Happy Birthday Eric Clapton

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Shithead, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. Shithead

    Shithead Well-Known Member

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    :bday:Maybe the most overrated guitarist in history




    As Eric Clapton turns 70, it's fitting to acknowledge his achievements as a consistently high-selling guitar hero
    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Sunday, March 29, 2015, 2:00 AM
    [​IMG] ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images
    As a guitarist, Eric Clapton got the ironic nickname "Slowhand"; he's known for the sharp, ringing tone of his attack.
    Eric Clapton turns 70 on Monday, a notable achievement for anybody.

    But this birthday boy can claim a far more impressive triumph at this point in his life. After a 50-year career, Clapton stands as the most consistently huge-selling guitar hero of all time.

    No other classic rock axman has maintained such a sustained hold on the charts, having scored Top Ten albums, if not Top Five, for half a century, right up through last year’s tribute album, “The Breeze: An Appreciation of JJ Cale,” that rose to No. 2.

    [​IMG] Michael Ochs Archives
    The power trio Cream included, from left, Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce.
    Peers like Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page can’t claim anywhere near that record of commercial consistency. Neither can Pete Townshend or Keith Richards. While all remain brand names, able to fill arenas at whim, none has released new music that keeps bringing back the masses.

    Of course, Clapton’s hold on the hearts and the charts has come at a price. During many periods, he has chased trends, rather than forged them, or slid by on sentimentality, when he could have probed or challenged us.

    [​IMG]
    Eric Clapton Plans 70th Birthday With Two Madison Square Garden Gigs
    Inform

    [​IMG]
    Clapton’s albums from 1978’s “Backless” through 1983’s “Money and Cigarettes” slouched through slack riffs and snoozed through disengaged vocals. In the late ’80s, he seemed to mistake himself for Phil Collins, while his work over the last decade has found him subsuming his own character to imitate the style of his idols, B.B. King (through his terse, stinging leads) or J.J. Cale (co-opting his sleepy Tulsa funk).

    True fans have had to hold out for mere glimmers of Clapton’s genius. Luckily, even on his most dire albums, and routine concerts, they’ve found a place.

    We should take time to celebrate his unassailable peak. Between 1964 and ’74, nearly every Clapton solo and song not only electrified us, they moved the culture forward.
    While such reprieves have made the troubling arcs of Clapton’s career easier to take, as a present for his 70th B-day, we should take time to celebrate his unassailable peak. Between 1964 and ’74, nearly every Clapton solo and song not only electrified us, they moved the culture forward.

    The guitarist started to set the agenda of rock with 1964’s “Five Live Yardbirds.” His leads with that seminal Brit blues band, the Yardbirds, presaged the more elaborate electric work that would later come charging through in acts from the Peter Green-led Fleetwood Mac or Kim Simmons’ Savoy Brown.

    [​IMG] Gary Gershoff
    Derek Trucks (l.) of the Allman Brothers Band trades licks with Eric Clapton at the Beacon Theater in New York.
    Flinching from the Yardbirds’ growing pop aspirations, Clapton escaped to John Mayall’s band, which he essentially took over with 1966’s seminal “Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton.” The disc freed Clapton to hone his soon-to-be-inimitable tone and sharpen his attack. By the time the album appeared, the comet-like Clapton had left to form the game-changing band Cream with bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker, resulting in the 1966 debut, “Fresh Cream.”

    While their next album, “Disraeli Gears,” made them pop stars, live shows by the world’s first power trio (captured on albums like “Wheels of Fire”) nailed their soul. In concert, Cream blew out blues riffs with the abstraction of free jazz. In the process, they tipped off the psychedelic jam-band scene that later bloomed in San Francisco.

    [​IMG] Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
    Eric Clapton performing in the '70s.
    After less than three years with Cream, Clapton fled again, this time to the ill-conceived Blind Faith. While he attempted to make something new with Traffic’s Steve Winwood, what they ended up with sounded too much like Cream II. Yet, even their rushed, and padded, sole album housed a classic song from Clapton, “Presence of The Lord,” with a seminal wah-wah solo.

    Though Clapton was just a sideman on the “On Tour” album (cut with Delaney & Bonnie & Friends in 1970), that thrilling project pushed Clapton into a fresh, distinctly American soul sound. It’s a style he would perfect on his greatest solo work, 1970’s self-titled debut, aided by sterling contributions from Delaney Bramlett, Leon Russell and more.

    [​IMG] GAB Archive/Redferns
    Blind Faith was one of the original supergroups, and included both Clapton and Steve Winwood.
    In that same, impossibly dense year, Clapton birthed Derek & The Dominos, with Southern guitarist Duane Allman. It was one year before Allman broke big with his own band. The Dominos’ only studio album, “Layla,” features some of the most thrilling solos ever recorded, most notably on “Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?”

    Having achieved such an orgasmic peak, it was inevitable that everything thereafter would feel like a come-down. Clapton did find an adult, and poignant, new voice in the mid-’90s, with his “Tears in Heaven”/“Unplugged” juggernaut (inspired by the tragic death of his young son, Conor).

    [​IMG] CA/Redferns
    From left, Keith Relf, Chris Dreja, Paul Samwell-Smith, Jim McCarty and Eric Clapton of the Yardbirds.
    If such grown-up concerns, and performances, couldn’t hope to reach the level of innovation and inspiration of Clapton’s first decade, something indelible has endured.

    Much of it can be found in the guitarist’s rare sense of melody, as well as in his unique tone. Even on the weakest nights, he has been able to channel a clarity as individual as the greatest singers’ timbre.

    [​IMG] GAB Archive/Redferns
    Clapton electrified John Mayall's Bluesbreakers: From left, John Mayall, Eric Clapton, John McVie, Hughie Flint.
    At 70, Clapton’s sound remains instantly recognizable — a golden, shimmering sting that can cut you to the core.
     
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  2. johnfreeman1

    johnfreeman1 Well-Known Member

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    Clapton is great, Cream even better.
     
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  3. XXXXX

    XXXXX Well-Known Member

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    image.jpg image.jpg

    Here's some of Eric's (and Duane Allman's) genius.

    Layla - Vocals and Lead Guitars

     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2015
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  4. OV

    OV Rapscallion

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    Great album...and yeah, include Jimi along with Eric and Duane and you have the 3 quintessential classic rock guitar virtuosos.
     
  5. bennymuso

    bennymuso Italian by name, British by nature

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    Tears in heaven. Can't get much better.
     
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  6. mape

    mape Well-Known Member

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    A true icon. Is there anyone his age that has put out more relevant music over the entire span of their career? Class act. Growing old gracefully & with dignity. Not trying to be something he is not. The likes of him in the industry are very few. Salute!!
     
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  7. vaporizer

    vaporizer Well-Known Member

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    He's honestly not one of the most overrated guitarists in the history of guitar. I'll give that title to someone like Santana or Howard's favorite, John Mayer.

    Eric Clapton is, however, one of the LAZIEST guitarists in the history of guitar, but only starting with his descent into pop boringness in the early 70's. I defy anyone to top his tone and brilliance on the instrument between 1966 (Bluesbreakers) through 1971 (Derek and the Dominos). He had some great moments between 1989 and 1995, but then went back to being lazy after the blues tour. It's a shame really.

    I salute you as well Eric. You have been a big part of our music landscape for 50 fucking years and even though I don't love everything you've ever done, I do think you've done more than your part in shaping the way guitar is played and will be played in the future.
     
  8. Hugh Blowmont

    Hugh Blowmont Just be funny

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    Great guitarist, lousy Dad...

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. R.P. McMurphy

    R.P. McMurphy Well-Known Member

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    ...i agree that clapton is not over rated at all, hes spent a lifetime on that fret board but if you think santana is over rated ive got news for you, hes in a class by himself like wes montgomery. when you hear carlos pop a string you know its him youre listening to same as wes montgomery. i used to see santana 4 or 5 nights a week before he released his first album with the lions head on it. hes a super nice guy in person and i love to hear him play. when his super natural cd came out i wasnt able to take it out of the disk player i could listen to that cd all day long. but clapton has quite a range even tho blues is where he like to call home.
     
  10. Mulletude

    Mulletude I'm Big In The Hate Club, Ya Know VIP

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    Beware Of Mr. Baker. A great documentary about Ginger Baker, Cream's drummer and all-around wild man.
     
  11. Skippy

    Skippy Well-Known Member

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    I got tickets to the 70th birthday concert at MSG. I can't wait. I'm hoping we get some great special guests to come out and jam with Clapton.
     
  12. Turkeyneck

    Turkeyneck Howard's got one, not me VIP

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    I saw him live on his 59th b-day...hard to believe it's 11 years ago already.
     
  13. Shithead

    Shithead Well-Known Member

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    They'll all be coming out on these

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Nemo

    Nemo Beer Can Thick Gold

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    Stern show never mentions Eric as a guest.
    I guess Clapton didn't like the Stern show having a good laugh about his kid falling to his death from a high rise......replete with Fred sound drops of a fall and a splat!
     
  15. SouthernListen

    SouthernListen I don't follow the crowd. Sorry about that. VIP

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    Happy Birthday Eric!
    [​IMG]
     
  16. McLennison

    McLennison VIP Extreme Gold

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    Don't you hate when he moans about being "a pop star" and brings out his Old Blind Elmo schtick?
     
  17. knu3421

    knu3421 Well-Known Member

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    :clap: on :clap: off the clapper
     
  18. Dick Nipaolo

    Dick Nipaolo Inconsequential human

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    This shit gives me the chills. Every.... Time....
     
  19. Mack29

    Mack29 Well-Known Member

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    Hard to believe all of these rock stars from my youth are in their 60's and 70's.
    Man, I'm old.....