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Stern Show This is what you call schick Coma

Discussion in 'The Howard Stern Show' started by BennyMuso, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. BennyMuso

    BennyMuso Limey MBE VIP

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  2. yaddc

    yaddc VIP Extreme Gold

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    1800 lawyer, u may be hurt and dont even no it.
     
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  3. Flabo

    Flabo Well-Known Member VIP

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    Incompetent Ronnie, Flat Ronnie is more useful
     
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  4. MorningSong13

    MorningSong13 Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  5. RaeRae

    RaeRae Rae Gold

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    I remember this. What a douche! I would have doused him with water.
     
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  6. BennyMuso

    BennyMuso Limey MBE VIP

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    I would have pissed on his head.
     
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  7. Dark Horse 77

    Dark Horse 77 Well-Known Member

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    3:50 Howard: "You gotta go for the gold pal." Guy (not believing how stupid it sounded) "Go for the gold?!" Big Tough Howard: "Get the fuck up!"
    Not sure which one is more of a baby.
     
  8. Yeahnolisten

    Yeahnolisten Well-Known Member

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    It looks like Ronnie's duties are limited to making sure no one looks at Howard when he walks down the hall and not to remove wack jobs from the studio. Guess Howard doesn't want to get sued - only Howard sues.
     
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  9. x76

    x76 giant monster Gold

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    "A shtick (Yiddish: שטיק‎) is a comic theme or gimmick derived from the Yiddish word shtik (שטיק), from Polish sztuka and GermanStück (Proto-Slavic *ščuka), meaning "piece" or "thing".

    The English word "piece" is sometimes used in a similar context. In stand-up comedy context a near equivalent term is a "bit". Another variant is "bits of business" or just "bits". Shtick may refer to an adopted persona, usually for comedy performances, that is maintained consistently (though not necessarily exclusively) across the performer's career. In this usage, the recurring personalities adopted by Laurel and Hardy through all of their many comedy films (although they often played characters with different names and occupations) would qualify as their shtick. A comedian might maintain several different shticks of this sort, particularly if appearing in a variety show encouraging development of multiple characters, such as Saturday Night Live.

    In common usage, the word shtick has also come to mean any talent, style, habit, or other eccentricity for which a person is particularly well-known, even if not intended for comedic purposes. For example, a person who is known locally for an ability to eat dozens of hot dogs quickly might say that it was his shtick. Among Orthodox Jews, "shtick" can also refer to wedding shtick, in which wedding guests entertain the bride and groom through dancing, costumes, juggling, and silliness.

    Because of its roots in show business, shtick has taken on connotation of a contrived and often used act. For this reason, journalists and commentators often apply the word disparagingly to stock replies from politicians.[1]"