King Richard III found under a parking lot.

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by LaserT, May 28, 2015.

  1. LaserT

    LaserT You have to have fun. Gold

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    LONDON — Scientists say there is “overwhelming evidence” that a skeleton found under a parking lot is that of England’s King Richard III, but their DNA testing also has raised questions about the nobility of some of his royal successors.

    The bones of the 15th-century king were dug up in the city of Leicester in 2012, and experts have published initial data suggesting they belong to Richard, including an analysis of his curved spine and the injuries that killed him.

    Richard was the last English monarch to die on a battlefield, in 1485.“The wounds to the skull suggest that he was not wearing a helmet, and the absence of defensive wounds on his arms and hands indicate that he was otherwise still armored at the time of his death.”
    “I think the most surprising injury is the one to the pelvis,” Hainsworth said. “We believe that this corresponds to contemporary accounts of Richard III being slung over the back of the horse to be taken back to Leicester after the Battle of Bosworth, as this would give someone the correct body position to inflict this injury.”There were nine injuries to the skull in total and two elsewhere on the skeleton.




    In the new study — probably the oldest forensic case ever solved — scientists compared DNA from the skeleton to living relatives and analyzed DNA data identifying eye and hair color, which they matched to the earliest known portrait of the king.“The probability that this is Richard is 99.999 percent,” said Turi King, a geneticist at the University of Leicester who led the research.





    Richard's Council of the North, described as his 'one major institutional innovation,' derived from his ducal council following his own viceregal appointment by Edward IV; when Richard himself became king, he maintained the same conciliar structure in his absence.[170] It officially became part of the royal council machinery under the presidency of John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln in April 1484, based at Sandal Castle in Wakefield.[95] It is considered to have greatly improved conditions for northern England, as it was, in theory at least, intended to keep the peace and punish law breakers, as well as resolving land disputes.[96] Bringing regional governance directly under the control of central government, it has been described as the king's 'most enduring monument,' surviving unchanged until 1641.[96]

    In December 1483, Richard instituted what later became known as the Court of Requests, a court to which poor people who could not afford legal representation could apply for their grievances to be heard.[171] He also improved bail in January 1484, to protect suspected felons from imprisonment before trial and to protect their property from seizure during that time.[172] He founded the College of Arms in 1484,[173] he banned restrictions on the printing and sale of books,[174] and he ordered the translation of the written Laws and Statutes from the traditional French into English.

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    Forensic remake of his face from his skeleton..

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    Last edited: May 29, 2015
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  2. DinnerSocks

    DinnerSocks Well-Known Member

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    ...my whole kingdom for a horse!
     
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  3. deevee

    deevee Active Member

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    Story is from Sept 2012. Hey did ya hear Artie left the Stern show?
     
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  4. LaserT

    LaserT You have to have fun. Gold

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    Guessing you're an original poster back from the dead haha. Yeah it's a 2012 article in my post. A lot of my stories are older. I post em when I find them. ;)

    Artie left the show. :eek:
     
  5. SouthernListen

    SouthernListen I don't follow the crowd. Sorry about that. VIP

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    Hate to break this to the "experts" but one could have had their head bashed in wearing a helmet. They were relatively light. The really heavy ones you see were for jousting. The helmet would also tend to fall or be taken off if one was felled by something else. The skull crush could have been a coup de grace.

    Defensive wounds on the arms and hands certainly would not prove anything. If someone skewers you or bashes you in the head, you probably won't have wounds on your hands and arms.

    He was said to be killed with a halbard during a charge into the Tudor lines to try and kill Henry. A Halbard looks like this and could be imagined to stave in a helmet if connecting on a swing, or stab someone and leave no defensive wounds, so I'm not sure what proof those two things would be. The spine and any fragments of clothing would be more useful. The little spike on the back would be for punching through armor.
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    This is a quote from an account of the battle and Richard's death.

    "It was said that the blows were so violent that the king's helmet was driven into his skull."


    Sorry to hijack the interesting account, but many "scholars" today aren't worth a shit.
     
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  6. LaserT

    LaserT You have to have fun. Gold

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    In the article I saw, they said he was not wearing a helmet though...but who knows.

    You can hijack anytime SL. You know your stuff.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2015
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  7. ilovebacon

    ilovebacon Well-Known Member VIP

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    I watched his official church burial a few months ago. They had Benedict Cumberbatch do a reading at the service because he played Richard on stage once. :dontknow:
     
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  8. ApeFace

    ApeFace Well-Known Member

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    The King probably thought he was something special during his time on Earth. He still wound up buried under a parking lot with bums pissing on his grave. Oh well. Ashes to ashes.
     
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  9. reno

    reno VIP Extreme Gold

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    I heard the parking lot was full and he's still looking for a spot to park his horse.
     
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  10. Gretsch Man

    Gretsch Man Well-Known Member

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    I'll take the word of the experts.
     
  11. skunk anansie

    skunk anansie Well-Known Member VIP

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    How did he wind up under a parking lot?
     
  12. Dlist

    Dlist Well-Known Member VIP

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  13. HowieStearn

    HowieStearn HateClub

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    thats dignified alright
     
  14. hugh jasol

    hugh jasol white trash on dope Gold

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    Damn, look at that spine!
     
  15. joyceface

    joyceface Queen of Everything VIP

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    Jesus Christ on so many levels!
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  16. XXXXX

    XXXXX Well-Known Member

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    http://kriii.com

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    Home » About The Centre » An incredible discovery
    An incredible discovery
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    In August 1485 King Richard III was killed at the Battle of Bosworth, and buried by the Grey Friars, a Franciscan Holy order, in their friary church.

    In August 2012, Leicester City Council, the University of Leicester, and the Richard III Society began a search underneath a car park in Leicester, to find King Richard III’s remains and the Grey Friars Church.

    This coincided with the 527th anniversary of the date King Richard III was killed at the Battle of Bosworth. Five months after the dig began, the University of Leicester confirmed a skeleton unearthed by archaeologists was in fact Richard III.

    Although the well-known local story was that King Richard’s bones were thrown into the river by a mob at the time of the Reformation, in recent times, a number of researchers began to put the case for the remains still being buried in the Greyfriars area of Leicester, including David Baldwin, a University of Leicester tutor. In the years following this theory was advanced by historian John Ashdown-Hill, who together with researcher Philippa Langley, proposed a more precise location for his whereabouts: the north end of a city council car park at Greyfriars, the offices of its Social Services department.

    Fast forward to Spring 2011 and Philippa Langley, of the Richard III Society, approached Leicester City Council and the University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) in the hope that they would carry out an excavation of the Greyfriars Social Services car park site. Everyone was enthusiastic. Although the chance of finding Richard III were minute, ULAS were keen to find the old Greyfriars Church. With the help of University funding and an International Appeal by the Richard III Society that saved the search for the king, the dig eventually got the go ahead in summer 2012.

    In August 2012, the careful process of excavation began. In the days that followed the archaeologists uncovered not only the old Greyfriars church, but a skeleton with battle wounds and a curved spine.

    The skeleton was exhumed and the process of formal identification began. Experts from the University of Leicester used DNA sampling to link the skeleton to Richard III’s descendants. Carbon dating of the bones dated them to 1455-1540, which coincides with Richard III’s death. Furthermore the bones were identified to be of a man between late 20s or early 30s and Richard III died aged 32.

    After careful scientific examination, the University announced in February 2013 that the skeleton found was indeed Richard III.

    Examining the skeleton gave the University a new insight into the life and death of Richard III, for instance, he was portrayed by some Tudor historians, with a political “axe to grind”, as being “deformed”; although the curved spine on the skeleton does show he had Scoliosis, he did not have a withered arm or other details attributed to him in some characterisations.

    King Richard III will be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral, which is located just 100 steps away from the visitor centre, in March 2015.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2015
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