Quivers: A Life -- 20 Years Later

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Benjamen, Mar 1, 2015.

  1. Benjamen

    Benjamen Well-Known Member

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    This week I read Quivers: A Life for my first time, 20 years after its 1995 release. Although I’m no Robin fan, I tried to remain as open-minded as possible when reading this autobiography. However, I found it impossible to overlook the record-holding score she received in 2009, when she took Dr. Drew’s narcissism test. (She got a 34 out of 40; the average American scores a 15.) I therefore had reservations about a lot of this book, considering the traits that define narcissistic personality disorder:

    • Having an exaggerated sense of self-importance
    • Expecting to be recognized as superior even without achievements that warrant it
    • Exaggerating your achievements and talents
    • Being preoccupied with fantasies about success, power, brilliance, beauty or the perfect mate
    • Believing that you are superior and can only be understood by or associate with equally special people
    • Requiring constant admiration
    • Having a sense of entitlement
    • Expecting special favors and unquestioning compliance with your expectations
    • Taking advantage of others to get what you want
    • Having an inability or unwillingness to recognize the needs and feelings of others
    • Being envious of others and believing others envy you
    • Behaving in an arrogant or haughty manner

    [​IMG]


    Throughout the book, Robin compares her life’s challenges to the rising and falling career of her hero, Muhammad Ali, and she describes events in her own life in boxing terms (“It would prove to be the most crucial decision of my life, for the opponents to come were more formidable than I could ever have imagined;” “Funny how Muhammad was attempting to end his boxing career just as I was headed back into the ring;" "I didn’t know it, but I was rushing headlong into the fight of my life.”).

    Robin made a ludicrous entrance to the party promoting her autobiography’s 1995 release. Inspired by a line in her book ("I feel like I've been a fighter all my life"), Robin, in a silk boxing robe and carrying oversize gold boxing gloves, inched down Fifth Avenue on a flatbed truck, flanked by male and female boxers, blaring the theme from “Rocky.” The New York Times wrote: “Many pedestrians looked more bemused than amused at the strange procession, perhaps because they didn't know who Ms. Quivers was or why she was behaving like she was worth a parade. Ms. Quivers even looked a little embarrassed herself. ‘Can you get me out of this?’ she said to one familiar face as she smiled and waved."

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The over-the-top spectacle and gimmickry are at odds with the somber, accusatory, utterly humorless tone of the book, which reminds readers every few pages that Robin was molested by her father as an 11-year-old, and mentally abused by her mother (she calls them cannibals who ate their own young).

    That’s why Howard and Jackie were nearly speechless when, on her birthday, three years after the book’s release, Robin brought her parents, brother and nephew Anthony (the one she recently smoked pot with in Amsterdam) into the studio, after having her limo driver pick them up and present her mother with roses -- and before taking them to her high-rise condo, and then to watch her ride her horse in Central Park. It was as if she’d never said a bad word about them, and hadn't been estranged from them for half of her adult life (including the first five years of Anthony’s life).



    “I don’t think we should bring up anything to your father, though,” Howard says, referring to the book’s molestation charges.

    “My father wouldn’t know what you were talking about,” Robin replies. “My father suffers from Alzheimer’s.”

    It’s worth noting that Robin didn’t go public with her story about sexual molestation until this book, when her father already had Alzheimer’s. In fact, she never spoke to anyone about it until she was in her 20s, and became a “workshop junkie” at a New Age organization (“designed to produce the enlightenment of the East by using Western techniques”) in San Francisco. The mission of the first weekend-long workshop she attended was to “unearth the secret traumas of growing up female.” All weekend Robin listened silently as others told tales of abuse at the hands of fathers, brothers, friends and strangers. Weeks later, after attending a workshop on parents, Robin – seemingly the only attendee with no story of her own so far – finally spoke up about her own abuse. (She was congratulated for being “one hell of a strong bitch.”)

    In the epilogue of the book, Robin sits down to interview her father on camera. By then the Alzheimer’s is already attacking his brain, and he doesn’t even recognize himself on TV when Robin plays the tape back for him. (“Who is that talking about me?” her father asks, confused. “Well, he certainly is telling the truth,” he adds. “That’s exactly how it happened.”) She asks him for great details about his youth, his first marriage and his time in the war, but does not ask the frail old man to acknowledge the molestation charges.

    Earlier in the book, she includes her recount of a phone conversation with her father from a few years prior, where, after years of estrangement from her parents, Robin demands an apology. “I wrote you that letter that time,” her father replies. “I never read it,” Robin answers. (In fact, she shredded it upon receipt, without even opening the envelope, so there’s no record of what he said in the letter.) “Oh, okay. Well, I’m really sorry for what I did to you. I had no idea what affect it would have or that it would bother you for the rest of your life. I didn’t know what I was doing, and it was wrong.” However, we don’t know for certain that he and Robin are talking about the same thing, because neither of them defined what it was exactly that they were discussing. And by this point, as Robin proudly points out time and time again, her 7th grade-educated parents were utterly terrified of her, but desperate to have her back in their lives.

    Robin claims that the inappropriate hugging, kissing, fondling and one-time vaginal insertion with a finger occurred during a brief period when she was 11. Her mother, a long-time foster parent (to real humans, not kittens), was unaware of any molestation in her house until Robin told her about it as an adult. When Robin, as an adult, informed her brother about the molestation, he promptly ended the call with the word “Okay” -- and a dial tone. (He had called Robin to tell her that their father was about to have surgery for a recent heart attack. Robin’s response: “What do you want me to do, come home and kill your father?” As I said, the family was terrified of Robin at this point, and knew better than to challenge her on anything. Read more about her self-admitted tyranny in the TREATING OTHERS LIKE SHIT category below.)

    Because of all this uncertainty, because Robin confesses in the book that she has knowingly lied on record about Howard [see the LIES category below] when she wanted to hurt him, and because of this --


    Robin's Nephew Anthony Comes In. 08/12/04. 10:10am

    Robin's nephew Anthony was there at the station … Howard told him that he should read his aunt's book (Quivers: A Life). Robin told him that it was all made up and he doesn't need to read it.


    -- I have to admit I’m not entirely convinced that Robin was molested or abused as a child.

    In additional posts below I’ve highlighted some excerpts from the book, breaking them into six categories: SEX, BLACK & WHITEY, FOOD & DRUGS, LIES, SHIRKING RESPONSIBILITY and TREATING OTHERS LIKE SHIT.


    * * *

    This is an installment in my 2015 Fact-Finding Mission series.


    [​IMG]

    Howard Stern's Sirius Promises: 10 Years Later
    Private Parts the Book: 20+ Years Later
    Miss America the Book: 20 Years Later
    Unauthorized Howard Stern Biography
    Book: Howard Stern A to Z
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  2. Benjamen

    Benjamen Well-Known Member

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    SEX

    [​IMG]

    (Robin in high school)

    [During her last year of high school, her father fixed her up with the son of a coworker from the steel mill.] “He was an ugly, semiliterate hulk totally devoid of charm, grace or tact. He arrived in his Sunday best, and it didn’t do a thing for him. I, on the other hand, looked wonderful in a form-fitting black velvet number. … The cretin’s eyes almost popped out of his head.”


    [Just out of high school:] “I had on my man-trapping outfit – we’re talking a lime green tennis skirt and a navy blue shell, the colors of the day, and all you could see were legs for days.”

    [​IMG]

    (Robin in college)

    [Robin claims she walked around college with no respect for or interest in men, unlike her friends.] “Still, for all that, the guys liked me. My girlfriends couldn’t understand it. They did everything they could to please these guys, but I was the one men came to visit. [After she finally had sex for the first time,] “The campus grapevine started to sizzle with my name. ... This was when I first became Robin Quivers, mystery woman.”

    [Robin began an affair with a short coworker at the hospital (“Dwayne was hung like a mule. I used to joke that God used so much of him to make his dick, there wasn’t much left for the rest of him.”), who already had a serious girlfriend, and she was dumped. (Noticing scratch marks on the guy’s back one night in bed, Robin realized she was no match for his girlfriend in the passion department.) Robin decided to make this guy’s life “a living hell” at work. He eventually begged Robin’s brother to get Robin off his case. Her brother called her and said, “Robin, I don’t know what you do to people, but you scare them.”]


    [​IMG]

    (Robin in the air force, from the book Unauthorized Howard Stern Biography)

    [In the air force, where she worked as a nurse at a base in Ohio:] “So what do you do when you’re feeling bored, unfulfilled, and you’re me? You have an affair with a married man. … Bradley was smitten with me right away and made no secret of his intentions when we met at the Officer’s Club.”

    [She soon moved on to another officer.] “David had just had a circumcision a week before our first night together. He was under doctor’s orders not to even get aroused, but we wound up busting a stitch or two that night. David was a very good lover, and I developed quite an appetite for this young man.”

    [One morning Robin had an instinct that something was up, and she needed to check out David’s place. She saw a strange red car out front. She rang and rang the bell, with no answer. She went to a phone booth and called him, then saw an Asian woman zooming by in the same red car that was in front of David’s house. Robin insensitively told David she’d seen “Suzy Wong” drive away, then went to his place and ripped the lion print bed sheets off his bed, which she’d bought him as a gift.]


    [​IMG]

    (Robin in San Francisco)

    [In San Francisco, in her mid-20s, Robin walked to a donut shop for a late night snack and met a guy.] “He wound up walking me home and, after the world’s fastest courtship, I sneaked him past hotel reception and into a first floor bathroom so that we could be alone for a few minutes, if you catch my drift. At that moment, I didn’t even know his name and never really expected to see him again.”


    [Although she doesn’t go into here, we now know that the guy gave Robin spontaneous anal sex in that bathroom.]




    “His legs were as hard as rocks. He was the most incredible lover, and after having sex with him in a parked car at the beach, I discovered something a little disturbing about myself. My car was parked right next to a truck, and the whole time we were making love, I knew we were being watched. I think that’s what made it so exciting. When we finished, the guys in the truck applauded and I didn’t feel the least bit embarrassed.”


    “In California, when I determined that relationships weren’t my thing, I’d tried turning to the sex trade for an outlet.”


    [Robin thinks her newfound exhibitionism “coupled with my desire to entertain” is what made her look into becoming a stripper:] “I found myself auditioning for a porno film director, allowing him to take a Polaroid of me naked, then I made an appointment at a strip club. … The first thing I noticed when I walked into her office was a life-size poster of Blaze Starr … a world-famous stripper and Baltimore celebrity.” [Is this why she named her horse Blaze? Robin toured the club and accepted a wig for her performance the next day, but ultimately decided not to return.]


    [​IMG]

    (Robin in Los Angeles)

    [After spending a few days in Los Angeles, Robin was approached by a man she later determined to be a pimp, who had an interest in turning her out.] “He knew men, white men, who would pay for certain services.”

    [Robin had the pimp – an old, black war vet in a wheelchair -- meet her in her hotel room.] “’Stand up and take off your clothes,’ he ordered. ‘I have to inspect the merchandise.’ I stood and removed what I was wearing. He beckoned for me to come closer, and when I did he leaned forward, wrapping his lips around one of my nipples.” [Robin told him she didn’t approve, and he left. She had her parents Western Union her busfare to come home.]


    [​IMG]

    (Robin in 1984, working at WNBC)

    [Later, when living in New York and undergoing intense psychotherapy, battling depression, anger issues and thoughts of suicide:] “I’d spent entire weekends in bed masturbating, which was difficult because I could no longer conjure up the image of a naked man. It had been a long time between romances, so I turned to Playgirl for inspiration. I’d drive to out-of-the-way magazine stores to avoid the embarrassment of having the corner deli owner who sold me the newspaper know what I was after. Once armed, I could stay busy under the covers for hours until I passed out.”


    “Occasionally masturbating wasn’t enough. On those nights, I’d find myself climbing into my car with the intention of going to a bar and picking up a stranger.”


    “On my nighttime prowls, I’d drive by sex shops and want to go inside. It became harder and harder to just keep driving. Then I was gripped by another compulsion. I almost acted on the urge one day as I crossed a street not far from my apartment in Queens. There was only one car on the street, and it was stopped at a red light. As I was about to pass it, I felt an overwhelming desire to rip open my shirt at the driver’s window. It took an incredible effort to resist the urge and keep walking.”

    [​IMG]


    “[On a solo trip to the Bahamas]: To my delight, I met a white Bahamian – who even knew there was such a thing? – while on a snorkeling trip. While I wasn’t really into his blond, blue-eyed good looks, that accent was killing me. By the end of an incredibly pleasant evening together, I knew I was a goner. I hadn’t made love in a long time, and I was terribly nervous, but this young man made me feel appreciated all night long. I have no idea where Philip got his stamina. After he left the next morning, I was pleased that both my private parts and my womanly wiles were still in working order.”


    “I felt that I possessed an incredible power over men when we were having sex. Just as many prostitutes report, men seemed to be under my spell in that context, totally subject to my will, and that’s the way I liked it. “
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  3. Benjamen

    Benjamen Well-Known Member

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    BLACK & WHITEY


    “[Growing up in a lower-class Baltimore neighborhood,] there really wasn’t anyone around to teach me how to be black.”

    “[In high school,] I was entering my black radical period. I came to believe that there was no way for blacks and whites to live together. My solution to every problem became KILL WHITEY.”

    “A bunch of my black friends and I sat around one day [in high school] trying to come up with a word for white people that would have the same impact as ‘ni99er.’ I still don’t know where I first heard the word ‘honkey,’ but that was the word we chose. If a white person pissed us off, we’d whisper ‘honkey’ under our breaths. … I imagined white people cringing in pain, devastated that I’d resorted to the H word.”

    “When I got up in the morning, I smiled at myself in the mirror, and while I washed my face I said out loud, ‘I like being black. I like being black. I like being black.’”

    From watching boxer Sonny Liston, she deduced: “You could have a pretty good life in America if you had skills white people could exploit and you stayed in your place.”

    [​IMG]

    [About the misguided blacks from lower-class Baltimore who didn't attach their wagon to a rising star white male DJ like she did, she writes:] “Even as I was throwing off the chains imposed on me by my family and community as a young girl, I thought the other children would see what I was doing and adopt my behavior. … When it appeared that I was leaving them behind, I tried to make my gestures bigger so that the trail to the exit road couldn’t be missed. But no matter how many crumbs of bread I scattered along the road, nobody ever took up the path.”



    FOOD & DRUGS


    [In the air force:] “In no time at all, I discovered that marijuana mixed well with music, sex and sugar. … I sort of liked being a druggie and getting away with using illegal substances when the air force was so dead set against it. … [David and I] even entertained the idea of going into the drug business for a while, but only to cover the cost of our habit.”


    [​IMG]

    “[During her last six months in the air force:] My diet went to hell too. If it hadn’t been for McDonald’s, Burger King, and Wendy’s, I would have starved. I developed this strange notion that I had to hide being single, so when I went to a fast food place, I ordered enough for two. The only thing that really made me feel better was ice cream. Soon it became my entire diet. I was putting away up to a gallon a day, and I didn’t feel secure unless there was at least a half gallon in the freezer. I stocked up every day, I was eating so much, and took to rotating stores so that the clerks wouldn’t see me every day. My favorite was Friendly’s Vanilla Chocolate Chip. There was a whole circuit of Friendly’s stores that I visited. At holiday time, I liked the yule log and eggnog flavors too.”

    “As the doctor explained it, I was a mess physically as well as emotionally. The strain of all the fighting over the past year had sent me to the refrigerator, and the tension showed big time on my thighs. My pounding heart was caused by high blood pressure. The doctor told me that if I didn’t lose weight, stop smoking, and calm down in a month, he’d be forced to put me on medication that I would have to take for the rest of my life. When I got home, I was completely in tears. Here I was, not even thirty, and my body was falling apart.”


    [​IMG]

    “I had withdrawn, had no energy, and was eating everything in sight. My ice cream addiction returned in full force. I had already become familiar with all the Friendly’s restaurants in Queens and had discovered a few supermarket brands of vanilla chocolate chip that I liked.”


    “The energy it took to maintain my façade [when hanging around Howard with the Stern family] required frequent sugar fixes. On the way home, I’d head to the nearest place that had candy or ice cream.”


    “I felt pretty sorry for myself, sitting in my apartment alone on weekends and holidays, double-ordering Chinese food to hide the fact that I was by myself.”
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  4. Benjamen

    Benjamen Well-Known Member

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    LIES

    “For years, I hadn’t told a soul a thing about myself unless it was a lie.”

    [In D.C., Howard signed a deal to work on WNBC without her.] "From that moment on, I guess I hated Howard. In my mind, the man I knew was dead to me. He had betrayed me every bit as my father had, but I wasn’t eleven years old anymore. Now I could do real damage. I refused to speak to him or take his calls. When he insisted on trying to find out what was wrong, I sat down at my typewriter in the newsroom and composed a letter. I called him names I knew would hurt and accused him of things I knew he hadn’t done. Every other word was ‘fuck’ or ‘motherfucker,’ and to top things off, I accused him of being a racist.’”

    [In Miss America, Howard claims that in the letter, Robin even resorted to calling him the devastating H word: Honkey.]

    [After Howard went to WNBC in New York and Robin lost her job in D.C., she went back to Baltimore. In a subsequent interview with Washingtonian magazine: ] “I claimed that Howard was trying to control what I said on the air by turning down the volume on my microphone – an out-and-out lie, but what was I going to say? I also alleged that Howard had betrayed a verbal agreement when he signed the contract with NBC without me.”

    [​IMG]


    SHIRKING RESPONSIBILITY

    [Robin was overpaid $10,000 for her services during her first 18 months in the air force. She became the subject of a criminal investigation (which determined it was a mistake due to clerical error), but she was ordered to pay back the money. Because this meant extending her air force service from two years to two years and six months, she then went on a “shopping frenzy,” reasoning that she deserved some new things to make it bearable (the only thing she remembers buying in her frenzy is a color TV), and ran up all of her credit cards. She seemingly stopped paying her bills after leaving the air force, and it took years for her to get another credit card.]

    “I still owed the air force a few grand, but my military lawyer assured me that they’d never come after me for such a paltry sum. Even though I’d promised to set up a new payment schedule as soon as I found a job, I was leaving the air force without looking back.”

    [Robin did not make good on her promise. Ten years later, while working in New York with Howard, she was upset when she opened her income tax return and saw that the government had withdrawn the money she still owed the air force.]

    [When she moved to New York to join Howard at WNBC, Howard and Alison wrote her a personal check so that she could afford to move into her own apartment.]

    “I lost track of time and forgot to pay bills. ... When tax time rolled around, having to file forms for both Maryland and New York overwhelmed me. I took all the forms and shoved them into a drawer and forgot about them.”


    TREATING OTHERS LIKE SHIT


    “My mother used to tell me that she beat us because she loved us, and although I don’t think I ever believed that, when I was in charge of the foster kids [as an early teen], I beat them too.”

    [After living in the dorms, then moving back home:] "Two years away from [my mother] had only made me more of a tyrant upon my return. She now believed I was everything I said I was. I was scary. Nothing stopped me. What I said I’d do, I did. What I said I wanted, I got. The rules that seemed to apply to everyone else didn’t apply to me. The whole family tiptoed around me.”

    [After moving back home from California and paying rent, Robin felt entitled:] “I thought nothing of letting the newspaper I’d been reading drop to the floor because one of my ‘servants’ would happily pick it up. An enormous anger surfaced whenever I was at home, and I used it to bend my family to my will. Finally, I was the chosen one I had so desperately wanted to be as a kid.” [It's well-known that at work, even at Sirius, Robin leaves her newspapers and trash on the floor, expecting an intern or coworker to pick them up after her.]

    [In D.C.,] “With Howard’s unwitting help, I had begun to jog. I imagined that his face was under my feet every time I took a step. The faster my pace, the more I got to smash his face into the ground.”

    [While working at WNBC, Robin says she became suicidal, and eventually began psychotherapy to help her deal with her own problems, as well as her coworkers.] “For weeks, I spent my sessions screaming and cursing [Howard]. The little irritations I was carefully keeping track of had grown into a mountain by now, one that seemed impossible to climb.”

    “When [Howard] interrupted me [on the air], it set off what I call my ‘disrespect’ radar detection system, which alerted me to any attack on my pride or self-esteem.” [Her constant screaming at him off-air made Howard tense. So when she went to Howard’s office to confront him about his latest offense – interrupting her on the air,] "Howard gripped the edge of his desk with both hands, leaned forward, and started yelling at me. My God, I thought, look what you’ve done to him. He thinks the words ‘I need to talk’ mean ‘I need to attack you.’ It was then that I realized I’d been beating up on Howard, and I didn’t want to do that anymore.”

    “[Due to her paranoia,] I believed I was being attacked on all sides. Unfortunately, Gary and the interns bore the brunt of most of my white-hot anger without realizing that it wasn’t due to anything they’d done.”

    [​IMG]

    [After Jackie and others became voices on the show:] “Now there were three people to compete with for talk time, and whenever I got cut off, my blood pressure would rise. I began to hate all of them. Everyone who sat on the other side of that glass became my enemy.”

    “I’d had a bad morning and was about to have a blackout from rage when [Gary] found me in the newsroom.” [Gary needed to talk to Robin about Howard's upcoming birthday party.]
    “Gary,” I warned him, “you’d better leave. … If you don’t leave now, I can’t be responsible for what happens next. … That’s when I lost it. I just screamed and yelled and spat. I don’t know what I was saying. I didn’t even believe some of it, but I said it anyway. The best way to describe what happened was that I accused everyone by name, from Howard on down, of doing something awful to me, then expressed a great deal of dislike for the whole lot.”

    [​IMG]

    [Note: Robin no longer attends psychotherapy, claiming to have been cured of mental illness in the '90s.]

    [END]
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  5. DiamondGoddess

    DiamondGoddess Born Ready for My Close-Up! Gold

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    Jeebus, Benjamen, mega-kudos to you for this!!!

    And Howard looks like a fat Palestinian in that one pic, lols.
     
  6. Nemo

    Nemo Beer Can Thick Gold

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  7. Murcielago

    Murcielago Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast

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    The only thing that horribly written pile of shit was ever good for.
     
  8. HorseFanNetwork

    HorseFanNetwork Well-Known Member

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    granted in robins defense, she was already fucked up from birth and her dad molesting her didnt help much.
     
    AmishGirl and Caffeinated like this.
  9. The Booey

    The Booey Well-Known Member

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    I wonder what Obama would score on that test.
     
  10. bobblebooey

    bobblebooey Well-Known Member VIP

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  11. GIRLY

    GIRLY OV

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  12. GaryPuppet

    GaryPuppet Well-Known Member

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  13. Nemo

    Nemo Beer Can Thick Gold

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    Before Robin writes her book Rosanne Barr, Latoya Jackson and a few others wrote books that included molestation allegations by parents discovered through hypnosis therapy as adults.
    I recently listened to Stern shows from that time. Robin was not shying away from make fun of Rosanne. Quivers initiated lots the mockery of her throughout these shows.
    It always bothered me that she waited for Alzheimer to take her father and then public shame him in a book.
    Robin is a monster.
     
  14. Butcher

    Butcher ?

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    Brown round mounds
     
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  15. HorseFanNetwork

    HorseFanNetwork Well-Known Member

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    i was just trying to be fair but the truth revealed itself, bitch is a monster.through and through.
     
  16. Ta Ta Toothy

    Ta Ta Toothy Well-Known Member

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    Wow. Just wow. Robin really is the poster girl of mental illness.

    I never really liked Robin as a person, but reading this makes me hate that bitch with a passion. I've always hoped someone from the show will one day write a tell-all book because I wanted to hear what they really thought of Howard. Now I want to read that book for all the venom that will surely be sprayed in Robin's direction. That's the book I wanna read!
     
  17. BatmiteReturns

    BatmiteReturns Well-Known Member

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    In my best Hateman voice....

    "CUNT, SHE'S A CUNT, SHE'S A CUNT, SHE'S A CUNT"

    Wow,

    [During her last year of high school, her father fixed her up with the son of a coworker from the steel mill.] “He was an ugly, semiliterate hulk totally devoid of charm, grace or tact. He arrived in his Sunday best, and it didn’t do a thing for him. I, on the other hand, looked wonderful in a form-fitting black velvet number. … The cretin’s eyes almost popped out of his head.”

    Quite the opinion of herself eh? 34 seems a bit low on the narcissist scale imo.
     
  18. Lola

    Lola little-known member

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    Wow that was great. Interesting stuff, thanks for posting! :cheer2:
     
  19. Benjamen

    Benjamen Well-Known Member

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    A couple things I left out, but which speak to her 34:

    Although Robin acknowledges she always wanted to be recognized as special as a child, her 6th grade teacher recognized her as special in a way Robin didn't intend. As a result, Robin was placed in the "stupid class" in 7th grade. Robin of course blames her teacher for this. She claims Mrs. Green hated her unjustly from day one, because she'd had Robin's cousin in class in a previous year. Robin says Mrs. Green simply put her in the slow class as "one last twist of the knife." (Robin goes on to admit that after being placed in the slow class, she was “embarrassed about being in such a low-ranked class and … for the first time in my life, I decided to take school seriously.”) On a side note, Robin would've probably been in 6th grade when she alleged her father abused her.

    Robin had only been in broadcasting for a little over a year before hitching her wagon to Howard’s rising star. And they only worked together for a little over a year before Howard left for New York. So Robin was still very green in the industry when she joined the award-winning WNBC news team. Her being hired meant someone else (a young black man) had to be fired. Robin’s boss was unhappy with the way Robin wrote her copy, and always insisted on revisions – which only outraged Robin. (Robin told her psychotherapist that her boss was trying to murder her.) Robin was eventually sent for speech coaching, from the same person who coached Oprah. According to the coach, Robin had a problem with the letter S, and she didn’t emphasize certain key words when reading. Before Robin’s six weeks in speech coaching were up, her WNBC newscasts were handed to someone else. Robin was no longer Howard’s newsperson. Now that Judy D’Angelis was named newsperson on the show, Robin was essentially there just to be Howard’s laugh track. “Being taken off the news was one thing, but watching and listening to Howard working cheerily with Judy was intolerable. … I went for Howard like a screaming banshee after the show.”
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  20. beetlejosh

    beetlejosh I got a head that's large Gold

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    Alright baby, get on all four...I'm gonna lick your ass & grease you up.
    I need to take your temperature.
    Don't worry, I put a chunk of vaseline on the tip of my dick!