News FAA vs. Drone Gun and Drone Flame Thrower Builder

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  1. wife is a whore

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    http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...methrower-drone-argues-faa-cant-regulate-him/

    By early November 2015, the Federal Aviation Administration sent the two Haughwouts an administrative subpoena seeking a substantial amount of records, including purchase records and an accounting of what monies, if any, were gained from the "Flying Gun" YouTube video.

    The elder Haughwout declined the government’s efforts, telling the FAA in an e-mail that because the agency had not alleged a particular violation, then he was under no obligation to comply. The FAA has not accused either man of a crime, but merely seeks to acquire further information about their drone-related activities.

    Within weeks, Austin Haughwout published his second video, dubbed "Roasting the Holiday Turkey." It shows a drone with a flamethrower attached, firing at a turkey roasting on a spit.

    Law & Disorder / Civilization & Discontents
    Man who built gun drone, flamethrower drone argues FAA can’t regulate him

    Austin Haughwout racked up 4+ million views on YouTube, and drew FAA's ire.
    by Cyrus Farivar - Jun 9, 2016 9:25am EDT

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    [​IMG]
    This is a still from the December 2015 flamethrower drone video.
    Hogwit
    [​IMG]
    After neighbor shot down his drone, Kentucky man files federal lawsuit
    New landmark legal case could provide guidance in ambiguous area of US law.

    The outcome of new drone lawsuit out of Connecticut turns on what seems to be a simple question: does the Federal Aviation Administration have the authority to regulate consumer drones? More specifically, can the FAA come after a student who rigged up a gun to a drone and fired it in his backyard, with no one else around?
    The FAA clearly thinks that it does and can. But some drone enthusiasts disagree, and believe that the FAA has exceeded its regulatory power—at least for now.

    On July 6, FAA lawyers will face off in a New Haven courtroom against attorneys representing a Connecticut student who produced two provocative drone-related videos, one involving a handgun mounted on a drone, and another with a flamethrower.

    [​IMG]
    Maryland “hobbyist” asks court to overturn FAA’s new drone registration rule
    "It creates a burden on hobbyists that Congress did not want to create."

    "At the time the FAA organic statute was created, drones were the stuff of science fiction," Mario Cerame, of the Randazza Legal Group, wrote in his recent opening brief defending the student, Austin Haughwout, and his father, Bret Haughwout.
    "The statute did not contemplate their existence. Rather, the statute was directed at airplanes, helicopters, and blimps, and the resources on the ground to support them."

    Haughtwout is also involved in a related lawsuit in local court trying to get him reinstated at Central Connecticut State University, which expelled him in the wake of his videos.

    Just a fun home movie
    The first of the two videos, entitled simply "Flying Gun," depicts a drone armed with some type of handgun that then fires a few shots into what appears to be a forested area over 15 seconds.

    By early November 2015, the Federal Aviation Administration sent the two Haughwouts an administrative subpoena seeking a substantial amount of records, including purchase records and an accounting of what monies, if any, were gained from the "Flying Gun" YouTube video.

    The elder Haughwout declined the government’s efforts, telling the FAA in an e-mail that because the agency had not alleged a particular violation, then he was under no obligation to comply. The FAA has not accused either man of a crime, but merely seeks to acquire further information about their drone-related activities.

    Within weeks, Austin Haughwout published his second video, dubbed "Roasting the Holiday Turkey." It shows a drone with a flamethrower attached, firing at a turkey roasting on a spit.

    At the time, the videos got a lot of attention—a combined 4 million views on YouTube—and a great deal of coverage in international media.

    The FAA again served thee Haughwouts, and the Haughwouts again did not respond. Finally, on February 11, 2016, the FAA took them to court, asking a federal judge to enforce the subpoena. Within weeks, US District Judge Jeffrey A. Meyer asked for further briefing in Huerta v. Haughwout—so the government and the Haughwouts faced off.