High School Math Teacher Goes Nuts In Class

Discussion in 'The Bar' started by dawg, Oct 10, 2010.

  1. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

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    Don’t let anyone tell you teaching is an easy job. This isn’t the first or last time, but a Tennessee high school teacher seems to have suffered a nervous breakdown in the classroom and, shouting for everyone to “shut up,†repeatedly, began to throw furniture. As a student had the tech-savvy to take out a cell-phone camera, Donald Wood’s breakdown will now probably go viral. Wood had been teaching math for seventeen years At McGavock High School in Tennessee before his outburst, which included, besides profanity and physical violence, a confession that he had started a fire inside the school. No word yet on whether Wood’s breakdown was in any way provoked or if he had a past history of mental instability. In any case, no one was harmed save Wood, who was reportedly escorted out of the premises in a fit of profane shouting. It’s like the ending of a John Hughes movie, except the teacher is not a one-dimensional antagonist but instead seems to be a human being in need of much help.




     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2014
  2. TYSON

    TYSON New Member VIP

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  3. Hit Girl

    Hit Girl Member

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    I read some of the YouTube comments and someone who'd attended classes with this teacher years ago said that he had a history of problems and was apparently taunted by students. His poor classroom management skills didn't help. I've been watching Tony Danza on A&E's "Teach" recently. It's set at Philadelphia's Northeast High. It's only the 2nd episode and he's broken down and cried several times. A good friend of mine just started his first year of teaching 11th grade chemistry in an urban Philly school. What he has to deal with daily is astonishing. One of the biggest problems, IMO are the cell phones the kids bring into class. They are constantly texting even though they face detentions if they do. When they're not texting, they're talking. He's lucky if he gets in 10-15 min of actual class time.