Entertainment Clapton reflecting on getting old

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Shithead, Jun 11, 2016.

  1. Shithead

    Shithead Well-Known Member

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    Eric Clapton reveals incurable damage to his nervous system has left him struggling to play the guitar
    By Rehema Figueiredo Showbusiness Reporter For The Daily Mail
    Published: 18:29 EST, 10 June 2016 | Updated: 20:32 EST, 10 June 2016

    Eric Clapton has revealed he is suffering incurable damage to his nervous system which has left him struggling to play his guitar.
    The legendary rock guitarist, who has publicly fought addictions to cocaine, heroin, prescription drugs and alcohol, said that although he is grateful to be alive, he has been debilitated by his illness.
    He said: ‘I’ve had quite a lot of pain over the last year. It started with lower back pain, and turned into what they call peripheral neuropathy - which is where you feel like you have electric shocks going down your leg.
    'And I’ve had to figure out how to deal with some other things from getting old.’
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    Eric Clapton has revealed he is suffering incurable damage to his nervous system which has left him struggling to play his guitar
    Mr Clapton, 71, said that it is now ‘hard work’ to play the guitar and he has had to ‘come to terms’ with the fact that his condition will not improve.
    ‘Because I’m in recovery from alcoholism and addiction to substances, I consider it a great thing to be alive at all. By rights I should have kicked the bucket a long time ago.
    'For some reason I was plucked from the jaws of hell and given another chance,’ he said.

    He added: ‘I can still play. I mean, it’s hard work sometimes, the physical side of it - just getting old, man, is hard.’
    The veteran rock guitarist first rose to fame in the 1960s with the bands John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers, Cream and Blind Faith before launching a successful solo career in the 1970s.
    While his career boomed in the Seventies, Mr Clapton’s personal life descended into addiction and a string of doomed affairs, including with model Pattie Boyd, who was married to The Beatles guitarist George Harrison.
    He converted to Christianity but his heroin addiction became so severe that he was forced to temporarily give up performing, famously passing out while performing at a charity concert in Madison Square Garden in 1971.
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    The legendary rock guitarist (pictured left in 1989 and right in 2015) , who has publicly fought addictions to cocaine, heroin, prescription drugs and alcohol, said that although he is grateful to be alive, he has been debilitated by his illness
    Speaking to Classic Rock magazine, he said: ‘I don’t know how I survived - the Seventies especially.
    'There was one point there where they were flying me to hospital in St Paul [Minnesota] and I was dying, apparently - I had three ulcers and one of them was bleeding.
    'I was drinking three bottles of brandy and taking handfuls of codeine, and I was close to checking out. It’s amazing that I’m still here, really.’
    Mr Clapton married Miss Boyd in 1979, giving up heroin but beginning his battle with alcoholism.
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    He married Melia McEnery in 2002, 31 years his junior, a former fashion sales executive. The couple (pictured) have three daughters and a grandson together
    He described Miss Boyd in his 2007 autobiography as a ‘salve-cum-partner’ and frequently beat her and forced her to have sex with him.
    He said: ‘I kind of regret losing an awful lot of time to just being a vegetable - pickled.’
    In 1985 he had a love child with Yvonne Kelly, a manager at Associated Independent Recording, but it was not until his affair with Italian model Lory Del Santo was revealed that he divorced Pattie Boyd.
    He married Melia McEnery in 2002, 31 years his junior, a former fashion sales executive. The couple have three daughters and a grandson together.
    He said: ‘My life is really blessed. I’ve got a wonderful family, a fantastically beautiful wife, in every way, great kids, and I can still play.’
    Mr Clapton, who has performed at the Royal Albert Hall more than 200 times during his lifetime, also spoke about the struggles of getting older.
    ‘I mean, it’s hard work sometimes, the physical side of it - just getting old, man, is hard.
    'But I love to play, still. I sit in the corner of our front room with a guitar, and I play in the morning and I rest in the afternoon... Life is good,’ he said.
    The guitarist, who has just released his 23rd album, I Still Do, said the record is far from a farewell to his career but the title is a tribute to friends, family and other musicians who have passed away in recent years.
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    The veteran rock guitarist first rose to fame in the 1960s with the bands John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers, Cream (pictured) and Blind Faith before launching a successful solo career in the 1970s
     
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  2. TonyJax

    TonyJax White Privilege Denied. VIP

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    Try retiremment:dontknow:
     
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  3. Cody

    Cody Active Member

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  4. HS Cult Leader

    HS Cult Leader Elite Member Gold

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    So he's had this disease since the 70's ? Because he hasn't played anything on the guitar worth listening to since then... :fil:
     
  5. floplop

    floplop Well-Known Member

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    "Clapton WAS God"
     
  6. HS Cult Leader

    HS Cult Leader Elite Member Gold

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    Good boy....


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  7. potroast

    potroast Well-Known Member

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    Laugh all you want motherfuckers, but you will get old and it will kill you; usually slowly and painfully.

    :)
     
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  8. Skippy

    Skippy Well-Known Member

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    He should try reading this
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  9. Pigsaw

    Pigsaw Well-Known Member

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    "Ya' know what Robin? All this nonsense with Eric Clapton's pain...it's all psychosomatic. He's should read Dr. John Sarno's book! I'm tellin' ya' it's all in his head."
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    "Oh Howard, stop it."
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  10. Whipping Post

    Whipping Post VIP Extreme Gold

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  11. HS Cult Leader

    HS Cult Leader Elite Member Gold

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    3 Things to Know About Duane Allman’s ‘Layla’ Session With Eric Clapton
    Rock N' Roll Diary Extra | Matt Dolloff, 100.7 WZLX August 26, 2013 8:05 AM


    If you need convincing that Duane Allman was one of the best guitar players to ever pick up the instrument, just ask Eric Clapton. Or juuust in case you’re not good friends with Clapton like Allman was, just listen to Derek and the Dominos’ Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

    It was on August 26, 1970 that the legendary founding member of the Allman Brothers Band entered the studio to lay down guitar tracks for the album. it stands to this day as one of the most famous collaborations in rock and roll history. Here’s some interesting details to know about the session that resulted in an all-time classic record.

    1. It began with a mutual admiration between Allman and Clapton

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    By Eddie Berman (Duane Allman – Fillmore East – 6/26/71)

    Clapton was thrilled to be able to see the Allman Brothers live in Miami, the same city where the recording sessions took place, and planned on taking the opportunity to ask Allman to come to the studio and work with Derek and the Dominos. Allman was equally thrilled just to have Clapton in his presence.

    Since he’d already established himself as a transcendent guitarist in his work with the Yardbirds and Cream, Clapton left Allman in awe as he stood in the front row at the concert. It didn’t stop Allman from shredding his way through the set, though. The two eventually met after the show, expressed their admiration for each other, and agreed to work together on Layla. Allman was happy just to observe, but Clapton insisted he grab his guitar and play.

    The sessions began that very night as Duane went with Clapton & Co. to Criteria Studios in Miami, where they reportedly jammed until the next evening.

    2. Allman played Gibson guitars, while Clapton played Fender

    We all know how much Clapton loves the Fender Stratocaster, so it’s no shock whatsoever that he is the one rocking the Strat on the Layla sessions. But Allman had a varied setup as far as guitars and equipment, so it’s cool to know that he once confirmed it’s him playing all the Gibson guitars, which to trained ears have a distinctly different sound.

    Both Clapton and Allman played slide guitar on the record, so how do you tell the difference? Allman himself described it as such in a Guitar World retrospective from 1981: “The Fender is a little bit thinner and brighter, a sparkling sound, while the Gibson is just a full-tilt screech.”

    Allman mostly played his signature slide guitar on Layla, and his solo at the end of “Key to the Highway” is arguably the pinnacle of it. You could argue the same about the sounds at the end of the title track – would “Layla” be the same without Allman’s contributions?

    3. Allman’s work on Layla got Clapton into electric slide guitar

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    Clapton mainly played an acoustic guitar in the rate occasions he played with a slide, but Allman’s work with him on the Layla sessions made him want to try electric. This was mostly because of how innovative his playing was.

    “There were very few people playing electric slide that were doing anything new; it was just the Elmore James licks, and everyone knows those,” he said of Allman. “No one was opening it up until Duane showed up and played in a completely different way. That sort of made me think about taking it up.”

    Clapton called Allman “the musical brother I’d never had, but wished I did” in his autobiography. Just imagine what Allman and Clapton may have accomplished had we not lost Allman so tragically early.
     
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