Racist earth ripping Africa apart

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by NOT Benjy Bronk, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. NOT Benjy Bronk

    NOT Benjy Bronk New Member Banned User

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  2. Danny

    Danny New Member

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    Picture half of the African continent splitting up, moving towards the United States, and crashing into the Hamptons. :D
     
  3. username

    username Well-Known Member VIP

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    Its fun: Africa gets more aid than any other continent. In 1960 they were at the same level as east asia countries like Taiwan, South Korea and so on. Now many asian countries have surpassed western countries.

    Every single road, hospital and infrastructure built in Aftica is from the colonial time. Still the leftys blame all of Africa's problem because or evil westerners who colonized Africa.

    The simple fact is this: Africa had a 100000 year head start of aryan countries. Somehow all great inventions and companies are invented by white/yellow and semitic people. Blacks have never in history managed to create a working society. Why? They have on average 60 IQ in africa. That is retarded. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IQ_and_the_Wealth_of_Nations

    (the fucking leftys have deleted the list of average IQ in the wikipedia article.)
     
  4. hollywoodrose

    hollywoodrose Member VIP

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    Check out the documentary "Guns, Germs and Steel" - it's on Netflix if you have it. It'll answer all those questions for you. Civilization is all based up availability of natural resources and what those resources are. Survival conditions for basic life and the best conditions for an evolving, advanced society are not always the same thing. Societies only advance once it can provide more food than it needs to feed itself.


    First you need to evolve beyond hunting and gathering and have the ability, climate and resources to farm effectively. If that's possible then a small part of the population can farm and grow enough food for everyone, while other people can take up new trades to address other needs. Then you get a currency system, evolving technology, transportation and trade with foreign regions. Ultimately it comes down to a role of the dice about where you're born in the world that determines if a society can advance beyond the hunter/gatherer, "stone age" model. And yeah westerners carved up Africa the same way Beth carves up a fresh pile of hay.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2013
  5. Beth143nacho

    Beth143nacho Well-Known Member VIP

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    Africa has no resources? Uhhhhhh...

    africa had no leadership... When Liberia can have a military leader named "general buck naked" and it's rebel leader goes into the presidents office, rips the presidents heart out and consumes it in front of him as he dies... It's not the sign of lack of resources. See also: vice guide to Liberia.
     
  6. reno

    reno VIP Extreme Gold

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    Daniel Carver said they diamonds squishing up between their toes.
     
  7. MyLazyHand

    MyLazyHand Russia and France Know What to Do

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    The rebels that Obama is supporting in Syria also eat their opponents. Gee, that's the kind of people we should support...right?
     
  8. Woof

    Woof Liver Shots? VIP

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    Do they eat 'da poo poo'?????
     
  9. TehLivingDeath

    TehLivingDeath New Member Banned User

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    Africa's two main resources: AIDS and flies.
     
  10. TehLivingDeath

    TehLivingDeath New Member Banned User

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    Of course. Why do you think they're brown!
     
  11. TehLivingDeath

    TehLivingDeath New Member Banned User

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    I agree with this. Blacks, as a general rule, are dumber than dirt. IMO, the only reason they've been able to achieve small successes thus far is thanks to cross-pollination via horny slave owners and mudsharks.
     
  12. Vashier

    Vashier VIP Extreme Gold

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    Racist Earth, wasn't that the name of a richard christi band?
     
  13. booybob

    booybob Well-Known Member Banned User

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    Cell Phones Are making the African Blacks More Violent. I guess this is the latest attempt to blame their savage activities on something other than themselves.

    Technology and Collective Action: The Effect of Cell Phone Coverage and Political Violence in Africa

    Tags: Africa, communication, mobile tech, technology, telecommunications

    [​IMG]

    • Research Findings
    • Teaching Notes
    • Feedback

    [​IMG] Much research and media attention has been devoted to exploring rapidly emerging African countries in recent years. In addition to extraordinarily high GDP growth rates, many African countries have seen their middle classes grow substantially and demand goods and services that were formerly available only to individuals in more developed countries. Cell phone use in Africa has increased significantly in recent years; its nearly 649 million mobile users in 2011 made it the second-largest market for mobile phones in the world after Asia.
    Furthermore, the continent has the fastest-growing cell phone market in the world, maintaining an annual growth rate of almost 20% since 2007. This has substantially contributed to economic development within the continent as a result of various innovations and improvements, from mobile banking to faster communications between merchants and customers, as the World Bank notes. In Kenya, the success of the mobile banking system M-pesa has opened the door for a multitude of mobile phone tech startups, prompting some to refer to the country as the “Silicon Savannah.†(It should be noted, however, that mobile phone technology in Africa frequently does not afford robust Internet access, with all its innovation potential.)
    The benefits of mobile technology in other regions are widely hailed. The availability of cell phones and use of social media is often credited with playing a key role in the Arab Spring, which toppled dictatorships in Egypt and Tunisia, and sparked protest movements throughout the Middle East and North Africa. In Mozambique, cell phones have been shown to improve voter education and political participation, while in Namibia cell phone usage has allowed citizens to hold their government officials more accountable and reduce corruption. Although much research has been done on the rise of technology in the developing world and its positive dimensions for politics, very little research has been done regarding possible negative externalities of increased communications capacity, such as improving the organizational abilities of violent groups to incite more conflict.
    A 2013 paper from Duke University and the German Institute of Global and Area Studies published in the American Political Science Review, “Technology and Collective Action: The Effect of Cell Phone Coverage and Political Violence in Africa,†examines the impact that cell phones have had on violent conflict on the continent. The authors, Jan H. Pierskalla and Florian M. Hollenbach, utilize conflict data from the UCDP Georeferenced Event Data Set, which includes data on organized violence from 1989 to 2010, and data on cell phone coverage from the GSM Association, a global association of mobile phone service providers. The authors use various statistical techniques to account for economic, social and geographical factors related to conflict and to determine whether there is indeed an association between cell phone coverage and violent conflict in the context of Africa.
    Key findings include:

    • Even when confounding variables such as income, inequality, ethnic fractionalization, geography are accounted for, increases in cell phone coverage are associated with higher levels of violence throughout Africa.
    • When evaluated on an individual country level, the impact of cell phone coverage on conflict is also significant within each country.
    • Greater cell phone coverage leads to more conflict in “areas with structural conditions that favor violence†than those where the conditions do not favor violence; it “enables groups to overcome their collective action and coordination problems more easily, which translates to more organized conflict events.â€
    • The authors conclude that “cell phones lead to a boost in the capacity of rebels to communicate and monitor in-group behavior, thus increasing in-group cooperation. Furthermore, cell phones allow for coordination of insurgent activity across geographically distant locations.â€
    “We do not believe,†the researchers caution, “that the spread of cell phone technology has an overall negative effect on the African continent. The increase in violence induced by better communication might represent a short-term technological shock, while the positive effects of better communication networks on growth and political behavior may mitigate root causes of conflict in the long run.†The authors suggest that more research must be done to determine how communication technology, such as cell phones, impacts various forms of collective action, whether violent or non-violent, in Africa. They also note that prior research on the connection between cell phone capacity and violence — namely, the 2012 working paper “Is the Phone Mightier than the Sword? Cell Phones and Insurgent Violence in Iraq†— observed the opposite effect: Mobile technology was associated with decreased insurgent violence in Iraq.