News Oklahoma Cops Find A New Way To Take People’s Money, Even If They Don’t Have Cash

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by XXXXX, Jun 9, 2016.

  1. XXXXX

    XXXXX Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    63,927
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2014
    Messages:
    3,860
    Likes Received:
    11,316
    Oklahoma Cops Find A New Way To Take People’s Money, Even If They Don’t Have Cash
    A device that can access funds linked to prepaid debit cards is sparking new concerns about civil asset forfeiture.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/oklahoma-police-erad_us_57584060e4b0e39a28ac2083


    Isn't this a clear violation of the 4th Amendment?


    Oklahoma police agencies are being equipped with devices that allow officers to scan prepaid debit cards and target funds linked to them for civil asset forfeiture, which allows law enforcers to permanently seize property they suspect is connected to criminal activity.

    The Oklahoma Department of Public Safety has purchased Electronic Recovery and Access to Data machines for installation in Oklahoma Highway Patrol and Oklahoma City police cruisers, according to an Oklahoma Watch report published Tuesday. The device tells officers the balance of prepaid debit cards and gift cards, and allows them to seize the money if they determine it’s suspicious. ERAD readers also can provide limited information about pretty much any card with a magnetic strip, including bank debit cards and credit cards.

    Oklahoma has become a battleground in the debate over civil asset forfeiture reform in recent years, prompted by high-profile cases of cops using the practice to take cash and property from innocent people — often without charging them with a crime. Thanks to the new ERAD readers, police can now access people’s electronic funds as well.

    Each ERAD reader is costing the state about $5,000, plus about $1,500 for training. The state has agreed to pay the manufacturer, ERAD Group, 7.7 percent of all funds forfeited with the readers.


    To avoid losing the money permanently, the owner would have to fight an expensive and time-consuming legal battle to prove the property wasn’t connected to criminal activity.

    In civil forfeiture proceedings, the legal principle of “innocent until proven guilty” is effectively inverted.

     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
    FrstTimeLngTme likes this.
  2. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    541,153
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,559
    Likes Received:
    90,938
    Here is a preview of America in just a few short years.

    hqdefault.jpg
     
    FrstTimeLngTme and reno like this.
  3. reno

    reno VIP Extreme Gold

    Reputations:
    323,698
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    13,705
    Likes Received:
    40,549
    1984 wasn't supposed to be an instructual manual.
     
  4. FrstTimeLngTme

    FrstTimeLngTme Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    17,338
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,266
    Likes Received:
    3,588
    Another day another scam against the people.
     
  5. ScottBaiosPenis

    ScottBaiosPenis Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    77,389
    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    8,971
    Likes Received:
    15,454
    My guess drug dealers getting smart ,avoids irs reporting law and you can carry hundreds of thousands in your pocket vs a brief case.
     
  6. yaddc

    yaddc Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    104,133
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2014
    Messages:
    23,192
    Likes Received:
    20,739
    There like the Canadian police they always get there man in this case money.