Sex Ed Teacher Takes Young Students To Sex Toy Shop "The Smitten Kitten"……Meow….

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by teehee, Jun 3, 2015.

  1. teehee

    teehee Friend Of The Friendless VIP

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    Sex Education Teacher Takes Young Students To Sex Toy Shop


    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- A sex education teacher has drawn the ire of parents after taking middle- and high-school students on a field trip to an adult novelty store in Minneapolis.

    Gaia Democratic School director Starri Hedges took about a dozen students to the Smitten Kitten last week. Hedges told the Star Tribune ( http://strib.mn/1I8oMn7 ) that she wanted to provide a safe environment for students to learn about human sexual behavior.

    Besides offering adult books, videos, toys and other products, the store also has educational workshops, which the students attended.


    "What I saw happening on our trip, I thought it was beautiful because kids could talk to these sex educators without any shame, without any fear," Hedges said. Some of her students bought condoms, she said.


    The small K-12 school has a motto that promises academic freedom, youth empowerment and democratic education. Parents say it has about 25 students. Tax records show the school, housed in a Unitarian church, has an annual budget of about $100,000.

    Parent Lynn Floyd's 11- and 13-year-old daughters were on the field trip. Floyd says the trip was "a major breach of trust" and has withdrawn his children from the school. Floyd said he is most troubled that parents were never notified before the trip.

    "I just struggled to think that I wasn't involved in that," he said.

    Hedges said that she "unfortunately didn't communicate well enough with parents ahead of time" about the trip. Pornographic items were off limits to the children, Hedges said, but sex toys and other products were visible.

    Smitten Kitten owner Jennifer Pritchett said the store is an educational resource about sex and sexuality. "We leave it up to the discretion of parents and guardians as to when, if, and in what capacity they seek resources from our educators," she said.

    Minnesota Department of Education spokesman Josh Collins said the state has no authority over the school because it is private. "I don't think anybody would think that going to the Smitten Kitten is a great idea," he said.

    It is not clear whether the field trip broke any laws. A city ordinance said those younger than 18 should not be exposed to "sexually provocative written, photographic, printed, sound, or published materials deemed harmful to minors."

    Minneapolis City Attorney Susan Segal said inspectors visited the store Tuesday and plan to issue a violation notice for failing to comply with the city ordinance and for not complying with a zoning ordinance. She said the store can reconfigure its space or cover the items to comply. Pritchett, the store owner, did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

    Hedges said she probably would not take another class to the store.

    "It was certainly the first time we have taken that kind of field trip and it will probably be our last, which I feel bad (about) because the kids had so much fun," Hedges said.
     
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  2. goldtopper

    goldtopper Well Known Heterosexual Gold

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  3. Mr Fantastic

    Mr Fantastic Found Nemo VIP

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    Stopped off at Hardees on the way there and back. Ooo-faa


    Guilty
     
  4. Beer Chugger

    Beer Chugger Well-Known Member

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    Here's her strategy for safe sex..... eat lots of food..... no one wants to have sex with her. Done.

    "Robin, you should teach her about proper nutrition"
     
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  5. TheMercenary

    TheMercenary Collecting Light Gold

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    image.jpg
     
  6. reno

    reno VIP Extreme Gold

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    Starri Hedges, sounds like the name of a porn star. Fat girl porn.
     
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  7. Rescued Owl

    Rescued Owl VIP Extreme Gold

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    I bet that the kids are relieved that this didn't turn out to be another one of the teacher fucks student stories.
    :chair:
     
  8. smichal

    smichal A1 Dick Game

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    around here those adult stores have blacked out windows and you have to be 18 to go in...?!?!?
     
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  9. Stag

    Stag Well-Known Member VIP

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    Did they learn about glory hole etiquette?
     
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  10. The Nothing 19

    The Nothing 19 Well-Known Member

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    IfTheyOnlyKnew and TheMercenary like this.
  11. Jayla

    Jayla Ou ai-je l'esprit? Gold

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    Urgh. Listening to that girl talk about buttplay made me gag. Yeah, I know, I clicked it on.
     
  12. Skipnoid

    Skipnoid Lick Me!

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    That's Hot.:grad:
     
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  13. Drungle

    Drungle VIP Extreme Gold

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    [​IMG]

    Uggggggggggghhhhh
     
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  14. JameGumb

    JameGumb We're all out of toner!

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    The fucks Minnesota doing? Giving Florida a run for its money?!
     
  15. JameGumb

    JameGumb We're all out of toner!

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    Yeah I don't see that store being open for very much longer.
     
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  16. Head Censor

    Head Censor Turgid Member VIP

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    Ridiculous.


    But here's the thing - if you're stupid enough to send your kid to something called the "Gaia Democratic School", then you deserve whatever you get.
     
  17. Head Censor

    Head Censor Turgid Member VIP

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    It's way worse than you might think. Minneapolis school district administrators have been turning to San Francisco to help them establish school policy. :facepalm:



    http://blogs.citypages.com/blotter/...licy_summons_chaos_in_the_st_paul_schools.php



    Distrust and Disorder: A Racial Equity Policy Summons Chaos in the St. Paul Schools


    By Susan Du Wed., May 27 2015 at 3:00 AM

    A student walks down a Harding High hallway wearing headphones, chanting along to violent rap lyrics. Teacher Erik Brandt taps him on the shoulder. Turn it down, he gestures. The kid stares at Brandt with chilling intensity. He points at the older man, fingers bent in the shape of a gun, and shoots. Then moves on. Within Harding's corridors is a turbulent clutter of students who push and cuss and bully their way from one end of the building to another. Brandt, a finalist for Minnesota's Teacher of the Year and a 20-year veteran of the English department, doubles as a hall monitor. It is his job to somehow tame them.

    When the bell rings, the majority trickle into classrooms. But 50 or so roamers remain. They come to school for breakfast and lunch and to wander the halls with their friends. He commands them to get to class, but his authority is empty. Brandt, a bespectacled Shakespeare devotee who leads Harding's International Baccalaureate program, doesn't know the majority of kids in this school of 2,000 on St. Paul's East Side. Calling the principal on dozens of kids each day is impractical. Written requests for disciplinary action are a toothless paper trail of unenforceable consequence.

    Harding isn't much different than most big city schools. It squats in St. Paul's most economically depressed zip code, where 83 percent of kids receive free or reduced-price lunch. This is a multi-ethnic, multi-national place, the majority the sons and daughters of Asian immigrants.

    By the inverted logic of poverty, some of the lowest-achieving students ironically have the best attendance. Even on snow days, they can still count on free breakfast, heat, and wi-fi.

    Every year kids reach the 12th grade with elementary-level reading skills. Still, the teachers here, who share centuries of experience, say they love their students and they love their jobs. That makes it harder to admit that over the last few years, Harding has suffered a breakdown of safety and order.

    When the bell sounds the start of class, students remain in the halls. Those who tire of lectures simply stand up and leave. They hammer into rooms where they don't belong, inflicting mischief and malice on their peers. Teachers call it "classroom invasion."

    Instructors who break up fights get beaten in the process, thrown into bookcases while trying to bar their doors.

    Says Brandt: "There is a sizable chunk of students that — for a variety of very complex reasons — don't know how to behave in a decent, sociable way with other people in a school setting."

    Harding's tribulations are reflected in schools district-wide, most of which have undergone bold changes. In 2011, St. Paul canceled cross-city busing in order to cut transport costs and boost attendance at neighborhood schools. Sixth-graders were moved to middle schools, which used to house only seventh- and eighth-graders.

    Two years ago, kids who'd spent their academic lives in specialized classrooms for behavioral issues and cognitive disabilities were mainstreamed into general classes, along with all the kids who spoke English as a second language. More than 3,000 made the transition.

    The district also shifted its thinking on discipline, influenced by data that showed black kids being suspended at alarming rates. Such punishment would now come as a last resort. Instead, disruptive or destructive students would essentially receive a 20-minute timeout, receive counseling by a "behavioral coach," then return to class when they calmed down.

    The changes came at the behest of Superintendent Valeria Silva. When she took up the torch of St. Paul's schools in 2009, she inherited an urban district like so many others — one with a dire achievement gap between students of color and their white counterparts.

    She charged teachers with the job of fixing this gap, lest they be complicit in the cycle of poverty among black and brown communities.

    Silva's solution, called Strong Schools, Strong Communities, was touted as "the most revolutionary changes in achievement, alignment, and sustainability seen within SPPS in the last 40 years." At least according to the district's website.

    To kick it off, St. Paul spent more than $1 million on Pacific Educational Group, a San Francisco consulting firm that purports to create "racially conscious and socially just" schools.

    Pacific offered racial equity training for teachers and staff, where they practiced talking about race. Teachers were asked to explore their biases, to preface their opinions with "As a white man, I believe..." or "As a black woman, I think...."

    "The work begins with people looking at themselves and their own beliefs and implicit biases," says Michelle Bierman, the district's director of racial equity. If teachers could recognize their subconscious racism, everyone would work together to bridge the gap.

    The final piece was a tech rollout. Since St. Paul wanted to fit students of widely differing skills into the same classes, teachers needed to customize lessons for individual kids. In 2011, the district invested $4.3 million in Dell for a website that offered videos, homework, and quizzes. But Dell delivered an embarrassingly archaic site, and the deal collapsed within three years. Students received iPads last year instead.

    Teachers were expected to rally to Silva's call. They were to aggressively accelerate the skills of students who'd struggled for years while simultaneously challenging middle-of-the-road learners. And they had to do it while spanning languages from Hmoob to Espanol, Karen, and Soomaali.

    The special ed and foreign language students began arriving in the middle of the 2013 school year. They were thrust into classes far too rigorous for their skills, prompting them to act out and flee.

    Meanwhile, the new discipline plan wasn't working. If a child threw a tantrum, behavioral coaches would intervene with short-term counseling, which often failed to prevent kids from acting out time and time again.

    Becky McQueen, who comes across as a five-foot-three mother hen, heads Harding's college prep program for middle and low-income kids. She says the percentage of kids causing problems at Harding is very small, and they're not all special ed. Last spring, when she stepped into a fight between two basketball players, one grabbed her shoulder and head, throwing her aside.

    Teachers Were Blindsided

    Teachers were expected to rally to Silva's call. They were to aggressively accelerate the skills of students who'd struggled for years while simultaneously challenging middle-of-the-road learners. And they had to do it while spanning languages from Hmoob to Espanol, Karen, and Soomaali.

    The special ed and foreign language students began arriving in the middle of the 2013 school year. They were thrust into classes far too rigorous for their skills, prompting them to act out and flee.

    Meanwhile, the new discipline plan wasn't working. If a child threw a tantrum, behavioral coaches would intervene with short-term counseling, which often failed to prevent kids from acting out time and time again.

    Becky McQueen, who comes across as a five-foot-three mother hen, heads Harding's college prep program for middle and low-income kids. She says the percentage of kids causing problems at Harding is very small, and they're not all special ed. Last spring, when she stepped into a fight between two basketball players, one grabbed her shoulder and head, throwing her aside.

    The kid was only sent home for a couple of days.

    In March, when a student barged into her class, McQueen happened to be standing in the doorway and got crushed into a shelf. The following week, two boys came storming in, hit a girl in the head, then skipped back out. One of them had already been written up more than 30 times.

    Yet another student who repeatedly drops into her class has hit kids and cursed at an aide, once telling McQueen he would "fry" her ass. She tried to make a joke of it — "Ooh, I could use a little weight loss."

    Her students interjected: "No, that means he's gonna kill you."

    Now, to know who to let in, she tells her students to use a secret knock at the door.

    "There are those that believe that by suspending kids we are building a pipeline to prison. I think that by not, we are," McQueen says. "I think we're telling these kids you don't have to be on time for anything, we're just going to talk to you. You can assault somebody and we're gonna let you come back here."

    Harding teachers are terrified the district is sending kids into the world with distorted expectations of reality. They're unprepared for college. They're taught to disrespect authority. Sooner or later, they'll realize they were cheated, Brandt says.

    But most teachers are afraid to speak out. Tenure, after all, doesn't come until after three years on the job. And even those with tenure fear transfers and endless performance evaluations.


    --The article continues for two more pages at the link above --
     
  18. JameGumb

    JameGumb We're all out of toner!

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    Aah. They want to be the liberal haven of the Midwest. Makes sense now. I dated a chick briefly from Minnesota. She was an uber lib.
     
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  19. SleepingWarrior

    SleepingWarrior Well-Known Member VIP

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    It is certainly a weird state politically. Minneapolis is ultra-liberal while just an hour north you have the district that elected Michelle Bachmann.
     
  20. JameGumb

    JameGumb We're all out of toner!

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    Nebraskas like that as well. Omahas a fairly liberal city but the surrounding suburbs are more conservative.