoms daily and you chose to make light of a terrible situation in his life. I'm not amused.
     
  15. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    You should chastise him for killing a dog. :c

    I think we disagree.
     
  16. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    I suggest you stop reading then, words hurt.

    Lemmy is a dog killing scumbag and I give no quarter to dog killing scumbags.
     
  17. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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  18. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    http://animal.discovery.com/pets/how-to-train-a-dog.htm

    [h=2]DOG CARE[/h]


    [h=1]How to Train a Dog[/h]By Dr. William Fortney
    Comments




    Among the many important responsibilities dog owners have, training a dog is among the most important. Well-trained pets are easier to care for and love, cause less damage to your home (and theirs), and live happier lives. In this article, we cover many of the basics of dog training. But we also cover some important facets of dogs themselves -- which you need to be familiar with in order to communicate with your pooch.These include how dogs communicate to you through body language and noises. Dogs send myriad messages with their bodies and their voices -- this is one reason why they're so fascinating and beloved. The more you understand their messages, the more you understand them and how your own messages are being understood. Read this entire article carefully -- there are three sections after this one -- and then put the wisdom into practice. Here's what we'll cover:
    Understanding a Dog's Body Language
    Dogs use their entire body to communicate. Their eyes and ears are especially dynamic, and they give sure-fire clues to dogs' emotions and impulses. How dogs tilt their heads, move their legs and torsos, wag (or raise or drop) their tails -- all these things contribute to the messages being sent. In this section, we cover many of the silent messages your pooch will give you, from his nose to his tail.
    Interpreting Dog Barks and Noises
    Dogs are probably the most "verbally" expressive of all domesticated animals, and this only adds to their charm. From the whine of a puppy to the angry growl of an adult, dogs mean what they say. The more you understand these signals, the happier you and your dog will be. At the same time, it's important to know which noises constitute an annoyance, and how to train your dog to stop making them. We'll offer suggestions on teaching a dog to stop barking in this section.
    Dog-Training Tips
    It's important to know not only how to train a dog, but what to train it to do. Puppies have no sense of correct behavior, so they offer a million things you could correct; which should you address? In this section, we'll cover what to correct as well as how to train a pooch. We'll also discuss dog obediences classes -- also known as puppy kindergarten -- and specific thing you can teach your dog if you plan on traveling with it. Life tosses up myriad challenges to a dog's sense of obedience, and the more he's trained to understand, the happier you both will be. Finally, for fun and practical benefit, we'll cover a few basic tricks you can teach your dog. They're a wonderful way to bond with your pet and to entertain the both of you, while teaching it how to behave and react to your commands. Everybody wins!

    AND LIVES!
     
  19. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    [h=1]Why You Should Never Hit Your Dog[/h]Posted by Ross Pomeroy at Tue, 02 Jul 2013 01:18:50

    "Bad dog! Bad dog!"

    Even if you're not a dog owner, I'd wager you've heard that aplenty. The firm admonishment is occasionally accompanied by the choking yank of a leash or the stinging whack of a newspaper, and often followed by the guilty canine whimpering down or scurrying away, its tail between its legs. Fido has learned his lesson, its owner might think.

    But it probably hasn't.

    A select breed of dog trainers, including Cesar Millan, the "Dog Whisperer" on National Geographic Channel, actively recommends the use of what's called positive punishment. This is the classic Skinnerian notion in which a stimulus is applied with the aim of reducing an unwanted behavior.

    For example, say you don't want your dog to jump up on visitors. The next time he jumps up on somebody, you could give him a strong slap on the muzzle in the hopes that he will associate the pain with the behavior. Thus, he will be less inclined to jump up on people. Millan euphemistically terms such punishment as "discipline."

    "Make sure you offer your dog the complete package when you bring him into your world,"encourages a blog post on his website. "Along with exercise, food, shelter, and affection, offer him a healthy dose of rules, boundaries, and discipline. Don't think of discipline as punishment, but just one more gift you give your best friend to keep him happy and balanced," the post proclaims in a sweet, yet eerily dystopian fashion.

    [​IMG]But there are a lot of problems with positive punishment. Chiefly, it's not very specific. Dog trainer Pat Miller describes this pitfall in her book The Power of Positive Dog Training. Here's the summary: Say your puppy pees on the living room carpet. Angered, you yell and bark at the piddling pup, causing him to dash away. Congratulations, Miller says, you've successfully scared your dog. But all you've communicated is that he shouldn't pee in front of you or on the living room carpet. Next time, he might simply urinate on a different carpet. The lesson that you wanted to impart -- "don't pee in the house" -- has not been related. Moreover, pioneering research in 1968 conducted by Richard Solomon at the University of Pennsylvania showed that unless you catch and punish the dog in the act, it's unlikely that he will take away any message at all. He will, however, learn to be afraid... of you.

    There's no question that if carried out swiftly positive punishment can effectively reduce undesirable behaviors, but it will also give rise to two unwanted side effects: fear and aggression. In 2009, researchers at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvaniadistributed a survey (PDF) to owners who previously brought in their canines to address aggression problems. On the anonymous questionnaire, owners were asked to outline the training methods they had used with their dogs in the past and also to describe their dog's response. Animal behaviorist and University of Wisconsin professor Patricia McConnelldescribes the results on her blog:

    The most confrontational, and I would argue, aggressive, behaviors on the part of the owners resulted in the highest levels of aggressive responses from the dogs. 43% of dogs responded with aggression to being hit or kicked, 38% to having an owner grab their mouth and take out an object forcefully, 36% to having a muzzle put on (or attempted?), 29% to a "dominance down," 26% to a jowl or scruff shake.
    "Violence begets violence, aggression begets aggression," McConnell added. Her conclusion is corroborated by additional studies. In 2008, Belgian scientists analyzed the performance of thirty-three dog-handling teams in the Belgian military. They found that the dogs classified as "low-performance" were punished more often than "high-performance" dogs. These sanctions included abrasive leash pulls and hanging the dogs by their collars. The following year,researchers from the U.K. detailed the findings of a study that examined dogs kept in shelters, discovering that attempts by humans to assert dominance over canines resulted in increased aggression.

    [​IMG]"We should be teaching our dogs, rather than forcing and threatening them," McConnell urges.

    This means trading in rolled-up newspapers for dog treats, roaring yells for happy praise, and hard smacks for soft pats. Positive punishment becomes positive reinforcement, where good behavior is rewarded rather than bad behavior being punished. Writing at LiveScience, Lynne Peeples describes a key study that compared the two methods, with positive reinforcement clearly coming out on top:

    In February 2004, a paper in Animal Welfare by Elly Hiby and colleagues at the University of Bristol compared the relative effectiveness of positive and punitive methods for the first time. The dogs became more obedient the more they were trained using rewards. When they were punished, on the other hand, the only significant change was a corresponding rise in the number of bad behaviors.
    Cesar Millan's "discipline" approach may produce seemingly miraculous results on television. But in the real world, it's neither effective nor substantiated.

    (Images: 1. Scary Black Dog via Shutterstock 2. Walking the Dog via Shutterstock)
     
  20. Caster Fly

    Caster Fly New Member Banned User

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    Learn this - Never kill the dog
    By BARRY KOLTNOW
    Knight-Ridder


    Never kill the dog.
    Kill as many humans as you like, but never kill the dog. Destroy homes, farms and office buildings, but never kill the dog. Wipe out cities, obliterate countries, annihilate entire planets but never kill the dog.


    Learn this lesson, and you, too, can make a disaster movie.


    Roland Emmerich, who directed ''Independence Day,'' said, ''You never kill the dog,'' without a second thought.


    Director Rob Cohen, before the opening of the Sylvester Stallone disaster film ''Daylight,'' said without a smile, ''You never kill the dog.''


    Just before the release of ''Twister,'' director Jan DeBont was asked why he made sure that the dog lived through the disaster.
    ''You never kill the dog,'' he said matter-of-factly.


    Now the volcano disaster film ''Dante's Peak'' is on screens and, sure enough, there is a lovable dog in the movie that gets swept up in the holocaust ignited by the eruption of the volcano. For a few tense moments, we are unsure of the dog's fate.
    Does the dog survive? What do you think?


    But making a big-budget disaster film is not as simple as following the one simple rule: Never kill the dog.


    There are several rules that make up the disaster-film formula, and since these movies are back in vogue, it's time to lay down the rules. Once you know the rules of the road, you can enjoy the ride.


    Of course, all disaster movies have the requisite hero and damsel in distress. That's so obvious it's not even a rule.


    But you can bet the mortgage that the hero will have a boss or co-worker or competitor who believes that the hero's warnings are bogus and therefore spends most of the movie trying to thwart the hero's efforts.


    This antagonist will have a revelation just before being devoured by whatever disaster is being featured in the movie. In some films, he'll have enough time to admit his mistake to the hero, but usually, he'll just give a knowing look as he is about to die, just so the audience understands that he knew he was wrong.


    At some point, the hero will try to outrun, either on foot or in a vehicle, a wall of water, flames, tractors, whatever. For some reason, he will successfully outdistance the onrushing doom, even though in a previous scene he told someone that, ''When this thing hits, it will be moving at 200 miles an hour.''


    A lovable older person will bite the dust. Shelley Winters established this rule in ''The Poseidon Adventure,'' and now just about every disaster film follows suit. Apparently, it is OK to kill a senior citizen in a movie as long as their dog doesn't die.


    We'll get to meet a nice group of technical wizards in the movie, who will teach us about the latest equipment being used to battle this particular type of calamity. We'll admire all of them and learn about their jobs, but we'll grow especially fond of one shy, nerdy guy who starts to come out of his shell just before being killed doing some heroic act that saves all his friends. But his dog will be spared.