How Your Body Works

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by GSD, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    Discuss or post information relating to any of the body and how it functions. This could inter-relate to other threads such as Diet & Nutrition, Herbs, or Detoxification

    I can just imagine where this will go with some of you :rolleyes:

    Whenever possible please include links, articles, information, or details about them as well as your personal experiences or need for information.

    Include sources whenever possible including things such things as pictures, studies, journals, research or other medical references.







    By accessing any information in this thread or anything posted in this forum or website you agree to any Terms of Service, Privacy Policy & Disclaimer posted on this website
     
  2. SIPAWITZ

    SIPAWITZ Bialy Whore Banned User

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    my forearm hurts
     
  3. nazdrowie

    nazdrowie Sultan of Sweat Gold

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    i forgot that we had a Health forum :jj:
     
  4. mattyfishrip197

    mattyfishrip197 Well-Known Member

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    mine as well from elbow to the wrist..on top ..where the muscle and bone meet it feels like
     
  5. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    Cellular Health Research Website

    http://www.acu-cell.com/index.html

    Includes information vitamin, minerals, elements and cellular / intracellular attributes and interactions, optimal levels of intake by age and certain conditions:

    Example:

    Calcium and Magnesium

    The information presented is based on Cellular trace mineral analysis - not Serum / Blood measurements.
    RDA / DRI, synergists, antagonists, side effects, and additional deficiency / overdose / toxicity symptoms are listed on Page 2.


    Both elements share left / right-sided cell receptors and are essential to human health. Calcium (Ca) and
    Magnesium (Mg) have become the "Gold Standard" when discussing nutritional supplements, mineral ratios,
    paired cell receptors, or many nutrition-related health issues in general. [For detailed information on the
    best Calcium to Magnesium Ratio see: "Mineral Ratios for Calcium, Magnesium and other Elements"].

    Calcium is now the most promoted nutrient by proponents of conventional, nutritional, as well as alternative
    medicine - yet at the same time, the assumed need is based purely on the speculation that the body's dietary
    calcium intake is well below its requirements.

    Of the approximately 1,000 g of calcium in the average 70 kg adult body, almost 98% is found in bone, 1% in
    teeth, and the rest is found in blood, extracellular fluids, and within cells where it is a co-factor for a number
    of enzymes. Calcium promotes blood clotting by activating the protein fibrin, and along with magnesium
    helps to regulate the heart beat, muscle tone, muscle contraction and nerve conduction.

    Parathyroid hormone (PHT) secreted by the parathyroid gland and calcitonin secreted by the thyroid gland
    maintain serum calcium levels at a range of between 8.5 to 10.5, whereby calcium is mobilized from bone
    reserves, and intestinal absorption of calcium is increased as needed. The parathormone can also affect
    renal functions to retain more calcium. When blood calcium does up from too much parathyroid activity,
    calcitonin reduces availability of calcium from bone.

    The calcium to phosphorus ratio in bone is about 2.5 :1, while the ideal dietary phosphorus / calcium ratio
    is estimated to be about 1 :1. Many dietary factors reduce calcium uptake, such as foods high in oxalic acid
    (spinach, rhubarb, beets, chocolate), which can interfere with calcium absorption by forming insoluble salts in
    the gut. Phytic acid, or phytates found in whole grain products, fiber-rich foods, excess caffeine from coffee,
    colas, tea..., as well as certain medications may all reduce the absorption of calcium and other minerals, or
    leach calcium from bone. Normal intake of protein, fats, and acidic foods help calcium absorption, however
    high levels of these same sources increase calcium loss.

    Chronic calcium deficiency is associated with some forms of hypertension, prostate and colorectal cancer,
    some types of kidney stones, miscarriage, birth (heart) defects in children when the mother is deficient in
    calcium during pregnancy, menstrual and premenstrual problems, various bone, joint and periodontal diseases,
    sleep disturbances, mental health / depressive disorders, cardiovascular and/or hemorrhagic diseases, and
    others (listed on Page 2).

    Elevated calcium levels are associated with arthritic / joint and vascular degeneration, calcification of
    soft tissue, hypertension and stroke, an increase in VLDL triglycerides, gastrointestinal disturbances, mood
    and depressive disorders, chronic fatigue, increased alkalinity, and general mineral imbalances. High calcium
    levels interfere with Vitamin D and subsequently inhibit the vitamin's cancer-protective effect unless extra
    amounts of Vitamin D are supplemented.

    For best absorption, calcium supplements should be taken with food, and doses should not exceed 500 mg at a time.
    ____________________________________________________________________
    Cellular / Intracellular Attributes and Interactions:

    Calcium Synergists:
    Copper, potassium, boron, strontium, sodium, CoQ10
    titanium, Vitamin B5, Vitamin K, [Magnesium, Vit D].

    Calcium Antagonists / Inhibitors: *
    Phosphorus, iron, manganese, germanium, chloride,
    bismuth, chromium, zinc, sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin C,
    niacin / niacinamide, PABA, [magnesium, Vitamin D],
    protein, phytic acid, oxalic acid, lecithin, mineral oil,
    alcohol, insoluble fiber, caffeine.

    Magnesium Synergists:
    Chromium, zinc, boron, CoQ10, Vitamin B2,
    Vitamin B6, [calcium, Vit D], insoluble fiber.

    Magnesium Antagonists / Inhibitors:
    Sodium, potassium, iron, selenium, copper, lithium,
    silicon / silica, manganese, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1,
    Vitamin E, niacin / niacinamide, PABA, Vitamin K,
    folate, choline, uric acid, alcohol, [calcium, Vit D].
    * Most of the above are dose-dependent. They are co-factors at normal levels, and antagonists at higher levels.

    Low Levels / Deficiency - Symptoms and/or Risk Factors:

    Calcium:
    Insomnia, anxiety, nervousness, depression, fatigue,
    muscle / joint pains, muscle spasms / cramps, high
    stomach acid, osteoporosis, seizures, birth defects,
    miscarriage, high blood pressure, irregular heart
    beat, cardiovascular disease, hemorrhagic stroke,
    aneurysms, PMS, dysmenorrhea (painful periods),
    rickets, higher risk for some cancers.

    Magnesium:
    Irregular heart beat, cardiovascular disease, anxiety,
    insomnia, nervousness, fatigue, muscle / joint pains,
    osteoporosis, seizures, high stomach acid, asthma,
    high blood pressure, PMS, depression, sweating,
    muscle spasms / cramps, dysmenorrhea, angina,
    constipation, migraine / headaches.
    High levels / Overdose / Toxicity / Negative Side Effects - Symptoms and/or Risk Factors:

    Calcium:
    Arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, arrhythmia,
    ischemic heart disease and stroke, hypertension,
    low stomach acid, depression, fatigue, glaucoma,
    higher risk for several cancers, muscle / joint pains,
    osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, calcification, dry skin,
    constipation.

    Calcium Sources:
    Dairy products, tofu, almonds, brazil nuts, salmon,
    sardines, broccoli, collard greens, kale, cauliflower,
    soybeans, seaweed / kelp, hard water, molasses.
    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    Magnesium:
    Cardiovascular disease, arrhythmia, cardiac arrest,
    coma, muscle spasms, joint / spinal degeneration,
    bone loss, low stomach acid, low body temperature,
    low blood pressure, higher risk for several cancers,
    intestinal / genitourinary bleeding, dry skin, fatigue,
    depression, dehydration, diarrhea.

    Magnesium Sources:
    Almonds, brazil nuts, soybeans, wheat germ, seeds,
    wheat bran, millet, legumes, dark green vegetables,
    fruit, seafood, hard water.
     
  6. SIPAWITZ

    SIPAWITZ Bialy Whore Banned User

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    So if I drink more milk it will stop hurting
     
  7. Mr. Potato Head

    Mr. Potato Head ~Would Like to Play~ Gold

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  8. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    Stop masturbating and find a woman that should fix it

    :facepalm: MOD:nazdrowie FORUM: Dawg Saloon AUTHORITIE: Revoked

    See above

    Try breast milk

    :jj:
     
  9. mattyfishrip197

    mattyfishrip197 Well-Known Member

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    i also had bad muscle cramps in me legs this summer....i bought some bananas..muscle cramp pills and roll on and some gatorade was good in a couple days
     
  10. Partyxanimal

    Partyxanimal Well-Known Member

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    Cramps are related to lack of potassium I've heard :dontknow:
     
  11. walleye

    walleye Active Member Banned User

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    Around lunchtime my right shoulder aches. Like a headache. I have broken it 2 times. Could it be the rotator cuff?
     
  12. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    You're probably hemorrhaging if you're not dead by the time I post this you will be shortly
     
  13. walleye

    walleye Active Member Banned User

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    Damn, I have had it for about 2 years. Better get my affairs together.
     
  14. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    2 years and you haven't gone to a doctor yet?
     
  15. walleye

    walleye Active Member Banned User

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    Oh yes, been to the Dr, I average 2 ER visits a month. It's just that the pain I am having takes my mind off the shoulder. I have to get some stiches removed this week, I'll bring it up.
     
  16. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    Hmm broken 2 times does it ache in or right around the shoulderjoint?

    I've got an old sports injury like that

    Could be arthuritus

    [​IMG]
     
  17. walleye

    walleye Active Member Banned User

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  18. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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  19. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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    Importance of proper digestion. Some food allergies can be caused by the lack of appropriate enzymes in the body to digest the food. In turn your body begins to treat the undigested food as it would an infection in the body. Reactions can range from allergies all the way to more serious problems such as different types of inflammatory bowel diseases (Chrohn's, IBS, Colitis Ulcerative Colitis etc)

    http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/new/dienzyme.htm

    + more links to follow
     
  20. GSD

    GSD Active Member

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