The greatest steadi-cam shots in movies

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by LaserT, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. LaserT

    LaserT You have to have fun. Gold

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    List em... (The stedicam shot. It's one continuous shot with no cuts.)

    Has to be one of the greatest in history. Between the music and shot.....brilliance....

     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2015
  2. Quality Control

    Quality Control dove Gold

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    Welp. That's the one I was going to post, LT.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. stash

    stash 2017 Kimbra of All Media VIP

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  4. LaserT

    LaserT You have to have fun. Gold

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    Another brilliant one. That rug to wood sound is just tension. :scared:
     
  5. Abner Devereaux

    Abner Devereaux Well-Known Member

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    You slammed the door shut already.
     
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  6. stash

    stash 2017 Kimbra of All Media VIP

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  7. Quality Control

    Quality Control dove Gold

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    So accurate it hurts.
     
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  8. hidden dragon

    hidden dragon the princess of darkness Staff Member

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    Kill Bill Vol. 1

     
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  9. JameGumb

    JameGumb We're all out of toner!

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    Goodfellas, imo, the greatest movie ever.
     
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  10. hidden dragon

    hidden dragon the princess of darkness Staff Member

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    That shot is impossible to beat, plus Goodfellas is so aweome.
     
  11. flonsta

    flonsta Well-Known Member

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    Opening shot of "The Player". (Sorry, can't link at the moment. I suck.)
     
  12. Angry Arab

    Angry Arab Well-Known Member VIP

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    Good one. Have you seen room 237? I recommend it... especially concerning that shot.
     
  13. LaserT

    LaserT You have to have fun. Gold

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    It is a great movie and shot.
     
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  14. Avery

    Avery Well-Known Member Banned User

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  15. stash

    stash 2017 Kimbra of All Media VIP

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    I've heard of it. This one's good, guy's got a scottish accent of some sort

     
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  16. JettaTSI

    JettaTSI Member

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    y
     
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  17. hidden dragon

    hidden dragon the princess of darkness Staff Member

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    This :winner:

    Martin Scorsese has another good tracking shot in the movie "Hugo" as well

     
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  18. chapped

    chapped Well-Known Member

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    @SomerSky and I were talking about that scene the other day. ..
     
  19. señor pedro

    señor pedro El Chocha Master Bee Ay Pii Gold

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    :)


    http://filmmakermagazine.com/93916-...and-the-early-days-of-steadicam/#.Vgtf1Jfmle8

    Filmmaker: It’s incredible to me that The Copa Shot from Goodfellas (1990) was blocked, lit and filmed in a half-day before lunch. Walk me through that process.

    McConkey: We did our first walkthrough in the late afternoon — the idea was that we would shoot it at night. Lorraine Bracco and Ray Liotta were there, and Marty said that he wanted it to start with this big close-up of the tip being given to somebody to watch Ray’s car, and then we would walk and follow them. So we walked across the street, went down the stairs (of the Copa’s back entrance), around the corner and down a long hallway. Now, Marty may have just thought that he would have voiceover overtop of the shot, but I was kind of looking at my watch and thinking, “This is already the worst case of shoe leather in the history of cinema. There’s no way this will ever work.” We got to the kitchen and Michael Ballhaus said, “Marty, we have to go into the kitchen.” Marty said, “Why would they go into the kitchen?” And Ballhaus said, “Because the light is beautiful.” “OK, we go in the kitchen.” So we turned the corner and went into the kitchen and then back out the same door. Finally, we get into the club and there’s some dialogue and some action, but I’m thinking the first two minutes of this shot are going to be awful. There’s no way they’ll ever use it. They’re going to cut it to hell.

    Marty looked at me (for my reaction to the rehearsal) and I said, “Yeah sure.” And he said, “Okay, I’ll be back in a couple of hours.” Ray saw the panic in my eyes and asked if I wanted him to stay and help me work the shot out. So Ray and the First Assistant Director Joe Reidy stayed and we started to walk through the shot again.


    Filmmaker: What changed as you continued to rehearse?

    McConkey: There are technical problems when you’re trying to do an uncut shot. You want the wide and you want the tight in the same shot, but how do you connect the two? Do you just wait while the camera trundles in? You can’t do that. So we essentially had to invent a way to edit it in the shot. I had to be wide to follow (Ray and Lorraine) down the stairs, because otherwise it would be a shot of the tops of their heads, but when they got to the bottom of the stairs they turned a corner and they would disappear if I didn’t catch up to them. So I said, “Ray, we have to figure out a way for you to stall at the bottom of the stairs so I can catch up to you.” Joe Reidy said, “We have a lot of extras so we can have a doorman and Ray could talk to him.” Then someone came up with the idea “You know what, Ray should give him a tip.” Now we’re echoing a theme that’s built into the character and built into the movie. Then walking down the hallway I said, “Ray, I really want to see your face now. So we’ve got to figure out a reason for you to turn around.” He said, “Well, I can talk to somebody else in the hall.” So we brought in a couple who were making out and Ray would turn and say, “Every time, you two.” So we structured events within the shot that covered the limitations of not being able to cut in order to give it pace and timing. What I didn’t expect, and what I only figured out later, was that all those (interactions) ended up being the heart and soul of the shot. Because Ray incorporated his character into those moments, those moments actually became what the shot was about instead of being tricks or being artifices.

    Filmmaker: What was Scorsese’s reaction when he returned to set and saw how you’d tweaked the blocking of the shot?

    McConkey: I didn’t know what he was going to think of it. As we were playing it back for him he said, “No! No! No!” I thought, “Oh no, what did I do wrong.” And he said, “No, you don’t understand the table (that is whisked in for Liotta and Bracco) should fly at the camera and fill the frame. When I was a kid I came to a club like this and it was incredible to me and the thing I most remember was the way a table would appear out of nowhere.” So that was the only objection he had.

    Filmmaker: How many takes did you ultimately do and what issues spoiled some of those takes?

    McConkey: We only did I think eight takes and then we went to lunch. It was extraordinarily efficient. One of the issues was I wasn’t sure when Henny Youngman was going to come out onto the stage at the end of the shot. I couldn’t rely on him to follow his cue and be on stage when I panned over. I told Ray, “You’ve got to let me know when it’s safe to pan over to him.” So when (Youngman) came out, Ray would gesture to Lorraine and point to the stage — which was really for me — and I’d pan over and there (Youngman) was.

    We also shot with a BL that had a side-to-side magazine, so as you ran through a shot the camera would get heavier and heavier to one side. To balance the Steadicam I ran half a load of film through until it was at the midpoint and I balanced everything for that. So when I started the shot (the weight) was leaning heavily on one end, then right in the middle of the shot for a few seconds it was cool and then I had to keep fighting and fighting it more and more until the end of the shot. It’s pretty remarkable when I look at that shot now and it looks perfect, because it was almost impossible to (deal with the shifting balance of the film magazine) and be panning and be tilting and all of this other stuff.

    Filmmaker: How did The Copa Shot affect your career? Did it open up any new doors for you?

    McConkey: It’s only been in recent years that I’ve sort of been reaping the rewards in a way. Sometimes now I’ll come on set and maybe somebody who hadn’t met me before will say, “W ow, you did that Copacabana shot!” I understood that people in the business could understand the complexity or the virtuosity or the technical challenges, but I used to wonder did it really matter? Did it actually do a better job of storytelling? What got me was a taxi cab driver a couple of years (after Goodfellas) asked me what I did and I told him I worked in the movies as a Steadicam operator. He said, “Oh, Steadicam, yeah, like that shot in Goodfellas. The Copacabana.” I said, “Yeah, I did that one.” I began to become aware that the public, even if they didn’t know how it was done, really did appreciate being taken on a ride like that. Steadicam really was a powerful way to tell a story and it did have merit and value beyond being a technical feat. It seemed to resonate with people and not just with filmmakers. That was a revelation for me.
     
  20. chapped

    chapped Well-Known Member

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    Fun fact Ray almost ruined that shot by bumping into guy near door and then a fixture. ..
    Both unplanned. .

    As for the technical merits of that shot. ..the hardest part would be getting all the color temperature the same..from the dimly lit street through the kitchen then the stage area...not easy to do and to look right...

    The camera op looks like he just set his focus around 6ft and then mostly stayed at that distance since there would have been no way for an AC to pull focus. .T stop would have been around a 2.8

    Cast had to be rocking wireless mic packs since booming would have been tricky..

    But that is just my guess