News Longtime Immigration Lawyer And Pastor Explains the Refugee Process

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by señor pedro, Nov 21, 2015.

  1. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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    Aqui tienen, esto es para que aprendan algo en vez de sentirse satisfecho con la mierda que sale de la boca de Trump. :ears:




    Most of my friends know I practice Immigration law. As such, I have worked with the refugee community for over two decades. This post is long, but if you want actual information about the process, keep reading.

    I can not tell you how frustrating it is to see the misinformation and outright lies that are being perpetuated about the refugee process and the Syrian refugees. So, here is a bit of information from the real world of someone who actually works and deals with this issue.

    The refugee screening process is multi-layered and is very difficult to get through. Most people languish in temporary camps for months to years while their story is evaluated and checked.

    First, you do not get to choose what country you might be resettled into. If you already have family (legal) in a country, that makes it more likely that you will go there to be with family, but other than that it is random. So, you can not simply walk into a refugee camp, show a document, and say, I want to go to America. Instead, the UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees) works with the local authorities to try to take care of basic needs. Once the person/family is registered to receive basic necessities, they can be processed for resettlement. Many people are not interested in resettlement as they hope to return to their country and are hoping that the turmoil they fled will be resolved soon. In fact, most refugees in refugee events never resettle to a third country. Those that do want to resettle have to go through an extensive process.

    Resettlement in the U.S. is a long process and takes many steps. The Refugee Admissions Program is jointly administered by the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) in the Department of State, the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and offices within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) within DHS conducts refugee interviews and determines individual eligibility for refugee status in the United States.

    We evaluate refugees on a tiered system with three levels of priority.

    First Priority are people who have suffered compelling persecution or for whom no other durable solution exists. These individuals are referred to the United States by UNHCR, or they are identified by the U.S. embassy or a non-governmental organization (NGO).

    Second priority are groups of “special concern” to the United States. The Department of State determines these groups, with input from USCIS, UNHCR, and designated NGOs. At present, we prioritize certain persons from the former Soviet Union, Cuba, Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, Iran, Burma, and Bhutan.

    Third priority are relatives of refugees (parents, spouses, and unmarried children under 21) who are already settled in the United States may be admitted as refugees. The U.S.-based relative must file an Affidavit of Relationship (AOR) and must be processed by DHS.

    Before being allowed to come to the United States, each refugee must undergo an extensive interviewing, screening, and security clearance process conducted by Regional Refugee Coordinators and overseas Resettlement Support Centers (RSCs). Individuals generally must not already be firmly resettled (a legal term of art that would be a separate article). Just because one falls into the three priorities above does not guarantee admission to the United States.

    The Immigration laws require that the individuals prove that they have a “well-founded fear,” (another legal term which would be a book.) This fear must be proved regardless of the person’s country, circumstance, or classification in a priority category. There are multiple interviews and people are challenged on discrepancies. I had a client who was not telling the truth on her age and the agency challenged her on it. Refugees are not simply admitted because they have a well founded fear. They still must show that they are not subject to exclusion under Section 212(a) of the INA. These grounds include serious health matters, moral or criminal matters, as well as security issues. In addition, they can be excluded for such things as polygamy, misrepresentation of facts on visa applications, smuggling, or previous deportations. Under some circumstances, the person may be eligible to have the ground waived.

    At this point, a refugee can be conditionally accepted for resettlement. Then, the RSC sends a request for assurance of placement to the United States, and the Refugee Processing Center (RPC) works with private voluntary agencies (VOLAG) to determine where the refugee will live. If the refugee does have family in the U.S., efforts will be made to resettle close to that family.

    Every person accepted as a refugee for planned admission to the United States is conditional upon passing a medical examination and passing all security checks. Frankly, there is more screening of refugees than ever happens to get on an airplane. Of course, yes, no system can be 100% foolproof. But if that is your standard, then you better shut down the entire airline industry, close the borders, and stop all international commerce and shipping. Every one of those has been the source of entry of people and are much easier ways to gain access to the U.S. Only upon passing all of these checks (which involve basically every agency of the government involved in terrorist identification) can the person actually be approved to travel.

    Before departing, refugees sign a promissory note to repay the United States for their travel costs. This travel loan is an interest-free loan that refugees begin to pay back six months after arriving in the country.

    Once the VOLAG is notified of the travel plans, it must arrange for the reception of refugees at the airport and transportation to their housing at their final destination.
    This process from start to finish averages 18 to 24 months, but I have seen it take years.

    The reality is that about half of the refugees are children, another quarter are elderly. Almost all of the adults are either moms or couples coming with children. Each year the President, in consultation with Congress, determines the numerical ceiling for refugee admissions. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, the proposed ceiling is 85,000. We have been averaging about 70,000 a year for the last number of years. (Source: Refugee Processing Center)

    Over one-third of all refugee arrivals (35.1 percent, or 24,579) in FY 2015 came from the Near East/South Asia—a region that includes Iraq, Iran, Bhutan, and Afghanistan.
    Another third of all refugee arrivals (32.1 percent, or 22,472) in FY 2015 came from Africa.
    Over a quarter of all refugee arrivals (26.4 percent, or 18,469) in FY 2015 came from East Asia — a region that includes China, Vietnam, and Indonesia. (Source: Refugee Processing Center)

    Finally, the process in Europe is different. I would be much more concerned that terrorists are infiltrating the European system because they are not nearly so extensive and thorough in their process.
     
  2. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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    Hey you Dominican faggot,

    any stories on how your country is kicking out Haitians? :mrpeanut:
     
  3. Lemmy

    Lemmy Douchebag Extraordinaire Gold

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  4. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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    CrucifiedAGT likes this.
  5. Divorce Chicken

    Divorce Chicken white punk on dope VIP

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    We're $20 trillion dollars in debt. Thanks to Obongo's shit-stirring, minorities are ready to riot. 93 million Americans have dropped out of the labor force.

    We're not really in a position to take on anymore problems, let alone possible terrorists.
     
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  6. RonHeinzkaboot

    RonHeinzkaboot Adultophile VIP

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    the real problem with Syrians is not the refugee program
    it's the travel visas and student visas between US and France, Turkey, Belgium, etc.
    if they are from a France they don't even need a visa they can just come over with a passport

    or they can just pretend to be Cuban and come in thru Mexico, instead green card
     
  7. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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    :spanking: :happy:
    How does the refugee vetting process work?


    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/how-does-the-refugee-vetting-process-work/


    WASHINGTON — Hundreds of thousands of Syrians have fled that country to escape the ongoing civil war there. Migrants have trekked across Turkey, landing first in Greece, before making their way into Europe. European authorities have been overwhelmed by the mass migration. Meanwhile, the United States has announced plans to accept about 10,000 Syrian refugees trying to leave the region...

    Here are a few things to know:

    — The U.S. annually accepts 70,000 refugees from around the world. This group includes people fleeing violence, religious persecution and war. The Obama administration announced earlier this year that the number of people invited to move to the U.S. as refugees would be increased to 85,000 in the coming year, including about 10,000 Syrians.

    — The U.S. has helped resettle about 2,500 Syrian refugees since the war started in that country in 2011. The Obama administration said about half that group is children, while about 2.5 percent are people over the age of 60 and roughly 2 percent are single men of combat age. The overall group is almost evenly split among men and women.


    — Amid questions about background checks and security vetting, the administration for the first time this week disclosed new details about how refugees are investigated. The process is directed by the Homeland Security Department and involves the State Department and U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies. Refugees submit to in-person interviews overseas, where they provide biographical details about themselves, including their families, friendships, social or political activities, employment, phone numbers, email accounts and more. They also provide biometric information about themselves, including fingerprints. Syrians are subject to additional, classified controls, according to administration officials, who briefed reporters this week on condition that they not be identified by name to publicly discuss confidential details about the process. The Associated Press had been seeking details about the vetting process since September.

    — Administration officials have acknowledged that checking the accuracy or authenticity of documents provided by refugee applicants against foreign government records can be especially difficult involving countries that don’t cooperate with the U.S. government, such as Syria. It can also complicate U.S. efforts to check foreign government records for local arrests or lesser bureaucratic interactions, such as bank records, business licenses or civil filings. “We do the best we can with the information we have,” one U.S. official said.

    — As for concerns about potential refugees lacking documents to prove who they are, the administration officials said Syrians as a population tend to provide extensive documents involving their day-to-day lives. They often arrive with family histories, military records and other information that can be useful for American authorities investigating them.

    — Refugees who spent years waiting for approval to come to the United States said authorities asked detailed questions repeatedly in multiple interviews, including pressing them about their backgrounds and reasons for fleeing Syria. Nedal Al-Hayk, who was resettled in suburban Detroit with his family after a three-year wait, said officials interviewed him and his wife in separate rooms, asking repeatedly and in different ways where they were born, where their parents were born, what they did before and during the war or whether they were armed, part of a rebel group, supportive of the government or even politically outspoken.

    — Syrians initially file refugee claims with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, which then refers them to the U.S. government. The process has no guarantee of approval and takes so long — Syrians wait nearly three years for approval to come to the U.S. — that experts said it would be a longshot for an extremist group to rely on the refugee program as a way to sneak someone into the United States. The Islamic State group has had far more success appealing to people already living inside the United States to commit or conspire to commit violence. Attorney General Loretta Lynch told lawmakers this week that roughly 70 people have been charged with crimes related to foreign-fighter activity and homegrown violent extremism since 2013.

    — House Republicans are proposing changes to the refugee vetting process that would include more background checks from the FBI. The proposed legislation, which could be voted on as early as Thursday, would halt refugee processing while the new protocol is established. The bill would require that the heads of the FBI, Homeland Security Department and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence certify that each refugee being admitted would not pose a threat. It could have the practical effect of keeping refugees out of the United States entirely.

    The White House on Wednesday threated to veto any legislation to toughen the screening process for Syrian refugees.

    Associated Press reporter Alicia A. Caldwell write this report.

    AP reporters Sophia Tareen in Chicago, Jeff Karoub in Detroit, and Bradley Klapper and Erica Werner in Washington contributed to this report.
     
  8. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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  9. Slow

    Slow All The Pieces Matter DawgShed News

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    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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    Then replace your AV with an American flag and "Dawg's" over SFN, you fat faggot.
     
  11. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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    Esa es una legitima y real preocupacion mi amigo. En cambio a las estupideces que piensan las ovejas siguiendo a Trump. :up:
     
  12. MrAdamapple

    MrAdamapple Shit Mult Banned User

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    You forgot to add that there's also 128 trillion Dollars of unfunded liabilities. Debt is nothing compared to that. We pay 70 percent of our GDP to service the debt and entitlements. There won't be any room for spending to stimulate growth when the next recession hits. Food Stamp and welfare will be cut. The black lives matter crowd is gonna be pissed. But we will have more diversity because diversity is our strength . Yaay.
     
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  13. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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    Yo no entiendo porque? :dontknow:
     
  14. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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    Why does the Dominican Republic get rid of people that look Haitian?

    Do you agree with this policy?
     
  15. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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    No.
     
  16. Mlaw

    Mlaw Quite Contrarian Gold

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    20 million pr year --20 million per year
     
  17. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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    Because if it's one thing Haitians bring, it's prosperity.
     
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  18. Divorce Chicken

    Divorce Chicken white punk on dope VIP

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    Not to mention how horribly we treat our veterans. In many ways we're a broken nation and need time to take care of ourselves. If not for us, for our children.
     
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  19. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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    Tu logica esta... :unuts:
     
  20. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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    My logic is that demographics is destiny.

    If you import a bunch of Germans or Swedes, a country will look like Sweden of Germany.

    If you import a bunch muslims, your country will look like Saudi Arabia.

    If you import a bunch of fat lazy white people that speak spanish, your country will be Argentina.