Today is the anniversary of the CHALLENGER shuttle disaster..............

Discussion in 'The Bar' started by darthnilus, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. darthnilus

    darthnilus New Member

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    I was in 5th grade. I grew up in New Hampshire so the teacher in space was a big deal around there. We watched it launch in class, then the teachers hurried us back to class when it blew up....it was weird.

    Do you remeber..where you were, how old etc..?
     
  2. stripes

    stripes Active Member Banned User

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    the actual crew cabin remained intact until it hit the water.
    they recovered body parts on the ocean floor & put them in barrels on the recovery ship.
    it has been suggested they were alive up until the water impact.
     
  3. stripes

    stripes Active Member Banned User

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    On March 8, 1986, a search team found the crew cabin; it had not been destroyed in the explosion. The bodies of all seven crew members were found, still strapped into their seats. Autopsies were done but exact cause of death was inconclusive. It is believed that at least some of the crew survived the explosion, since three of four emergency air packs found had been deployed. After the explosion, the crew cabin fell over 50,000 feet and hit the water at approximately 200 miles per hour. None could have survived the impact.
     
  4. Vashier

    Vashier VIP Extreme Gold

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    I was in Catv repair driving to a house in north Brockton, I grabbed my test TV and a box after hearing about it on the radio. The customer and I sat and watched it on my set for a good 1/2 hour before I got to his problem.
     
  5. stripes

    stripes Active Member Banned User

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    Recovery of the heroes was a long, difficult ordeal for all involved. The bulkhead that secured the internal air pressure of the crew decks, separate from the airlock to the cargo bay, faced the divers as a dangerous skew of wreckage that had to be removed before they could reach what remained of the bodies inside.
    First to be retrieved from the watery tomb were the remains of Judy Resnik. The divers worked slowly but steadily. More and more parts of bodies went to the surface. Then, from the middeck, the remains of First-Teacher-in-Space Christa McAuliffe were carried slowly to the surface vessel. For the moment, that was all the divers could do.
    The cabin wreckage was so twisted and tangled, sharp edges jutting everywhere like knife points, that the divers demanded the wreckage itself be hauled to the surface and the operation continued on deck.
    The crew, the NASA teams and the astronauts overseeing the operation stood silently on the USS Preserver recovery ship as a crane lifted the wreckage from the sea. Every step possible to render respect and honor to the human remains was taken.
    The salvage operations proceeded normally until the steel cables on the ocean bottom tugged at another section of Challenger’s middeck. At first the weight and mass seemed too great for the hoisting system. Slowly, painfully, the cables pulled the unseen wreckage from the bottom. Then the cables drew the load to the surface. Divers in the water, and everyone on deck, froze where they were.
    A blue astronaut jumpsuit bobbed to the surface, turned slowly and then disappeared again within the sea.

    What seemed liked minutes passed, in reality only seconds of time. Divers and sailors stood stunned as they realized what had happened. They had found — and just as quickly lost — astronaut Gregory Jarvis. Immediately the divers went deep again, beginning a frantic search for the last astronaut of Challenger, a frustrating search that would not end for another five weeks.
    Reuniting the heroes
    In the days following, armed forces pathologists made positive identifications of six astronauts from Challenger. The underwater search continued for the body of Gregory Jarvis.
    The frustrations of failure day after day began to tell on everyone involved. No one wanted to declare “missing” someone so close to his own group, when they knew the body had every chance of being nearby.
    Veteran shuttle pilots Robert Crippen and Bob Overmyer had been put in charge of the recovery of their fellow astronauts, and they would brook no interference from anyone, no matter how high they might be in the NASA hierarchy. Or from any other source. Crippen and Overmyer had decided that when the remains were turned over to the families, there would be seven coffins beneath the American flags. There would not be six. So desperate was Crippen to bring Jarvis home with the rest of his crew that he used his own creditcard to hire a local scallop boat to drag its nets across the ocean bottom. Crippen’s move was a last-ditch effort in a search all but abandoned by the exhausted recovery forces.
    On April 15, when the recovery teams were planning to cease the search they had carried out for months, divers were making what was scheduled to be their last attempts to gather wreckage from the ocean floor. Two hundred yards from where they had lost the blue suit, they swam within view of the lost astronaut.
    The seventh crew member of Challenger was brought carefully to the surface. Ashore, finally, the Challenger Seven were reunited.
    Next: Finding fault
    NBC News correspondent Jay Barbree has covered America’s space effort from Cape Canaveral for more than 40 years. This is an updated version of a series that was first published on MSNBC.com in January 1997.
     
  6. whatsit

    whatsit Dawg Lover VIP

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    Horrible Day. I cried.
     
  7. whatsit

    whatsit Dawg Lover VIP

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    I felt pissed they let that teacher go. I know why but it seemed irresponsible. Her poor kids.
     
  8. HeinousMark

    HeinousMark Creepy-Ass Cracka VIP

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    I know what you mean, but it was just an unfortunate launch that she was on. I would imagine that especially for us average folks, the chance to go into space would be just about the most intense experience possible...
     
  9. fenderbaum

    fenderbaum Active Member

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    I was home from college at the time, and by then it had become pretty common place to send up a shuttle. The only reason for the fanfare with the Challenger was due to Christa McAullife, I happened to turn the TV on just prior to the launch (what a coincidence) and was amazed at what I saw, it was very sad indeed.

    Did you hear that recently there was some sort of study done showing how the crew compartment was ejected forward by the explosion, and that scientists surmise that the crew dies when they hit the water, and not from the blast? Also have you ever been to the Christa McAullife planetarium in Concord off route 9?
     
  10. fenderbaum

    fenderbaum Active Member

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    Oh, I love New Hampshire by the way.
     
  11. whatsit

    whatsit Dawg Lover VIP

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    Nothing would make me want to do that. It's very serious business. Test pilots are used to that kind of risk. Scientists ok. No civilians.
     
  12. DarkFriday

    DarkFriday Fired as a MOD...Twice. Gold

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    The year is 1987, and NASA launches the last of America's deep space probes. In a freak mishap, Ranger 3 and its pilot, Captain William "Buck" Rogers, are blown out of their trajectory into an orbit which freezes his life support systems, and returns Buck Rogers to Earth, 500 years later...
     
  13. fenderbaum

    fenderbaum Active Member

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    I believe that tragedies like this are monetarily influenced. NASA had the pressure of getting this launch off, as it was high profile, and was to propel the shuttle and space programs to a higher orbit in the public eye if you will. Since the mission was delayed due to weather several times I believe that they had to move and move quickly when they got the chance, even though some say that indicators of a failure loomed obvious. In the end someone with great authority chose to ignore the warnings as opposed to pulling the orbiter off the pad to see if indeed there was something wrong with the O rings, a financially motivated decision that in the end was dead wrong.

    Just think when an airplane crashes, take for example TWA flight 800, whereby they found the center fuel tank being empty and filled with volatile fumes caused the explosion when wiring sparked igniting the entire plane in a fireball. Upon conclusion the FAA suggested the retrofit of all 747 and aircrafts that utilize a central fuel ballast/transference tank to have an automatic purge system for the remaining gases, but due to the costs associated with such a repair vs. the cost associated with the loss of human life (yes there is a price on loss of life for these purposes) it was not done, rather airlines mandated that the crew would have to purge the tanks manually by transferring fuel through them at certain intervals in flight.
     
  14. SIPAWITZ

    SIPAWITZ Bialy Whore Banned User

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    i was onboard the USS Nimitz watching in our compartment lounge...ill never forget it.
     
  15. DarkFriday

    DarkFriday Fired as a MOD...Twice. Gold

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  16. DarkFriday

    DarkFriday Fired as a MOD...Twice. Gold

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    I was taking a mid term in my senior year high school American history class.

    True story. :coffee:
     
  17. darthnilus

    darthnilus New Member

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    Nice!! me too. Stayed at the mount washington hotel last month, I love it up there..
     
  18. darthnilus

    darthnilus New Member

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    I know the engineers at Thoikol tried for months to get someone to look at the o-rings, but it was only one or two of them, and they were over ruled and the launch went on.
    Sadly after this disaster, changes to the o-rings were made, and they started using three rings instead of 2.
     
  19. DogStar69

    DogStar69 Well-Known Member

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    It was Reagan's fault, he insisted on the launch, that's why God game him Oldtimers. (as the blaeks call it)
     
  20. fenderbaum

    fenderbaum Active Member

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    Nice, I have never stayed there, but would love to some day soon. Also love the Basin up the Franconia Notch Parkway.