Do You Have Misophonia?

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Miss America, Feb 25, 2015.

  1. Miss America

    Miss America Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    15,372
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2014
    Messages:
    729
    Likes Received:
    2,870
    Howard related because OCD is a common symptom.

    I sometimes want to split open the skulls of loud chewers.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/23/please-stop-making-that-noise/?_r=1
    I can’t stand it when someone behind me at a movie chews popcorn with his or her mouth open. I mean, I really can’t stand it.

    I have misophonia, a condition with which certain sounds can drive someone into a burst of rage or disgust. Although only identified and named in the last 20 years, misophonia has been enthusiastically embraced, with websites, Facebook pages and conferences drawing small armies of frustrated visitors.

    As a primary care physician, I find that misophonia can present some special challenges: At times, my patients can be the source of annoying sounds. At other times, the condition can be a source of special bonding if I realize that a patient is a fellow sufferer.

    But some experts question whether misophonia really exists. By naming it, are we giving too much credence to a series of symptoms that are no big deal?

    Coined by the married researchers Margaret and Pawel Jastreboff of Emory University in 2002, misophonia (“hatred of sound”) is sometimes referred to as selective sound sensitivity syndrome. Like me, those with the disorder identify a series of specific sounds that bother them. A 2013 study by Arjan Schröder and his colleagues at the University of Amsterdam identified the most common irritants as eating sounds, including lip smacking and swallowing; breathing sounds, such as nostril noises and sneezing; and hand sounds, such as typing and pen clicking.

    The range of responses to these noises is broad, from irritation to disgust to anger. Some sufferers even respond with verbal or physical aggression to those making the noises. One woman reported wanting to strangle her boyfriend in response to his chewing.

    Researchers are only beginning to understand the science behind misophonia, but early data suggest a hyperconnectivity between the auditory system and the limbic system, a part of the brain responsible for generating emotions. Some studies have found associations between misophonia and other psychiatric conditions, such as obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, but many sufferers appear to have no other major emotional problems. Dr. Schröder and other researchers are developing specific diagnostic criteria.

    Like most people with misophonia, I had symptoms long before I had heard of the condition. When I lived in New York City, I was much more sensitive than my roommates to noises from adjacent apartments. When dogs are left outside barking late at night, I fixate on the noise and cannot fall asleep. Chewing noises, particularly from behind me, are enormously irritating, as are people who perpetually sniff their mucus back into their nostrils rather than blowing their noses and ending the noise. Fortunately, I have not — at least so far — experienced nearly the rage of some of my fellow sufferers.

    For me, one of the most frustrating aspects of misophonia is what I call the “incredulity factor.” For years, I could not believe that my friends and relatives were not getting as upset at what I considered rude behaviors. They were getting frustrated with me for focusing on sounds they did not really hear.

    One of the advantages of defining misophonia is that it reminds those with the condition that only a small percentage of the population — no one knows the exact number — is affected. As one commentator wrote online, “I had to learn this is MY problem, not the problem of other people.”

    Sometimes those people are my patients. For example, I recently saw a man whose sleep is interrupted nightly by what he believes is someone moving furniture in the apartment above his. He can rarely fall asleep again, in part because of his anger. In such cases, talking to my patients about misophonia can help them understand why they are so sensitive to the offending noise. The website misophonia.com offers a sample doctor letter that patients can bring to educate their health care professionals about the condition.

    Truth be told, I also see patients who exacerbate my misophonia. Loud yawners are particular offenders. I have also seen patients whose saliva is audible every time they speak. During such encounters, I work to put aside my negative emotions and focus on the patient’s concerns, reminding myself that some of the sounds that irritate me are involuntary. I also remind myself that I am a professional whose primary responsibility is to the patient.

    Indeed, this type of behavioral conditioning is one of the recommended approaches to dealing with misophonia. Using cognitive behavioral therapy, patients may learn how to distract themselves or substitute white noise or other sounds to avoid becoming angry at others. If there is an accompanying psychiatric disease, medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may help. Removing oneself from the source of the noise can work, but is not always practical. Research into better treatments is continuing.

    So, will misophonia exist decades from now? As knowledge of the brain improves, sensitivity to sounds may be included among other psychiatric or neurological conditions. But for now, the diagnosis remains a godsend to many.

    “I can’t believe this! There are others!” one woman wrote in response to an online posting. Another commenter agreed. “I am so relieved,” she wrote, “to know I am not crazy.”
     
    TeeDonkey and ARM like this.
  2. Pooh bear

    Pooh bear Well-Known Member VIP

    Reputations:
    343,550
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Messages:
    16,542
    Likes Received:
    41,326
    I hate when people on the radio or TV whisper, the sound when people crack their knuckles and a slammed door.
    Does that fall under the term?
     
  3. Pussy Tendon

    Pussy Tendon Wet! CUNT!!!!! Gold

    Reputations:
    37,840
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    2,859
    Likes Received:
    5,230
    Hearing other people chew makes me ffffffucking nuts.
     
    mattzane227, reno, TeeDonkey and 2 others like this.
  4. MrWarmth

    MrWarmth ADORABLE DEPLORABLE Gold

    Reputations:
    174,837
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    90,469
    Likes Received:
    40,884
    I hate this old broad at work who cackles after everything she says. Just a phony humorless cackle.
    Thank you.
     
  5. Peau de Soie

    Peau de Soie Edit Button? Thanks LaserTilt!

    Reputations:
    11,162
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,617
    Likes Received:
    2,078
    Say what? :)
     
  6. Peau de Soie

    Peau de Soie Edit Button? Thanks LaserTilt!

    Reputations:
    11,162
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,617
    Likes Received:
    2,078
    Wait a minute, do we work in the same office?
     
    TeeDonkey and ARM like this.
  7. MrWarmth

    MrWarmth ADORABLE DEPLORABLE Gold

    Reputations:
    174,837
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    90,469
    Likes Received:
    40,884
    :confused:
     
  8. Tranquil

    Tranquil Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    107,050
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    9,326
    Likes Received:
    6,928
    I don't know if I have this or not, but I do know for the last 2 years this woman at work just sniffs all the time, and it drives me up the fucken wall. I bought some headphones and listen to music, and have the volume up very loud just so I don't hear her sniffing. She will from the moment she arrives at work and till the moment I leave work, just be sniffing and sniffing. I play a game with myself and when I take off my headphones, I just wait till I hear her sniff, it's usually about 2 seconds on average. What the holy fuck is wrong with her, go see a doctor, or use a fucking kleenex and blow your nose, please!
     
    Hatfield, reno, Nice and 1 other person like this.
  9. rahboni

    rahboni Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    9,850
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Messages:
    844
    Likes Received:
    1,492
    People popping/cracking gum makes me [​IMG]
     
  10. Pooh bear

    Pooh bear Well-Known Member VIP

    Reputations:
    343,550
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Messages:
    16,542
    Likes Received:
    41,326
    Is op ever gonna address the answers??
    :mad:
     
  11. ilovebacon

    ilovebacon Well-Known Member VIP

    Reputations:
    131,531
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    10,778
    Likes Received:
    15,933
    The sound of someone clipping their nails makes me mental :pissed:
     
    Gusbuss, TeeDonkey and ARM like this.
  12. tommyw1966

    tommyw1966 Member

    Reputations:
    389
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2014
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    39
    Misophonia? Is that like Misohorny? Anyway, just another freaking excuse for people to complain about something. Grow the fuck up and deal,with it. The rest of us do.
     
    Shortwave98 and Peau de Soie like this.
  13. Robert Higgins

    Robert Higgins Well-Known Member VIP

    Reputations:
    86,762
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    13,177
    Likes Received:
    20,287
    The sound of people blowing their nose like it's something to be proud of makes me want to choke them.
     
    reno, Gusbuss and Peau de Soie like this.
  14. Peau de Soie

    Peau de Soie Edit Button? Thanks LaserTilt!

    Reputations:
    11,162
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,617
    Likes Received:
    2,078
    And just remember she's sniffing all that out over the air into your nose and mouth. You're welcome.
     
  15. SomerSky

    SomerSky Obsessed with what I hate Banned User

    Reputations:
    607,492
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    9,783
    Likes Received:
    40,051
    I really fucking hate people that exclusively breathe out of their noses, even if they are snotty, and while we are at it, if I may, I hate people on the 7 train coming in from queens who smell like foreign massively garlic induced food mixed with cigarette and coffee..
    Vomitus
    Thank you

    And is this disease anything like that mesothelioma I hear so much about on every single station at home????
     
  16. Shortwave98

    Shortwave98 A-Number 1 Banned User

    Reputations:
    178,992
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2013
    Messages:
    31,231
    Likes Received:
    31,971
    Come on, really? Is this only if they're snotty?
     
    SomerSky likes this.
  17. Tranquil

    Tranquil Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    107,050
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    9,326
    Likes Received:
    6,928
    Sniffing is more of an inhale, she would have to be coughing or sneezing for that to happen, so I think I'm good.
     
  18. Tranquil

    Tranquil Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    107,050
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    9,326
    Likes Received:
    6,928
     
  19. cygnus2112

    cygnus2112 In The Prep Room

    Reputations:
    -55,893
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3,445
    Likes Received:
    4,920
    A fork scraping on someone's teeth when they put food in their mouths or when a knife scrapes on a plate when someone is cutting food makes me feel ill at times. Almost like motion sickness.
     
  20. Miss America

    Miss America Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    15,372
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2014
    Messages:
    729
    Likes Received:
    2,870
    Am I required to? I had to step out to watch my son's basketball game.
     
    Gusbuss, TeeDonkey, ARM and 1 other person like this.