Semen news!!!!! Good or bad?

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Shithead, Mar 31, 2015.

  1. Shithead

    Shithead Well-Known Member

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    Diet high in pesticide-laden produce like spinach and strawberries linked to lower sperm count: study
    AFP RELAXNEWS
    Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 9:21 AM
    [​IMG] Getty Images/Purestock
    The study says men shouldn't stop eating produce, but should pick fruits and vegetables with less pesticide residue.
    Higher levels of pesticide residue in fruit and vegetables are associated with lower quality of semen, according to a study published on Tuesday.

    Its authors said the research was only an early step in what should be a much wider investigation.

    In a first recommendation, they urged men not to stop eating fruit and vegetables, and pointed to organically-grown food, or food that is low in pesticides, as options for lowering any apparent risk.

    The U.S. team analyzed 338 semen samples from 155 men attending a fertility center between 2007 and 2012.

    The volunteers were aged between 18 and 55, had not had a vasectomy, and were part of a couple planning to use their own eggs and sperm for fertility treatment.

    The men were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their diet, asking them how often, on average, they consumed portions of fruit and vegetables.

    These portions were then placed into categories of being low, moderate or high in pesticide residues, on the basis of US Department of Agriculture data.

    Peas, beans, grapefruit and onions, for instance, fell into the low category, whereas peppers, spinach, strawberries, apples and pears were in the high category.

    The data factored in whether the items had been peeled and washed before being eaten.

    Men who had the greatest consumption of high-category fruit and vegetables had a total sperm count of 86 million sperm per ejaculate.

    This was 49% less than men who ate the least. They had a sperm count of 171 million per ejaculate.

    In addition, men with the lowest pesticide residue intake had an average of 7.5% of normally-formed sperm — but this tally was nearly a third lower, at 5.1%, among those who had the highest intake.

    There were no significant differences between the low-and moderate-residue groups.

    "To our knowledge, this is the first report on the consumption of fruit and vegetables with high levels of pesticide residue in relation to semen quality," said the study, published in the journal Human Reproduction.

    "These findings suggest that exposure to pesticides used in agricultural production through diet may be sufficient to affect spermatogenesis in humans."

    The study acknowledged limitations: Men attending fertility clinics are prone to having semen quality problems, and the diet in this case was assessed only once and could have changed over time.

    In addition, the pesticide residues were estimated rather than actually measured in the lab, and it was not known whether the fruit and vegetables that were consumed were conventionally-grown or organic.

    "These findings should not discourage the consumption of fruit and vegetables in general," said Jorge Chavarro, assistant professor of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, who co-led the study.

    "In fact, we found that total intake of fruit and vegetables was completely unrelated to semen quality.

    "This suggests that implementing strategies specifically targeted at avoiding pesticide residues, such as consuming organically-grown produce or avoiding produce known to have large amounts of residues, may be the way to go."

    Outside commentators said the research was interesting but limited. Further work was needed to confirm the findings, and see if they applied beyond this small group of men.

    "This paper may cause unnecessary worry," said Jackson Kirkman-Brown of the Birmingham Women's Fertility Centre in central England.

    "Men wishing to optimise their sperm quality should still eat a healthy balanced diet until more data is available," he told Britain's Science Media Centre.
     
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  2. DogStar69

    DogStar69 Well-Known Member

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    Apparently it's not seeping into watermelon.
     
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  3. MrPACS

    MrPACS Well-Known Member

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    Yet another reason to eat organic
     
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  4. wigtropolis

    wigtropolis Well-Known Member

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    pesticide makes my sperm stronger and more virulent.
     
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  5. FishySausage

    FishySausage Original Nuttah VIP Gold

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    Nothing can slow down my boys!
     
  6. OV

    OV Rapscallion

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    "She never went out with soldiers but she knew her share of Semen"
     
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  7. Jayla

    Jayla Ou ai-je l'esprit? Gold

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    I like this word. Gonna work it into conversation somehow.
     
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  8. OV

    OV Rapscallion

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    planning on artificially inseminating it into open ended convo?
     
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  9. Jayla

    Jayla Ou ai-je l'esprit? Gold

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    :lo5:
     
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  10. RumBalls

    RumBalls The original RumBalls, est. Jan 16, 2012

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    [​IMG]
     
  11. chief0124

    chief0124 Well-Known Member

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    Does organic necessarily mean pesticide free? I'm honestly asking because I don't know. I have heard people say that organic actually has MORE pesticide because the GMO crops are engineered to resist pests, while the organic crops are more susceptible to the same pests therefore they need more pesticide. I have no idea if this is true or just pro-GMO misinformation.
     
  12. MrPACS

    MrPACS Well-Known Member

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    No.....they use pesticides that are approved for use in order for plant/veggie life to be certified organic by the USDA.



     
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  13. Skipnoid

    Skipnoid Lick Me!

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    So, then what exactly makes it organic then?
     
  14. Skipnoid

    Skipnoid Lick Me!

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    You just made that up didn't you? ... You didn't actually read all that, did you?
     
  15. MrPACS

    MrPACS Well-Known Member

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    Organic is a labeling term for food or other agricultural products that have been
    produced according to the USDA organic regulations. These standards require the
    integration of cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of
    resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. This means that organic
    operations must maintain or enhance soil and water quality while also conserving wetlands,
    woodlands, and wildlife. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used.
    All organic crops and livestock must be raised in a production system that emphasizes protection of natural resources; plant and animal health; preventative management of pests,
    diseases, and predators; and compliant use of allowed materials. All organic products must
    be protected from prohibited substances and methods from the field to the point of final
    sale, whether it is a raw agricultural commodity or a multi-ingredient, processed product.
    This publication provides an overview of organic certification and provides some
    additional resources for prospective organic farms and businesses.

    What is organic certification?

    Organic certification verifies that your farm or handling facility located anywhere in the
    world complies with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) organic regulations and
    allows you to sell, label, and represent your products as organic. These regulations describe
    the specific standards required for you to use the word “organic” or the USDA organic seal
    on food, feed, or fiber products. The USDA National Organic Program (NOP) administers
    these regulations, with substantial input from its citizen advisory board and the public.
    Your farm or handling facility would be certified by a private, foreign, or State entity. These
    certifying agents are accredited by the USDA and are located throughout the United States
    and around the world. Certifying agents are responsible for ensuring that USDA organic
    products meet or exceed all organic standards. Certification provides the consumer, whether
    end-user or intermediate processor, assurance of the organic product’s integrity.
    Who needs to be certified?
    If your farm or business receives
    more than
    $5,000 in gross annual organic sales, it must
    be certified.
    If your farm or business receives
    less than
    $5,000 in gross annual organic sales, it is considered “exempt” from two key requirements.
    Certification.
    Your farm or business doesn’t need to be certified in order to sell, label, or represent your products as organic. However, you
    may not
    use the USDA organic seal on your
    products or refer to them as
    certified
    organic. If your operation is exempt and you would like
    to use the USDA organic seal, you are welcome to obtain optional organic certification.



    Organic certification is a certification process for producers of organic food and other organic agricultural products. In general, any business directly involved in food production can be certified, including seed suppliers, farmers, food processors, retailers and restaurants.

    Requirements vary from country to country, and generally involve a set of production standards for growing, storage, processing, packaging and shipping that include:

    • avoidance of synthetic chemical inputs (e.g. fertilizer, pesticides, antibiotics, food additives), genetic modification, irradiation, and the use of sewage sludge;
    • use of farmland that has been free from prohibited chemical inputs for a number of years (often, three or more);
    • for livestock, adhering to specific requirements for feed, housing, and breeding;
    • keeping detailed written production and sales records (audit trail);
    • maintaining strict physical separation of organic products from non-certified products;
    • undergoing periodic on-site inspections.
    In some countries, certification is overseen by the government, and commercial use of the term organic is legally restricted. Certified organic producers are also subject to the same agricultural, food safety and other government regulations that apply to non-certified producers.

    Certified organic foods are not necessarily pesticide-free, certain pesticides are allowed.


     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2015
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  16. Jayla

    Jayla Ou ai-je l'esprit? Gold

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    I'd love to take credit for it, but it's in the original article.
     
  17. Senator Rick

    Senator Rick Well-Known Member

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    Pesticide made my tongue the size of Alamogorda, New Mexico & shaped like the mothership in Close Encounters Of The Third Kind.
    Thank God for DDT and ambergris.
     
  18. scoobyla

    scoobyla Well-Known Member

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    the more i research the less i understand
    its a full time job to try to eat healthy, and i still dont know if i am
     
  19. AmishGirl

    AmishGirl Well-Known Member VIP

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    Right?!?

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. Skipnoid

    Skipnoid Lick Me!

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    Oh.
     
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