These 5 Serial Killers Have Never Been Caught

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by dawg, Oct 29, 2015.

  1. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    5. Jennings 8: Unsolved murders haunt town, police

    these-5-serial-killers-have-never-been-caught-and-they-could-be-in-a-town-near-you-photo-391514.jpg

    In south central Louisiana, in a small town on the edge of Cajun country, a string of eight young women were murdered between 2005 and 2009.

    They all knew each other. Some were related by blood, others shared apartments; they frequented the same bars and low-rent motels. They used and abused drugs together.

    And one-by-one, they all became murder victims.

    Loretta Chaisson Lewis, 28, was the first, her decomposing and partially clothed body found floating in a canal on May 20, 2005.

    Less than a month later, Ernestine Patterson, 30, was found in a different canal with her throat slit, her body discovered by froggers.

    Over the next four years, the toll would mount: Kristen Lopez, 21; Whitnei Dubois, 26; Laconia 'Muggy' Brown, 23; Crystal Benoit Zeno, 24; Brittney Gary, 17; and Necole Guillory, 26.

    Their killings have gained national notoriety, often portrayed as the work of a serial killer. But police documents obtained by WWL-TV suggest a very different and potentially more sinister theory: that police somehow were involved in the killings.

    Rumors of law enforcement involvement in the killings are not new.

    A wide range of circumstances have fueled the rumors that police have blood on their hands, whether with a direct hand in the violence or by covering up the horrible acts of others.

    The speculation starts with one basic fact shared by the victims. Each of the murders remains unsolved.

    Given the violent nature of the murders and the hasty manner in which the bodies were dumped, the lack of progress in solving the cases seems suspicious to many local residents.

    'Nobody seems to be able to find out who's doing the killing. And all these people, we all know them. So why can't the police find out who's killing them?' asked Lionel Batiste, who lives on the south side of Jennings where most of the victims engaged in their high-risk lifestyles.

    Batiste thinks there's more to the mystery than just bad luck or poor detective work.

    'I think it's connected with the police,' he said. 'Because it's too many murders. You can't solve them and it's steady going on, back to back to back. How can you not catch this man?'

    THE KILLING FIELDS

    Then there's the geography of the killings.

    Jennings, a town of about 11,000, sits between Lafayette and Lake Charles along Interstate 10. It's the largest town in Jefferson Davis Parish and the seat of government.

    The paved streets of the town give way to dirt roads as you hit the rice fields and crawfish ponds on the outskirts.

    These flat farmlands should be peaceful, but in almost every direction, the roads here lead to dark reminders of what happened to the eight young murder victims.

    In each case, their bodies were dumped along the rural roads, some in the weeds, some half-submerged in canals. For a few spots, crime scene tape has been replaced by stark memorials.

    Private investigator Kirk Menard knows every final resting place, along with the sordid circumstances attached to each one.

    'This all points to something very local,' Menard said. 'Someone right in the center of this if you go by geographical profiling. That's it's someone right in the center of this area, who knows this area.'

    Menard was hired by the families of several victims after local police came up empty trying to solve the cases.

    While law enforcement still pursues a theory that the murders the work of a single serial killer, Menard quickly dismisses that idea.

    'I think we have more than one killer here,' he said. 'All the victims knew each other. They all ran in the same circles. All of the same names keep popping up. I think there are multiple people involved.'

    In fact, different sets of suspects were arrested in two of the killings, but those cases quickly crumbled.

    Two local men were booked in the murder of Patterson, the second victim, but the charges were dropped due to lack of evidence.

    And two different people, a local man and his niece, were taken into custody in the killing of Kristen Lopez, the third victim. That case fell apart when the lone witness recanted her story.

    'Sometimes I wonder, 'Are they any further along than what they were the first day they started?''

    FEAR AND CORRUPTION

    The murder statistics of this rural stretch of Acadiana are sobering. The eight killings, along with nine other unsolved murders in the area since the first body was discovered, give Jefferson Davis Parish one of the lowest clearance rates for homicide in the country. According to the FBI, the parish has a clearance rate of less than seven percent, compared to a national clearance rate of 64 percent.

    The prospect that killers might be living among them, melting back into the mundane rhythms of everyday life, keeps many residents on edge.

    'It is a very high murder rate in a very short time,' Menard said. 'That's definitely another cause for concern. Are we safe in this town?'

    Even more unsettling to people in Jennings is the idea that somehow police are tangled up in the eight killings. The notion is widely shared, and there is a disturbing pattern of police misconduct that raises uncomfortable questions.

    Just last year, former Jennings Police Chief Johnny Lassiter, who served during the time period of the killings, pled guilty to stealing money and drugs from the evidence room. Lassiter, who is awaiting sentencing, could not be reached for comment.

    A few years before that, Jefferson Davis Deputy Paula Guillory was fired after being accused of the same thing.

    In fact, a 109-page report by a multi-agency task force created in 2008 to solve the killings contains dozens of interviews in which witnesses suggest police involvement.

    The document, obtained by WWL-TV, has been heavily researched by author and private investigator Ethan Brown.

    'They're getting tons of information about specific cops and deputies and their involvement in these homicides,' Brown said. 'Misconduct has really marred this case really from the get-go on the part of law enforcement.'

    Brown, who uses his investigative skills as a true crime writer, has delved deep into the murders and just published a lengthy article about the case on the newly launched website Medium.com. In his opinion, police misconduct directly torpedoed chances for a break in the case.

    Take Guillory, the fired deputy. When she was dismissed for mishandling evidence, she was a detective and key member of the multi-agency task force put together to solve the murders.

    The missing evidence? It came from a drug case against a man who would turn out to be and still is a lead suspect in the killings.

    Guillory did not return calls for comment.

    Perhaps the most glaring missed opportunity to get a break in the cases can be found in a 2007 ethics violation by Jeff Davis deputy Warren Gary, the department's chief criminal investigator at the time.

    Gary was fined $10,000 for buying a truck from a parish inmate, then immediately selling it for a handsome profit.

    The disappearance of the truck would prove to be a major blow. In a case with almost no physical evidence, two witnesses told deputies that a recent passenger in the truck was Lopez, the third victim.

    The truck reportedly was used to carry Lopez's body to a canal on the edge of a rice field, where her badly beaten body was found.

    At the time, the sheriff's office said the purchase and quick sale of the truck was unfortunate, but not intended to thwart the Lopez investigation.

    But two witnesses, cited in interviews, told a detective precisely why it was critical to keep the truck as evidence.

    'Two witnesses came forward to speak to a detective, then with the Jennings P.D., named Jessie Ewing, and said that the chief investigator at the sheriff's office purchased this vehicle in order to dispose of the physical evidence in the case,' Brown said.

    So, what happened to Gary, the criminal investigator, after the ethics fine? Instead of being demoted or disciplined, Gary was promoted to commander of the evidence room. Gary finally left the department in 2012 when Sheriff Ivy Woods was elected to take over from then-Sheriff Ricky Edwards.

    Contact information for Gary was unavailable.

    Like Edwards before him, Woods downplays the police misconduct as unfortunate but unrelated transgressions. But Brown and others see common threads that are too damaging to the murder to be coincidental.

     
  2. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    'How does the misconduct play out? The way it plays out is it benefits the prime suspect in at least two of the homicides, Frankie Richard,' Brown said.

    A SUSPECT SPEAKS

    Frankie Richard, 58, still lives in the center of the south side of Jennings, beaten down by a life of cocaine addiction and frequent trips to the local jail. Now toothless and in failing health, he describes himself as 'down on my luck.'

    But some would call Richard very lucky. He's been named as a suspect in two of the Jennings murders and held in custody for 89 days in one of them but neither case stuck. His criminal history shows a string of convictions for petty crimes like drug possession, theft and battery.

    Aside from being a murder suspect, Richard's arrest history includes major offenses such as aggravated rape, aggravated assault, arson and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. While he's been in and out of prison, including time for violating probation, none of the major felonies has resulted in lengthy stretches behind bars.

    Richard, who lives in a small house with his extended family, admits that his road through life has been rough. He said he spent most of his working years as the owner of a string of strip joints in and around Jennings. He also said he worked on an offshore oil rig, where he suffered a back injury that qualified him for federal disability payments.

    As for his darker days of drug abuse and exploitation of women, Richard is candid up to a point. Here's an exchange from a recent interview:

    Reporter: 'Let's start with what we know. You had a history of owning strip clubs?'

    Richard: 'Correct.'

    Reporter: 'And using drugs.'

    Richard: 'Right.'

    Reporter: 'Including hard drugs?'

    Richard: 'Correct.'

    Reporter: 'Cocaine?'

    Richard: 'Cocaine.'

    Reporter: 'Crack cocaine?'

    Richard: 'Crack cocaine.'

    Reporter: 'How much crack cocaine?'

    Richard: 'A whole lot.'


    'I done my dirt,' he said. 'Whether it's my drugs, or whether I was involved in a little, some prostitution. I hooked my friends with some of these girls that I knew. And what they done, they done.'

    On the subject of the murders, however, Richard flat-out denies being involved. What he does admit, however, is eye-opening.

    He admits that he knew all of the victims, some intimately. He admits trading drugs for sex with some of them, although he doesn't name names.

    'I have gotten high with most of them, OK, most of the girls,' he said. 'Had sex with a couple of them.'

    According to witness interviews in the task force report, Richard has been linked to several of the killings. But he was only arrested in connection with one, the case of Lopez.

    Richard was taken into custody along with his niece Hannah Connor, who was booked as an accessory in the killing. A witness came forward and named the two as the killers, but the case was shaky without corroborating evidence.

    One piece of evidence that could have strengthened the case was the truck bought and sold by Gary, the chief investigator.

    Richard admits he was one of the last people to see Lopez alive, throwing her out of a motel where they were getting high together.

    He said he kicked her out because she was stealing from him.

    He says that's the last time he saw her, and it haunts him.

    'The next day, or that night, she went missing,' Richard said. 'Now I've got to live with that. If I'd have let that girl go back to my motel room, she might still be alive. And that bothers me. It bothers me a lot.'

    Richard also admits being one of the last people to see the next victim, Dubois. Some witnesses in the task force report say Richard was involved in Dubois' murder. But detectives never mustered enough evidence to arrest him.

    Reporter: 'If you were law enforcement, wouldn't you come to you with questions?'

    Richard: 'Of course. Yes, I would come with questions.'

    Reporter: 'Maybe suspicions about your involvement?'

    Richard: 'Yeah, they could have suspected me.'

    Yet, Richard adamantly denies playing any role in the victims' murders. He also forcefully denies an aggravated rape charge that was dropped at the same time the Lopez murder case fell apart.

    Richard said he has taken at least three lie detector tests, although he admits the results came out inconclusive.

    'They tried to railroad me,' Richard said. 'I didn't have anything to do with any of the killings. I never hurt any of them girls in any kind of way.'

    In fact, Richard said he has gone to task force detective with information about other possible suspects, including law enforcement officers and others who he says have been protected by the cops.

    'There were these rumors going around about the cops killing these girls, so I told them what I knew,' Richard said. 'I believe that if it wasn't a cop that done it, there's a cop that knows who done it.'

    Living under the dark shadow of being named a suspected killer has taken its toll, Richard said. His children have been threatened and several times, he believes, he has been the target of retribution.

    'Three different times somebody tried to kill me in the middle of the night while I was walking down the street,' he said. 'But I don't care about myself. What scares me the most out of all of this is somebody actually believes that I had something to do with one of these girls' murders, and take it out on my kids to get back at me.'

    On top of clearing his name, Richard admits there's another motive for him to help police solve the cases. If he had answers, he said he wouldn't hesitate to put in for the $85,000 being offered in reward money.

    SEARCHING FOR ANSWERS

    Detectives assigned the task force continue to work to solve the murders of the Jennings 8. They say Richard has not been eliminated as a suspect, although there is no physical evidence linking him to any of the killings.

    Even though the trail has grown cold, task force members said they still field tips. Sometimes new information comes in several times a week. Sometimes the phones remain quiet for a month or more.

    But the task force, which is primarily run by the Jefferson Davis Sheriff's Office and Jennings Police Department, with support from the Louisiana State Police and the FBI, remains determined to get answers.

    'We handle every tip like it's a fresh tip,' said Sheriff Woods. 'We're going to try to put fresh eyes on the investigation. And we've been doing that for a year and half.'

    The task force is overseen by Woods, elected in 2012, partially on a campaign promise to revive the murder investigations.

    To help jump-start the efforts of the task force, Woods said he has brought in new detectives to take a fresh look at old evidence. And he said he has tried to coax new evidence by posting reminders around the parish in the form of posters, fliers and billboards. Some of the posters repeat the $85,000 reward.

    'We're letting them know that we were going to continue the investigations on these eight murders,' Woods said. 'We couldn't solve it in the first week, or the first month, maybe not even in the first five year. Maybe not in my whole term, but we are continuing investigations.'
     
  3. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    Perhaps most importantly, Woods said, he is trying to reverse suspicions in the community that law enforcement had a hand in the killings. But he admits that the wariness still exists.

    'The rumor has gotten out several times within this investigation that it has to be a law enforcement official that committed these murders because they can't be caught,' Woods said.

    Woods concedes that it's not just the failure to solve the cases that fuel community mistrust. The sale of the truck by the former chief investigator a truck that could have provided critical DNA evidence was truly damaging, he concedes.

    'That's one of those awkward points within the previous department, the sheriff's department, that happened,' he said. 'That's one thing I can't say much about because I'm not aware of it, what all happened. And then that's where the distrust started.'

    Despite the many setbacks, Woods believes the cases can be solved.

    'You realize how close they've got to solving it, and then they've had to, like I said, fall backwards within the investigation because their numbers are in a row, but all of sudden, one number falls out and you have to start all over again,' he said.

    Detective Chris Ivey, a new task force member brought in by Woods, said patience is critical.

    'You can't get flustered. You do, but you can't let it affect you because they're not going to go away,' Ivey said.

    Woods believe that fear is the biggest obstacle to getting a break in the case.

    'What size reward will make a person come out and say it in fear of their life? That's our biggest problem,' Woods said.

    Menard, the private investigator, also believes the answers are out there somewhere, tucked away in some witness's memory, perhaps being muffled by fear, intimidation, distrust of law enforcement or a mixture of all three.

    Yet since he's been on the case, he has come as close as anyone in pinpointing the patterns in the killings. In one instance, shockingly close.

    Working undercover, Menard discovered the drug hangouts, coaxed new information from reluctant witnesses and found evidence police overlooked.

    But his most alarming contribution was a video he shot in June 2009. On the street where some of the other victims engaged in their risky behavior, he filmed 26-year-old Necole Guillory, walking alone, combing her long hair.

    Two months later, she became victim No. 8.

    'I went and parked. Turned on my camera. Started videotaping. Got her walking up and down the street. A little over two months later she became a victim,' Menard said.

    'It was very unsettling that the girl that I videotaped later became a victim.'

    Even though fresh tips are infrequent these days, Guillory and the other victims aren't far from Menard's thoughts. And along with those thoughts is the nagging notion that there is a key out there to unlock these tragic mysteries.

    'The answers are here in this town,' he said. 'Somebody has those answers. Somebody knows who's responsible for each and every one of these murders, but they're scared to come forward.'

    Anyone with information can call the task force at 1-337-824-6662. Callers may remain anonymous.

    http://www.wwltv.com/story/news/2014/09/04/14666086/
     
  4. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    4. The Long Island Killer. 10 or more victims

    gilgo_search.jpg

    It was a bitterly cold afternoon four years ago when a Suffolk County cop’s German shepherd sniffed out the skeletal corpse of Melissa Barthelemy, 24, a Bronx prostitute who had vanished a year and a half earlier.

    The cop had been looking for a different woman, but the dog’s discovery of Barthelemy’s body in a crumbling burlap sack amid the thorny underbrush off Ocean Parkway in Gilgo Beach, Long Island, exposed something unexpected.

    It was the sickening work of one of New York’s most prolific serial killers ever — with a body count of at least 10 victims and as many as 1
    7.

    mainmap.jpg

    Dubbed the Gilgo Beach Killer, he’s been stalking and slaughtering his prey for two decades, some believe, with a methodical efficiency that has detectives no closer to catching him today than they were on that frigid day of Dec. 11, 2010.

    The search for the elusive predator has, in fact, stalled, according to a police source.

    Detectives have not advanced the case in recent months and are in need of a tip from the public or lucky break, says the source, who has access to information about the probe.

    “It’s been four years, and they’ve not got too much to show for it,” said the State Police officer, who is not involved in the investigation but is familiar with the work of those who are.

    Suffolk County cops will say nothing. They’ve refused to speak with the media and won’t tell families of victims what they’re doing or if any progress has been made.

    The department is “not commenting further at this time on the Gilgo investigation until or unless we have some additional information pertaining to the investigation that serves the investigation or the public by its release,” a spokesman said.

    Being left in the dark has infuriated some of the families.

    “All they say is that when they find the killer, I’ll be the first to know,” said Marie Ducharme, the mother of victim Maureen Brainard-Barnes. “They’re lying. They’re saying that just to keep me satisfied.”

    Ducharme slammed police for how they’ve conducted their probe, which has been plagued by unfounded rumors, misinformation, public spats among officials and flip-flopping theories — with probers vacillating between there being one or two murderers. (It’s one, police say now.)

    “If they had [done a good job], they would have found the killer already,” she said.
     
  5. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    The Gilgo Girls
    Within days of unearthing Barthelemy’s remains, police found the bodies of three more young call girls who booked appointments on Craigslist and went missing between 2007 and 2010: Brainard-Barnes, 25; Megan Waterman, 22; and Amber Lynn Costello, 27.

    Each had been strangled elsewhere, wedged into burlap and dumped amid thick scrub just off the sand-swept causeway on the inlet side of Gilgo in the town of Babylon.

    Six more bodies, or parts of bodies, were discovered over the next year in different areas of Suffolk and Nassau counties. Some victims had been hacked up, their limbs scattered across remote sections of Gilgo, Oak Beach and elsewhere.

    Among them was a young Asian man dressed as a woman killed by a blow to the head and a female sex worker and her toddler child, who was found wrapped in a blanket. Both mother and daughter had on inexpensive jewelry. Officials displayed the girl’s earrings and necklace in the hope that someone might recognize the items.

    They also put out artist sketches of the two unknown adults, which generated tips but failed to solve the mystery of their identities. Of the 10 bodies, just five have been identified — the original four plus Jessica Taylor, 20, a prostitute whose skull, hands and forearm were recovered in May 2011 near Gilgo. She’d been dead for many years; police recovered her torso in Manorville in 2003.

    Seven more possible victims have since been considered.

    They include “Peaches,” a black woman whose tattooed torso, featuring a heart-shaped peach on her left breast, turned up in a Rubbermaid container in 1997 in Hempstead Lake State Park; “Cherries,” another female with a tattoo — of two cherries, also on her left breast — who’d been stabbed and washed up on a beach in Mamaronek in 2007; and two Long Island prostitutes, one identified as Tanya Rush, 39, a Brooklyn mom whose hacked-up body was found in 2008 in a small suitcase off the Southern State Parkway in Bellmore.

    Cops are studying two more bodies, each found in 2013: the remains of an Asian woman in Lattingtown, near Oyster Bay, who had on a necklace with a 22-karat gold pendant of a pig, and Natasha Jugo, 31, a Yugoslavian-American woman from Queens whose body washed up onto Gilgo Beach on June 24, 2013.

    The group also includes Shannan Gilbert, the call girl whose disappearance in May 2010 prompted the search that led police to Barthelemy.

    Gilbert had fled the home of a wealthy client in Oak Beach, Joseph Brewer, in what appeared to be a drug-induced panic, then made a cellphone call in which she claimed, “They’re trying to kill me.”

    At one point she pleaded with a neighbor for assistance. Police say she ran off again and died accidentally, possibly by drowning in a marsh, and was not a victim of foul play.

    Her badly decomposed body was found in December 2011 not far from where she was last seen.

    Her mother, Mari Gilbert, insists Shannan was killed — and sued a doctor, Peter Hackett, who saw her that night and allegedly did nothing to help. The suit says Hackett, whose home Gilbert ran to on the night of her death, gave her drugs and sent her off. Much of her complaint has been tossed out on a technicality involving statutes of limitations.

    Mari also sued the Suffolk County PD and enlisted the assistance of renowned medical examiner Michael Baden to review her daughter’s autopsy and have her case reclassified as a homicide. Baden is at work on the matter now.

    http://nypost.com/2015/01/03/4-years-17-victims-later-police-cant-catch-the-gilgo-beach-killer/
     
  6. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    3. West Mesa Murders. 12 victims

    The story of the West Mesa murders begins outside Albuquerque, New Mexico, on a high desert plateau that rises up over the Rio Grande. Sun Belt sprawl and subdivisions with names like Desert Spring Flower and Paradise Hills give way to dry sand, tumbleweeds, and trailer parks. It’s desolate on this part of the West Mesa. There’s a municipal shooting range, a speedway, the Bernalillo County Metropolitan Detention Center. There’s also a crime scene where, in 2009, 11 decomposed corpses were found buried in shallow graves.

    It took the Albuquerque police weeks to uncover all the bodies—which were scattered over a 92-acre swath of land owned by a home developer—and nearly a year to identify the victims. All of them were women between the ages of 15 and 32, and most were Hispanic. The women had gone missing between 2001 and 2005—long before the bodies were uncovered. Ten of the 11 victims were known prostitutes and drug users, a fact that police pointed out early and often. One victim, 22-year-old Michelle Valdez, had been four months pregnant. The 11th woman, 15-year-old Jamie Barela, had disappeared in 2004. She had gone to the park with her cousin, Barela’s mother told reporters, leaving the house with her curling iron still on. Her body was the last to be identified. Her cousin, 27-year-old Evelyn Salazar, had been identified two months prior. A second 15-year-old, Syllania Edwards, a runaway from Lawton, Oklahoma, was the only African American victim and the only one with ties outside New Mexico.

    It was the most horrific murder case Albuquerque had ever seen. While serial killers are not uncommon in the Western United States, New Mexico’s largest city had never dealt with one before. Police promised the families of the victims that solving the murders was a top priority, and initially that seemed to be the case. Investigators assembled a crack team of detectives, bringing in FBI profilers and working with law enforcement agencies around the state to try to figure out how the bones of 11 women had wound up in the desert. Now it’s more than five years after the first body was discovered. Police still have no official suspects, and Albuquerque has largely forgotten about what was once known as the city’s “crime of the century.”

    “There hasn’t been the degree of public fear and alarm that you might expect. There has been very little publicity,” said Dirk Gibson, a professor at the University of New Mexico who has written two books on serial killers. “There’s a sense of physical remoteness—this place was very removed. A combination of remoteness of time and geography made it so that there has been little pressure on the police to investigate.”

    victims-rows.jpg

    To be fair, there wasn’t much for the cops to go on. Officially, the cause of death for all 11 women was “homicidal violence,” but the truth was, medical examiners and forensic experts couldn’t determine how the victims had been killed. No witnesses have come forward, and there was virtually no forensic evidence at the burial site, which meant that there was nothing to tie the victims together except their shared grave and “high-risk lifestyles.”

    There were leads, of course. First there were the photos, released by the Albuquerque Police Department at the end of 2010, of seven women who cops believed could be linked to the West Mesa murders. Two of the women were later discovered to be alive, and one had apparently died of natural causes. Police have never said where the photos originated, or whether anything has come of the tip. Then there was Ron Erwin, a photographer from Joplin, Missouri, and a frequent visitor of the New Mexico State Fair, which is held near the burial site. But after confiscating hundreds of photos and documents from his home and businesses, police couldn’t tie him to the murders. (Erwin, rather obviously, later told a local newspaper that he was devastated by the serial-killer suspicions.) Later that year, George Walker, a private investigator, started receiving cryptic, taunting phone calls and emails from someone claiming to have information about the killer, but the lead still hasn’t panned out. Over the years, other names have popped up in the investigation—mostly local pimps and serial wife beaters, some dead or in jail—but nothing has stuck.

    “There’s a possibility the killer has come and gone. Serial killers move; that’s why they don’t get caught,” Walker said. “If he didn’t get caught, I’m sure there are more victims somewhere. He could possibly be on the loose in New Mexico or another state.”



    The investigation revealed the dark side of Albuquerque, a sleepy Southwestern city of half a million people, where the rate of violent crime is more than double the national average and where women of questionable morals can vanish into thin air without anyone giving a shit. In 2007, two years before the crime was uncovered, an Albuquerque reporter discovered that the city’s lone missing-persons detective had compiled names of 16 prostitutes who had disappeared in the city between 2001 and 2006—the first sign of a serial killer. But to the police, it seemed, it was nothing but a list of missing hookers. Eventually, nine of those women were identified at the West Mesa boneyard. The whereabouts of the other seven remain unknown, leaving open the question of whether the killer might have had other burial sites—and whether he may still be out there, killing. “It’s logical that there may be more than one grave site,” said Gibson. “Albuquerque is filled with tons of these types of sites. If police discovered this one, which clearly had been discontinued, maybe there’s another one. I wouldn’t be at all surprised.”

    As shocking as the West Mesa serial killings are, they are also not unique. While the number of serial killings in the US has declined in recent decades, those that do occur disproportionately target women. According to FBI data released in 2011, 70 percent of serial-killer victims since 1985 have been women, mostly in their 20s or 30s. “The majority of victims of serial killers are what I call the less dead—as far as the public is concerned, they are less alive because they tend to be the marginalized groups in society—in this case drug addicts and prostitutes,” said Steven Egger, who teaches criminology at the University of Houston–Clear Lake, in Texas, and has consulted for the FBI. “There’s an attitude that permeates the press and the public that reduces pressure on police to solve the crime, at least initially, until you’ve got a number of victims.”

    Police in Albuquerque say that they are still investigating the West Mesa serial killings, known officially as the 118th Street Homicides. Detectives have given few details about the status of the investigation in recent years, and a spokeswoman for the police department declined to comment for this story. The Albuquerque cops have also had their own internal problems to deal with: In late July, the city announced that the Department of Justice would monitor the Albuquerque Police Department, after a civil investigation found that a pattern of excessive use of force, including deadly force, by officers resulted in 20 fatalities between 2009 and 2012, and concluded that the majority of these shootings were unconstitutional. Albuquerque and New Mexico law enforcement officials have also been racked by sex scandals in recent years, including accusations that a state police officer and an Albuquerque police officer sexually assaulted prostitutes.

    In the absence of any official details or updates, though, everyone has his own theory about the West Mesa bone collector, ranging from dirty cops to drug gangs. Regardless of the answer, it seems that both the killer—or killers—and Albuquerque have moved on. “Albuquerqueans don’t relate to the victims; they think they’re just a bunch of hookers and drug addicts,” Gibson said. “Police budgets are stretched thin. There’s so little money, and there are so many crimes. Investigating a ten-year-old crime where the police think that the victims had it coming—there’s just no incentive for that.”

    memorial.jpg

    http://www.vice.com/read/who-is-the-west-mesa-bone-collector-0000439-v21n9
     
  7. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    2. Smiley Face Killer 200+ victims

    these-5-serial-killers-have-never-been-caught-and-they-could-be-in-a-town-near-you-smile-391779.jpg

    Due to the sheer amount of victims, many are skeptical that the Smiley face killer exists, and think of it as an urban legend.

    But, the horrifying truth is that young men from all over the USA have all died in the same circumstances. Leading some experts to believe there isn't just one killer, but a gang of killers all working together to commit murder.

    Two retired police officers wouldn't believe that over 200 young men, none of which were known to be suicidal, all popular, enjoyed sports, good at school, could all just die by accidental drowning.

    They believe they can link at least 40 drownings in 25 cities in 10 separate states in America.

    Further investigation has now proved that many of the scenes could be linked, by a drawing of a small smiley face left somewhere near where some of the young men's bodies were found.

    these-5-serial-killers-have-never-been-caught-and-they-could-be-in-a-town-near-you-391798.jpg

    The killers also left clues as to where next victims could be found. The word 'Sinsinawa' was found written on a wall near to where one mans body had been washed up. Weeks later, another unfortunate young man's body was found, hundreds of miles away. The police believed the young man had been out into the water at Sinsinawa Ave.

    these-5-serial-killers-have-never-been-caught-and-they-could-be-in-a-town-near-you-poten-391810.jpg

    So why has the killer been leaving these subtle clues? And will the police ever catch up to the killer, or killers? Drowning makes it almost impossible as evidence gets washed away, and the body moves away from the area it entered the water, also meaning evidence gets lost. So it remains a mystery.

    A mystery that has claimed the lives of over 200 young men so far.



    http://www.cnn.com/2008/CRIME/05/21/smiley.face.killer/
     
  8. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    1. Highway Serial Killer 450+ victims

    these-5-serial-killers-have-never-been-caught-and-they-could-be-in-a-town-near-you-map-o-391830.jpg

    Each red dot on the picture is sadly a victim of 'The Highway Serial Killer', and the numbers are growing. The FBI has stated that this isn't just one killer, but a network of killers who use the highways to murder and run.

    The profile of the murderers tends to be truck drivers, or people who need to use the highway frequently due to their job. This means they don't stay in one place for too long. Which makes the killers harder to track.

    Most of the victims have high risk lifestyles, such as prostitution and drug use, which means they are less likely to have a fixed place to live, making it harder for people to realize they are missing. They also move around a lot, and with less stability, sadly, it is easier for someone to fall of the radar more easily.

    One highway in-particular gained notoriety for the amount of victims, and was named the 'highway of tears.'

    these-5-serial-killers-have-never-been-caught-and-they-could-be-in-a-town-near-you-391845.jpg

    A 500 mile stretch of road along Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, British Columbia, Canada has been the place where 16 women have been murdered between 1969-2006, and that's only counting the victims that were found. Up to 43 families have claimed they have lost a family member along that strip of road.

    Police have suspects, but are doubtful they will ever be able to convict the killers of each of the women.

    these-5-serial-killers-have-never-been-caught-and-they-could-be-in-a-town-near-you-victi-391860.jpg

    Police and local people strongly suggest not to hitch-hike, you can never be sure who's car you might be getting into.

    And if you live in any of these towns or cities, or even if you don't, always remember to take extra precautions to keep yourself safe, always let a person you trust know where you are at all times. NEVER walk in dimly lit areas and carry a mobile phone to ring the police if you find yourself in an emergency situation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highway_of_Tears_murders
     
  9. DinnerSocks

    DinnerSocks Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    39,190
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2014
    Messages:
    5,384
    Likes Received:
    12,571
    Great thread Dawg! Have you ever listened to former Bubba Producer Brent Hadley's show "Hunting the Beast"? He profiled many famous serial killers. It was great. Here's another one...

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Shady_Jake

    Shady_Jake Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    767
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2015
    Messages:
    766
    Likes Received:
    1,740
    Great stuff! I could read true crime all day.
     
    deadbeat, Penelope, youknew and 2 others like this.
  11. agnes

    agnes Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    34,849
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Messages:
    3,017
    Likes Received:
    6,852
    Zodiac is number one. The highway thing isn't one guy doing all that, probably just separate truckers picking up whores.

    Never bought the smiley face one. Not really any evidence that's not just drunk kids drowning
     
  12. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    We should keep adding serial killers to this thread, there are many many cases.
     
  13. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    The Alphabet Murders

    In the early 1970s, a series of brutal killings shook the area around Rochester, New York. The victims were all young girls—but that wasn’t all they had in common. Carmen Colon, Wanda Walkowicz, and Michelle Maenza also happened to have alliterative initials, leading the press to initially refer to the incidents as the “Double Initial Killings,” later revising this to the much punchier “Alphabet Murders.”

    Many people were questioned in relation to these crimes, and one suspect who killed himself shortly after the final murder was for a long time thought to be the most likely culprit—that is, until he was posthumously cleared in 2007 by DNA testing.

    Likewise, an uncle of one of the victims was thought to be a prime suspect; he was never charged, and was subsequently cleared when DNA testing became available. Rochester native Kenneth Bianchi has long been under suspicion, too. After moving to Los Angeles, he and his cousin committed the murders attributed to the “Hillside Strangler”—and while Bianchi has never officially been cleared of the Rochester killings, he has also never been charged, and still maintains his innocence.

    Additionally, in 2011, seventy-seven-year-old New Yorker Joseph Naso was charged with murdering four women in California in the late 1970s. He probably wouldn’t have been considered in relation to the Rochester case, but for the names of his victims: Roxene Roggash, Pamela Parsons, Tracy Tofoya and—incredibly—another Carmen Colon. But at the time of writing, Naso’s trial has been repeatedly postponed in the California cases; nor has he been charged with the Rochester Alphabet Murders.
     
  14. agnes

    agnes Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    34,849
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Messages:
    3,017
    Likes Received:
    6,852
    Most interesting part to me is that they just stop and get away with it. Wonder what makes them decide to stop
     
    Scarlett Ohara and reno like this.
  15. Freedom Fries

    Freedom Fries Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    4,169
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2013
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    1,072


    Watched a program called E Channel Investigates about this guy, it was creepy as hell.
     
    alittlebitcunty likes this.
  16. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    I-70 Serial Killer

    kitzmiller.png

    RAYTOWN, Mo. — Twenty years after a multi-state killing spree, police release new information about the “I-70” killer in an effort to solve the case.

    Police said one man is responsible for shooting killing six people in five Midwestern cities in April and May of 1992. Four of the crimes were committed at strip malls along I-70 — two in Missouri and two in Indiana. Two other crimes were committed at a bridal shop near I-35 in Wichita, Kan.

    According to St. Louis Today, St. Charles, Mo., police shared unreleased information about the gun used in all six shootings. Lt. David Senter said the weapon was a .22-caliber gun, possibly an Intratec Scorpion or Erma Werke Model ET 22. The ammunition was CCI brand .22-caliber long rifle with copper-clad lead bullets.

    Police described the suspect as a white male in his mid-20s to mid-30s, but more likely in his mid-30s, which would make him in his mid-50s today if still alive. One of the better descriptions of the suspect came from an eye-witness in Raytown, Mo. A video store owner in a strip mall where one of the shootings happened saw a man enter a neighboring gift shop then heard a pop. A grocery store clerk saw a man climb a hill to I-70 and disappear. The video store owner found the body of 37-year-old Sarah Blessing inside the gift shop.

    Prior to her murder, police said the same man is suspected of killing Robin Fuldauer, 26, at a Payless shoe store in Indianapolis; Patricia Magers, 32, and Patricia Smith, 23, at La Bridal shop in Wichita; Michael McCown, 40, at Sylvia’s Ceramics in Terra Haute, Ind., and Nancy Kitzmiller, 24, at Boot Village in St. Charles, Mo.

    Police believe the same man could be responsible for three other crimes in Texas in 1993 and 1994. Two of the three victims died.
     
  17. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    Original Night Stalker

    original-night-stalker-all-people-photo-u1.jpg original-night-stalker-all-people-photo-u3.jpg original-night-stalker-all-people-photo-u2.jpg

    Although Richard Ramirez made a name for himself as the Night Stalker, the nickname was originally given to the Original Night Stalker, a killer who murdered and raped at least 13 people from 1976 to 1986. Over 50 victims were raped by the same killer. Nobody was ever arrested for the crimes.
     
  18. JesusTwinsBiggestFan

    JesusTwinsBiggestFan Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    21,886
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2015
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    4,337
  19. dawg

    dawg In The Dog House Staff Member

    Reputations:
    540,035
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Messages:
    119,421
    Likes Received:
    90,632
    The long island serial killer has been getting away with it since 1996. Mind boggling.
     
  20. JameGumb

    JameGumb We're all out of toner!

    Reputations:
    227,197
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2013
    Messages:
    35,348
    Likes Received:
    26,744
    450 + Deaths, connection of multiple killers? That shit makes Texas Chainsaw/Devils Rejects shit seem like nothing :wtf:
     
    ScottBaiosPenis likes this.