Radio's Rule Breaker -- CBS' Chris Oliviero

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Nemo, Mar 11, 2014.

  1. Nemo

    Nemo Beer Can Thick Gold

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    http://www.cbsradio.com/executives?bio=chris-oliviero
    :facepalm:
    ChrisOlivieroEVP, ProgrammingCBS Radio
    [​IMG]







    http://www.radioink.com/Article.asp?id=2766696&spid=24698

    Chris Oliviero didn’t follow the typical path to radio success. He didn’t work in a small market for years, the way so many in our industry preach. He didn’t move from city to city so he could take the next logical step up the radio ladder. And he didn’t expect a job to be handed to him just because it was his turn. Oliviero worked harder than anyone else, he was more aggressive than anyone else, and when a job description didn’t seem to fit, he created a new one and sold it to his superiors. And he says radio is ripe for more people like him. Oliviero is on the cover of the current issue of Radio Ink magazine. He paved his own way to the corporate offices of CBS Radio and it's a road he believes many others can travel, if they work hard, get the right opportunity, and break a few rules. Here's a portion of that interview.

    Oliviero started his radio career in 1996 as an intern on The Howard Stern Show. That was after he was rejected for an internship at his dream station, WFAN, by Eric Spitz, now director of programming for CBS Sports Radio. “Yes, I did reject Chris when he first applied for an internship at WFAN,†Spitz says. “Apparently, when Michael Jordan was a high school sophomore, he was cut by the varsity basketball coach. Mistakes happen. Both Chris and Michael used these rejections as motivation to excel in their respective fields — and can now both say that they have graced the cover of a magazine.â€

    As a diehard New York sports fan who was 10 years old when WFAN first went on the air, Oliviero was devastated and heartbroken when Spitz rejected him. He says, “It was one of those typical stories where on one hand you get some bad news, then a couple of weeks later, you get good news.†The good news? Oliviero was accepted for the Stern internship. When Stern producer Gary Dell’Abate asked Oliviero how many hours he could work, Oliviero said, “As many as you can give me.†So they put him to work five days a week, eight hours a day.

    Oliviero gives Dell’Abate an enormous amount of credit for his career. “I learned work ethic from him,†he says. “He was so influential, because after interning there and getting part-time hours, he gave me the best advice. He called me into his office one day and said, ‘You can’t work here anymore.’ I turned white. I was heartbroken. He said, ‘You could stay here. We’d love to keep you here. But I know you want to do more in your career. You want to achieve more. You have to leave to achieve more.'" Dell’Abate helped Oliviero land a job at WFAN by placing a call to Mark Chernoff for him, and Oliviero was hired part-time, beginning what he calls his CBS Radio merry go-round in New York. He came through the door as an intern and advanced to work in various departments and stations throughout the New York cluster, gaining an enormous amount of experience. And seeing his hard work, CBS continued to give Oliviero more opportunities.

    It was clear to then-CBS Radio CEO Joel Hollander that Oliviero was destined for greatness. “Everyone thought I was crazy when we elevated Chris to a management position when he was so young,†Hollander recalls. “His listening skills, work ethic, and follow-through are unmatched for a young executive. In a business that has had trouble developing young managers, he is clearly a shining light. I would be quite surprised if he is not running a company one day.â€.................................
    more at link..

    http://www.radioink.com/Article.asp?id=2766696&spid=24698
     
  2. illini fan

    illini fan New Member VIP

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    Oliviero gives Dell’Abate an enormous amount of credit for his career. “I learned work ethic from him,” he says. “He was so influential, because after interning there and getting part-time hours, he gave me the best advice. He called me into his office one day and said, ‘You can’t work here anymore.’ I turned white. I was heartbroken. He said, ‘You could stay here. We’d love to keep you here. But I know you want to do more in your career. You want to achieve more. You have to leave to achieve more.'"


    This from a monkeybrain that's 99%... or is it 98% convinced that Howard's hair is really is own hair....

    :facepalm:
     
  3. Nemo

    Nemo Beer Can Thick Gold

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