Republican Party on Free Trade

Discussion in 'The Bar' started by mingmen, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. mingmen

    mingmen New Member

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    Republican Party on Free Trade

    * International trade has become the world’s most powerful economic force. We must secure America’s competitive advantage by preventing other countries from erecting barriers to innovation. We propose to:Revitalize the World Trade Organization negotiations on agriculture and services.
    * Give the next president fast-track negotiating authority.
    * Negotiate reductions in tariffs on U.S. industrial goods and the elimination of other trade barriers so that our autos, heavy machinery, textiles, and other products will no longer be shut out of foreign markets.
    * Take action against any trading partner that uses pseudo-science to block importation of U.S. bioengineered crops.
    * Advance a Free Trade Area of the Americas to take advantage of burgeoning new markets at our doorstep.
    * Revise export controls to tighten control over military technology and ease restrictions on technology already available commercially.

    Source: Republican Platform adopted at GOP National Convention Aug 12, 2000

    Promote free trade with America setting the standards
    Republicans are confident that the worldwide trade agenda is full of promise. Tariffs should be cut further. The U.S. can back private sector efforts to streamline common standards and deregulate services. America can set the standards and be at the center of a web of trade, finance, and openness. If some nations choose to opt out, they will see how other countries accepting economic freedom will advance on their own. This is a vision of private initiative encouraged, not stifled, by governments.
    Source: Republican Platform adopted at GOP National Convention Aug 12, 2000

    Time for a reality check, Bushbots :giggle:
     
  2. mingmen

    mingmen New Member

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    Tea Party Candidates May Eschew GOP Position on Trade
    by Dustin Ensinger on September 27, 2010 - 2:00pm

    As the Tea Party causes the Republican party to lurch further and further to the right on many issues, the insurgent campaigns of many of the group’s endorsed candidates could prove to be an unforeseen victory for opponents of “free trade.”

    After winning in 24 of 51 competitive primaries, the Tea Party movement is upending the Republican establishment, and having a major influence on the party’s agenda. In the recently released “Pledge to America,” the issue of trade expansion, a long-time hallmark of the Republican Party, is not even mentioned.

    Propelled by a wave of anger at government among average Americans, Tea Party candidates have not wavered far from Republican orthodoxy - tax cuts, less spending, less regulation. However, polls have shown that average Tea Party members are fed up with American trade policy and want to restore the nation’s manufacturing base - even if it takes government action to do so.

    The June poll, conducted by the Alliance for American Manufacturing, found that among self identified Tea Party members, 57 percent say the federal government should be involved in offering incentives and structuring trade policy to revitalize and protect American manufacturing. Another 27 percent say the government should do whatever it takes to restore the nation’s manufacturing base. Just 12 percent of Tea Party members say the government should do nothing to aid the manufacturing base.

    The poll also found that 52 percent of Tea Party supporters believe that as long as the U.S. government can stop unfair trade practices, illegal subsidies and enforce environmental and labor standards, the U.S. can successfully compete with anyone in the global marketplace. Another 40 percent say while it is unlikely that American companies will ever be able to compete on even footing with foreign manufacturers, the government should still do whatever it can to make competition more fair. Just 7 percent said that the government should be resigned to the fact that it cannot compete and give up.

    And perhaps the most perplexing of the poll's findings, self identified Tea Party supporters, by a 74 percent to 15 percent margin, say they favor a centralized national manufacturing strategy that would ensure the nation’s economic, tax, labor and trade policies work in concert with one another to support the manufacturing sector.

    Those findings put the Tea Party movement squarely at odds with traditional Republican positions of expanded trade, less government intervention and no state support for selected industries.

    That could create a major rift in the Republican Party, whose 2004 party platform called for further cuts to tariffs, completion of the Doha round of global trade talks, fast-track negotiating authority for the president and, of course, deregulation of financial services.

    “Whereas in the recent past it was generally (but not always) Republicans who supported trade expansion agreements and generally (but not always) Democrats who did not, a more stridently populist Republican Party would further erode the support for trade agreements in Congress even if Republicans take back the House of Representatives November 2,” Eric Farnsworth, Vice President of the Council of the Americas, writes at The National Journal.

    With strong opposition already among Democrats in Congress, an influx of dozens of Tea Party candidates in seats held by moderate Democrats likely to support trade deals could spell the end for pending trade pacts with South Korea, Columbia and Panama. However, that populism could erode once they arrive in Congress and are under pressure from Republican leadership, business interests and the corporate-funded Freedom Works, which has led to the populist movement’s rise.

    “Even under the best of circumstances, it would take immense political capital for the White House to move the pending Korea, Colombia, and Panama trade agreements forward—to say nothing of prospects for additional trade expansion efforts,” Farnsworth writes. “A Republican Party increasingly untethered to the free trade agenda would make passage of the agreements virtually impossible.”

    :jj:
     
  3. mingmen

    mingmen New Member

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    but I thought free trade and NAFTA was a Democrat tenet. You mean Ronnie Raygun wasn't a DemoRat? This can't be right
     
  4. mingmen

    mingmen New Member

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  5. mingmen

    mingmen New Member

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    why is the image for this forum a bunch of blaeks staring at you?