Shop Now At Amazon

Vince Gilligan on writing Breaking Bad Finale

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by Kamie, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. Kamie

    Kamie Active Member

    Reputations:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,375
    Likes Received:
    1
    It's long, but worth the read for those Breaking Bad-o-philes that I know are on here.....

    Ten Things on Vince Gilligan’s Mind As He Writes the Final Episodes of Breaking Bad
    By Denise Martin - vulture

    “We’re not gonna please everyone, we’re not gonna please everyone … This is what I keep telling myself so I can sleep at night,” Vince Gilligan laughed last month, even though he wasn’t exactly joking. When he spoke to Vulture, he was putting the finishing touches on the story for the third to last episode, getting very close to tackling the series finale (the show’s last stretch of eight episodes airs on AMC starting in July). The writers room had gotten “a little schizophrenic,” said Gilligan: They’ve been taking twice as long as normal, or about three and a half weeks, to break each of these concluding episodes, and rather than building from the ground up, they’ve had to do a little reverse-engineering to arrive where they must by the end. All of which is to say, he’s more frazzled than usual, anxiously working to tie things up beautifully. “It’s going to be polarizing no matter how you slice it,” Gilligan said, “but you don’t want 10 percent to say it was great and 90 percent to say it sucked ass. You want those numbers to be reversed.” Without giving anything away (would anyone really want that?), he took some time to download ten things on his mind as he heads into the homestretch.
    1. The evolution of Walt’s fate. The metamorphosis of the sweet but sickly chemistry teacher into totally corrupted drug kingpin has made Walter White one of the most dynamic characters on TV, and just as he’s changed through the seasons, so too has Gilligan’s idea of how his saga would end. “I had this strange confidence in the beginning that I had an idea [for the ending] that was sound,” he said of Walt’s fate. “But I look back at the life of the series and realize I cycled through so many possible endings, it would be disingenuous to say I had always had it figured out. It has evolved in the last five years and probably has some evolving left to do.” He’s planted flags along the way to help steer the direction but still reserves the right to change course, even with two episodes left to go. “I read interviews with showrunners all the time who say, ‘I know exactly where this thing is headed.’ I always find that very interesting, and I don’t doubt them for a minute. It’s just I can’t see my way clear to do that because the characters in Breaking Bad are in a state of constant change by design,” he said. “When a character will be a different person five or six or ten or sixteen episodes from now, it’s hard to predict the future.”
    2. How Casablanca got it exactly right. In terms of nailing the end, Gilligan says he and the writers don’t talk about TV — they talk movies. And for him, Casablanca remains “pretty perfect.” “No one gets everything they wanted. The guy doesn’t get the girl, but he has the satisfaction of knowing she wants him. And he doesn’t get her because he has to save the free world. What better ending is there than that?” Gilligan said. “I’m not saying we’re going to approach that or reach in that direction. Our story doesn’t line up [with Casablanca]. But we’re looking for that kind of satisfaction.”
    3. His time on The X Files. Gilligan was still on the staff of The X Files when the sci-fi series reached its highly anticipated finale, but as a self-described “monster-of-the-week” guy, he says he never had to worry about making sure the conspiracies were synching. (He wrote the show’s penultimate episode “Sunshine Days,” set in The Brady Bunch house, and it had nothing to do with any of the overarching story lines.) “I sort of watched from afar as Chris Carter and Frank Spotnitz broke these mythology episodes, and they always made my head hurt like, Man, how do you link this and that? Then, of course, I wind up on this insanely hyperserialized show. I should have paid more attention back then.”
    4. Going back to the pilot. Ah, yes, Walt in his skivvies. The writers have spent a lot of time going back over that first episode, which began with Walt’s 50th-birthday party and the discovery that he had cancer, and ended with his partnership with small-time dealer Jesse Pinkman, concocting the sweetest meth and killing a pair of dealers after his recipe. “Are there echoes of the beginning that we should have in the end? There’s a certain kind of circularity that might be pleasing,” Gilligan said. “We think a lot about that, in fact.”
    5. Henry Mancini. Gilligan recently read an old interview with the composer in which he was asked about the type of music he liked. Mancini said he liked best the ones that built in a feeling of inevitability. “He said something like, and I’m paraphrasing here, ‘I think the best music compositions are the ones that surprise you in moments, but in others, you feel like you know where you’re going, and there’s this feeling of satisfaction that derives from that inevitability. In a sense, inevitability, realized,’” Gilligan said. “That really stuck with me because that’s what I think we do on this show. We try to have a surprise around every corner but inevitability as well. The opposite of surprise. It’s something that I feel should and will be an important component to the end of the series. To me, that is an interesting thing and a thing to be embraced, that feeling of ‘I think I know where this is going.’”
    6. Bringing Walt to justice — or not. “Of course he needs to go, and Jesse needs to pull the trigger!” “No, the cancer will return, and he’ll die alone.” “No. He’ll outsmart everyone again and go on the run.” This is the endless debate fans imagine the writers having as they attempt to answer Breaking Bad’s Most Important Question: Will Walt get away with it? Yet, Gilligan says that back-and-forth isn’t happening. “Not at all, really,” he said. “I’m very cornball in my own view of the world. It just makes sense to me that bad people should get punished and good people should be rewarded. I know it doesn’t work like that in real life, but there’s always that yearning.” But that desire for comeuppance doesn’t apply to the made-up world he’s created, even though justice may in fact be inevitable. “Oddly enough, I don’t feel any real pressure to pay off the characters, morally speaking.”
    7. One final shout-out to The Godfather. One of Gilligan’s favorite ways to describe Walt’s descent is to say that he’s gone from Mr. Chips to Scarface, but there’s been far more Godfather along the way. In the mid-season finale, Walter closed the garage door in Jesse’s face, much in the same way Michael shut Kay out of his office, and his meticulously timed murder of Mike’s remaining guys echoed the Godfather’s baptism montage in which Michael eliminated his enemies. “We crib from them shamelessly,” Gilligan told me. “We’re always asking ourselves, How does this relate to The Godfather? In the finale, we may give even a more overt tip of the hat.”
    8. Giving every character their due. Not counting baby Holly, the show has nine major characters left, including Walt’s new recruits Lydia and Todd. Gilligan says that that occasionally feels like “one or two too many.” “Sometimes it’s hard to give them all their due and make them all wrap up beautifully. That’s another big fear I have,” he said. One outcome that’s probably safe to assume? Saul will survive. “I like to think of Saul as a cockroach in the best possible way,” Gilligan said. “This is a guy who’s going to survive while the rest of us have been nuked into annihilation. He’ll be the worst-dressed cockroach in the world.”:cheer2:
    9. Hank’s triumph. It took 54 episodes, but in September’s midseason finale, Hank finally locked in that his brother-in-law was Heisenberg. Hank wasn’t conceived as the man to bring Walt down; Gilligan initially said he needed a boisterous alpha-male foil for the meek meth cook. But Hank revealed himself to be if not smarter than Walt, then more doggedly persistent. And who knows if he’ll really get to take down Heinsenberg, but the playing field has been leveled. “We discovered Hank is very, very good at his job,” Gilligan said. “You know, I love the TV show Columbo. Hank is like a postmodern shout-out to Columbo.”
    10. Finality. There will be no Breaking Bad movie. Episode 62 is it, folks. How many ways can Gilligan say it? “Rightly or wrongly, there will be a conclusive ending,” he told me. “Our story from the beginning has been designed to be close-ended. It’s very much designed to have a beginning, middle, and end and then to exist no more.”
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  2. Lemmy

    Lemmy Douchebag Extraordinaire Staff Member

    Reputations:
    271,574
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Messages:
    18,052
    Likes Received:
    5,387
    Thanks for that and reps!
     
  3. Vashier

    Vashier VIP Extreme Gold

    Reputations:
    24,035
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,189
    Likes Received:
    951
    I'm not liking where this is headed because of one line; "and rather than building from the ground up, they’ve had to do a little reverse-engineering to arrive where they must by the end."

    That is exactly what we didn't want to hear, he's using revisonist history to tie that fucking book in where it was never at before :nocheer:
     
  4. Kamie

    Kamie Active Member

    Reputations:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,375
    Likes Received:
    1
    Well, I will withhold judgement until I see it. I think that BB is brilliant due in large part to Vince Gilligan, and I'll bet the last episodes will be awesome. I think he has a vision where he thinks things should end. And things will END. As they said, no movie. It's done, and I give him props for that. By the "fucking book" I assume you mean the book Hank finds in the bathroom?
     
  5. Icculus

    Icculus Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    290
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes Received:
    31
    shits about to go down

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. FlaFlaFlunkie

    FlaFlaFlunkie Fabulous!

    Reputations:
    -910
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    42,606
    Likes Received:
    6
    I don't know about that, dude. It could mean that they've basically written the outline to the last episode and they're reversing their way to the third-to-last episode.
     
  7. FlaFlaFlunkie

    FlaFlaFlunkie Fabulous!

    Reputations:
    -910
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    42,606
    Likes Received:
    6
    It would be awesome if he goes on the run, ends up in Florida and he's killed by Dexter. :jj:
     
  8. VAsiCkBoy

    VAsiCkBoy Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    2,031
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2011
    Messages:
    9,259
    Likes Received:
    280
  9. Kamie

    Kamie Active Member

    Reputations:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,375
    Likes Received:
    1
    That guy was fucked up. I also loved the cousins with the awesome cowboy boots. We've started to watch the entire series over again in preparation for the last episodes this summer. :bigcry::bigcry::bigcry::bigcry::bigcry::bigcry:
     
  10. Vashier

    Vashier VIP Extreme Gold

    Reputations:
    24,035
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,189
    Likes Received:
    951
    Yup, remember the thread where we all ripped our hair out over where did the book come from? The book was never shown. I went through every epi after the fact looking for it. It was never shown. Now all of a sudden it's the most important piece of evidence in the show...that never existed. I hate when a writer does that. This is as much a mystery as a drama, solving the how's is half the fun. When the Hows become inventions it lessens the fun. I don't go along with those that say, "you can see the book on the counter in season 5 epi ##" because you have no idea that the book is anymore then a scene prop at that time.

    Don't get me wrong, this is my favorite show in decades. I've just been worried that he would start to "Invent" clues after the fact. Finding the hat on the coat rack would make more sense then that book given to him by a dead man that we never saw given to him. Of course if we had seen it given to him everyone would have screamed YOU DONT KEEP EVIDENCE but that's just what he did anyways soooooo.:dontknow:
     
  11. Vashier

    Vashier VIP Extreme Gold

    Reputations:
    24,035
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,189
    Likes Received:
    951
    Oh that's true, I hadn't thought of it that way
     
  12. quitefrankly

    quitefrankly Well-Known Member VIP

    Reputations:
    3,517
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Messages:
    1,571
    Likes Received:
    247
    i cant wait gonna be great im runnin thru past seasons in prep also, i agree vashier where did that book pop up all of the sudden.
     
  13. Vashier

    Vashier VIP Extreme Gold

    Reputations:
    24,035
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,189
    Likes Received:
    951
    We won't know till July, and I can't wait to find out either. I just hope he gets his 90 10 split right that he uses for a ratio of happy to unhappy fans.
     
  14. FlaFlaFlunkie

    FlaFlaFlunkie Fabulous!

    Reputations:
    -910
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    42,606
    Likes Received:
    6
    In June, I'll rewatch the series from the beginning, just before the final 8 episodes in July.
     
  15. Kamie

    Kamie Active Member

    Reputations:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,375
    Likes Received:
    1
    Found this quote from Vince Gilligan about this scene. the act of Gale giving the book to Walt never transpired onscreen. Kind of explains it:
    I like the idea of Gale’s poetic justice from beyond the grave. The writers and I love the idea of revisiting previous moments in the show because we love the idea that all actions have consequences. We know that in our day-to-day lives, but very often in television storytelling characters say things or they do things and a particular episode ends and there’s not necessarily much in the way of resonance. On this show, we very much like a character’s actions to have repercussions in ways that we identify with in real life. And to that end, we love revisiting these old moments, and Walt Whitman’s poetry was something that Gale Boetticher loved. It touched his heart and he wanted to share it with his new friend and mentor Walter White. And unfortunately the sharing of it and Walt keeping this book in hindsight proved to be a bit unwise.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  16. DogStar69

    DogStar69 Well-Known Member

    Reputations:
    10,462
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Messages:
    19,632
    Likes Received:
    1,356
    I didn't like the rescue on Gilligan's Island :dadance:
     
  17. Vashier

    Vashier VIP Extreme Gold

    Reputations:
    24,035
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,189
    Likes Received:
    951

    Sounds like his response to criticism over, "Where did the book come from." I understand his reasoning but if the book had been handed to him by Gale as he was taken back in as lab partner it would flow easier. Thing is, they had no idea this is how Walt would be caught back then. Once they came up with that idea and went with it he has to justify it. I'm sure it will all work out in the end. I just hope they don't go into adding scene's that weren't shown as a justification for new actions.
     
  18. Kamie

    Kamie Active Member

    Reputations:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,375
    Likes Received:
    1
    There is also this comparison that someone made, showing Gale's original drawing (shown in an earlier episode) versus the writing in the book, which is the same block handwriting. Also, Gale did mention that he was a fan of Walt Whitman so it is not entirely out of left field, although I agree it is somewhat of a leap.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  19. DICKWAD

    DICKWAD Ambivalent Gold

    Reputations:
    860,315
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2012
    Messages:
    20,734
    Likes Received:
    17,156
    every time I hear "Gilligan" I used to think of this,

    [​IMG]




    Now I think of this,

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Booey Logic

    Booey Logic Member

    Reputations:
    -82
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2012
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    7

Share This Page