Caging a dog

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Barton Fink, Oct 2, 2015.

  1. Barton Fink

    Barton Fink Well-Known Member

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    I got good advice here on my last dog thread, so i'm going back to the well.


    Howard related because animoes....


    What is the deal with caging? Is it only for training? I always thought it was just for the first few weeks, but everything I am reading says keep the dog in the cage overnight forever.

    My wife is wanting that to be a condition of getting the dog, but it sound crazy to me.

    Any thoughts?
     
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  2. Barton Fink

    Barton Fink Well-Known Member

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    LaserT likes this.
  3. LaserT

    LaserT You have to have fun. Gold

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    Tweet Beth. She's a "top U.S. animal expert" according to her bio. ;)


    In all honesty, I just caged my dogs when they were younger when I left home and to train them. I never cage them at night anymore.
     
  4. Pothead

    Pothead Well-Known Member

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    I'd never do it, but apparently once they're 'kennel-trained," it's not a big deal.
     
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  5. chapped

    chapped Well-Known Member

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    i adopted my German Shepherd when she was 6 months old

    i am not a cage kind of guy but she clearly had been trained and loves her ME time

    i don't have a cage set up for her .. so she will go into my guest bathroom and close the door at night

    of coarse i have to let her out in the mourning but yea
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2015
  6. Rescued Owl

    Rescued Owl VIP Extreme Gold

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    They are supposed to like the feeling of having a confined, safe place to sleep.
    I have a golden retriever and when she was a puppy we kept the crate closed at night. Once we knew she could make it through the night without going to the bathroom we just left the door open. She always went in there on her own when we went to bed. Didn't take too long for her to outgrow the crate but she still sleeps in kind of tight spaces.
     
  7. kingofallmessicans

    kingofallmessicans Sandy Cunt

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    I have an English Bulldog and I did crate-training for the first few weeks. The crate then became the kitchen area enclosed by a baby-gate. Bulldogs are loud fucking sleepers dude. You and the wife will probably want him sleeping in another room. Bulldogs are fucking hilarious, stubborn as fuck, and pretty dumb, even by dog-standards. They are also real-life bullies. When I take my fatty to the dog park, he'll steal a toy from a smaller dog, then drop it in front of that dog, daring him to challenge him and pick it up.

    If it's a reputable owner, meet the parents and judge their dispositions. Bulldogs aren't cheap. There are a lot of bulldog rescue places actually, because people think they're such cute puppies, but aren't prepared for the stubbornness. As long as you've done your homework, everything should be okay.
     
  8. tv910

    tv910 Well-Known Member

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    Supposedly they like the enclosed area to sleep in and it makes them feel safe but it seems to depend on the dog. Mine has a crate but he only goes into it maybe 3 or 4 times a year. When I worked at a kennel there were very few dogs who would go into a crate voluntarily, except for one especially nervous and fearful dog who clearly preferred it.
     
  9. SouthernListen

    SouthernListen I don't follow the crowd. Sorry about that. VIP

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    They usually call it crating, or crate training. I thought it was crazy when I met my wife and her dog was in a big crate, but doing some research the dogs tend to be fine with it. Her dog would go into the crate on his own for naps during the day.

    Our dogs have all free-ranged since then but recently they were causing problems, going outside at night and barking, whining to crowd into bed, scratching at the door when we locked them out of the bedroom, etc, and one was pissing on the floor in protest. We went back to crates for 3 of the 4 and reinforced it by giving them their treats at night before bedtime in the crates. Within about 3 nights they were all running outside to piss when we say "bed" , then piling back in through the dog door and jumping into the crates. Not a peep out of them. And these were dogs that for a long time had been sleeping in our bed.
     
  10. chapped

    chapped Well-Known Member

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    you dog would't happen to post in The Bar would it?
     
  11. meanredhed

    meanredhed Well-Known Member VIP Gold

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    I always crate train my dogs when they are young. I would shut the door while house breaking them, getting up every few hours to bring them outside to do their business, then putting them straight back in. It's almost like having a newborn baby again..
    When they get older I'll leave the door open and just say "time for bed" and they usually go in and sleep through the night. During the day, they nap in it too because it's their "safe place".
    Once they get older they sleep wherever they like..usually in one of my kid's bed.
     
  12. SouthernListen

    SouthernListen I don't follow the crowd. Sorry about that. VIP

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    The purchase price is just the start. Over the course of its life almost inconsequential. Not sure about Euros but in $$$ it runs about $500/year for good food and treats, $500 for routine vet care, emergency stuff/illnesses, and flea/tick/worm meds. So up to about $15,000 over its lifetime.

    Be careful with expensive and trendy breeds. Lots of bad breeders and mills out there. If there isn't a longhistory of the line available and you get to inspect the place and see the mother/father, I'd pass.
     
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  13. Anyonenow

    Anyonenow Well-Known Member

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    The obvious answer is:
    Crate the wife and let the Dog be free.
     
  14. Joe Bauers

    Joe Bauers Well-Known Member

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    My dog was crate trained. she didn't mind it. but after a few months , I just didn't see the need. she's well behaved . and besides, I don't keep my wife in a cage. why would I keep my dog in one. I love my dog way more. :dog::dogpee:
     
  15. Barton Fink

    Barton Fink Well-Known Member

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    yeah, the expense will not be an issue for us. it's more that she thinks we could get a great dog for 100 euro and be just as happy.

    I don't disagree.
     
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  16. lilbuddy67

    lilbuddy67 A man with breath-taking anger management issues Banned User

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    Fuck that Irish pig
     
  17. Barton Fink

    Barton Fink Well-Known Member

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    my wife?

    no way! she's hot. and amazing in every way.

    she does have some temper though!
     
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  18. lilbuddy67

    lilbuddy67 A man with breath-taking anger management issues Banned User

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    A hot temper that can be doused with man butter
     
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  19. Barton Fink

    Barton Fink Well-Known Member

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    so true.
     
  20. Mlaw

    Mlaw Quite Contrarian Gold

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    Think about a litter of puppies, when they sleep they cuddle up with each other. Dogs are den animals, (not in the classic sense) the confinement is comforting to them. The reason you use the kennel, is so when you train them they learn that outside is for pee and poop. They generally will not pee or poop where they sleep. If you let them sleep everywhere, then thy learn to poop and pee everywhere.
    Never put the dog in the kennel for punishment, "all I have to say is "kennel up" and Monty opens the door himself and lies down. Make sure you get a kennel that grows with the dog, they have inserts that keep it small while they are small, and then expand the size.

    http://www.petmd.com/blogs/fullyvet...arent-den-animalsso-why-do-we-crate-them-7002
     
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